Package: fortune-mod / 1:1.99.1-7

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Description: Several fixes to manpages.
Origin: fortune-mod/1.99.1-4

--- b/fortune/fortune-man.part1
+++ a/fortune/fortune-man.part1
@@ -50,9 +50,9 @@
 .SH NAME
 fortune \- print a random, hopefully interesting, adage
 .SH SYNOPSIS
-.BR fortune " [" -acefilosw "] [" -n 
+.BR fortune " [" \-acefilosuw "] [" \-n 
 .IR length "] ["
-.B -m 
+.B \-m 
 .IR pattern "] [[" n% "] " file/dir/all ]
 .SH DESCRIPTION
 When
@@ -63,28 +63,28 @@ into those which are potentially offensive and those which are not.
 .SS Options
 The options are as follows:
 .TP
-.B -a
+.B \-a
 Choose from all lists of maxims, both offensive and not.  (See the
-.B -o 
+.B \-o 
 option for more information on offensive fortunes.)
 .TP
-.B -c
+.B \-c
 Show the cookie file from which the fortune came.
 .TP
-.B -e
+.B \-e
 Consider all fortune files to be of equal size (see discussion below
 on multiple files).
 .TP
-.B -f
+.B \-f
 Print out the list of files which would be searched, but don't
 print a fortune.
 .TP
-.B -l
+.B \-l
 Long dictums only.  See 
-.B -n
+.B \-n
 on how ``long'' is defined in this sense.
 .TP
-.BI "-m " pattern
+.BI "\-m " pattern
 Print out all fortunes which match the basic regular expression
 .IR pattern .
 The syntax of these expressions depends on how your system defines
@@ -107,15 +107,15 @@ wish to remove the gathered matches from their original files, since each
 filename-record will precede the records from the file it names.
 .RE
 .TP
-.BI "-n " length
+.BI "\-n " length
 Set the longest fortune length (in characters) considered to be
 ``short'' (the default is 160).  All fortunes longer than this are
 considered ``long''.  Be careful!  If you set the length too short and
 ask for short fortunes, or too long and ask for long ones, fortune goes
 into a never-ending thrash loop.
 .TP
-.B -o
-Choose only from potentially offensive aphorisms.  The -o option is
+.B \-o
+Choose only from potentially offensive aphorisms.  The \-o option is
 ignored if a fortune directory is specified.
 .sp
 .B Please, please, please request a potentially
@@ -123,7 +123,7 @@ ignored if a fortune directory is specified.
 .B you believe, deep in your heart,
 .B that you are willing to be
 .B offended. (And that you'll just quit
-.BR using " -o " rather
+.BR using " \-o " rather
 .B than give us grief about it,
 .B okay?)
 .sp
@@ -137,21 +137,24 @@ needs be.  Needs be.
 .RE
 .RE
 .TP
-.B -s
+.B \-s
 Short apothegms only.  See
-.B -n
+.B \-n
 on which fortunes are considered ``short''.
 .TP
-.B -i
+.B \-i
 Ignore case for 
-.IR -m
+.IR \-m
 patterns.
 .TP
-.B -w
+.B \-w
 Wait before termination for an amount of time calculated from the
 number of characters in the message.  This is useful if it is executed
 as part of the logout procedure to guarantee that the message can be
 read before the screen is cleared.
+.TP
+.B \-u
+Don't translate UTF-8 fortunes to the locale when searching or translating.
 .PP
 The user may specify alternate sayings.  You can specify a specific
 file, a directory which contains one or more files, or the special word 
@@ -192,11 +195,11 @@ will pick out 90% of its fortunes from
 (the ``10% not-funny'' is unnecessary, since 10% is all that's left).
 .PP
 The 
-.B -e
+.B \-e
 option says to consider all files equal; thus
 .RS
 .sp
-.B fortune -e
+.B fortune \-e
 .I funny not-funny
 .sp
 .RE
@@ -207,15 +210,15 @@ is equivalent to
 .RI "50% " funny " 50% " not-funny
 .sp
 .RE
-This fortune also supports the BSD method of appending ``-o'' to
+This fortune also supports the BSD method of appending ``\-o'' to
 database names to specify offensive fortunes.  However this is
 .B not
 how fortune stores them: offensive fortunes are stored in a seperate
-directory without the ``-o'' infix.  A plain name (i.e., not a path to a
-file or directory) that ends in ``-o'' will be assumed to be an
+directory without the ``\-o'' infix.  A plain name (i.e., not a path to a
+file or directory) that ends in ``\-o'' will be assumed to be an
 offensive database, and will have its suffix stripped off and be
 searched in the offensive directory (even if the neither of the
-.IR -a " or " -o
+.IR \-a " or " \-o
 options were specified).  This feature is not only for
 backwards-compatibility, but also to allow users to distinguish between
 inoffensive and offensive databases of the same name.
--- b/fortune/fortune-man.part2
+++ a/fortune/fortune-man.part2
@@ -9,13 +9,13 @@ since
 no longer finds the pointers file, it ignores the text file.
 .SH BUGS
 The division of fortunes into offensive and non-offensive by directory,
-rather than via the `-o' file infix, is not 100% compatible with
-original BSD fortune. Although the `-o' infix is recognised as referring
+rather than via the `\-o' file infix, is not 100% compatible with
+original BSD fortune. Although the `\-o' infix is recognised as referring
 to an offensive database, the offensive database files still need to be
-in a separate directory.  The workaround, of course, is to move the `-o'
+in a separate directory.  The workaround, of course, is to move the `\-o'
 files into the offensive directory (with or without renaming), and to
 use the
-.B -a
+.B \-a
 option.
 .PP
 The supplied fortune databases have been attacked, in order to correct
--- b/util/strfile.man
+++ a/util/strfile.man
@@ -47,10 +47,10 @@ strfile \- create a random access file for storing strings
 .br
 unstr \- dump strings in pointer order
 .SH SYNOPSIS
-.BR strfile " [" -iorsx "] [" -c
+.BR strfile " [" \-iorsx "] [" \-c
 .IR char "] " sourcefile " [" outputfile ]
 .br
-.BR unstr " [" -c
+.BR unstr " [" \-c
 .IR char "] " datafile [ .ext ]
 .RI [ outputfile ]
 .SH DESCRIPTION
@@ -84,23 +84,23 @@ to the file specified.
 .B unstr
 can also universally change the delimiter character in a strings file.
 It is possible to create sorted versions of input files by using
-.B strfile -o 
+.B strfile \-o 
 and then using 
 .B unstr 
 to dump them out in the table order.
 .SS Options
 The options are as follows:
 .TP
-.BI "-c " char
+.BI "\-c " char
 Change the delimiting character from the percent sign to 
 .IR char .
 This option is available for both
 .BR strfile " and " unstr .
 .TP
-.B -i
+.B \-i
 Ignore case when ordering the strings.
 .TP
-.B -o
+.B \-o
 Order the strings in alphabetical order.  The offset table will be
 sorted in the alphabetical order of the groups of lines referenced.
 Any initial non-alphanumeric characters are ignored. This option
@@ -108,16 +108,16 @@ causes the STR_ORDERED bit in the header
 .I str_flags 
 field to be set. (It also now really does sort! It didn't used to).
 .TP
-.B -r
+.B \-r
 Randomize access to the strings.  Entries in the offset table will be
 randomly ordered.  This option causes the STR_RANDOM bit in the header 
 .I str_flags 
 field to be set. (And really does randomize)
 .TP
-.B -s
+.B \-s
 Run silently; don't give a summary message when finished.
 .TP
-.B -x
+.B \-x
 Note that each alphabetic character in the groups of lines is rotated
 13 positions in a simple caesar cypher.  This option causes the
 STR_ROTATED bit in the header