Package: libanyevent-perl / 7.170-2

fix-spelling.patch Patch series | download
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
Description: Fix a spelling error found by lintian
Origin: vendor
Forwarded: mailto:anyevent@lists.schmorp.de (not latest version)
Author: Alessandro Ghedini <al3xbio@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Nicholas Bamber <nicholas@periapt.co.uk>
Last-Update: 2019-07-20

--- a/lib/AnyEvent.pm
+++ b/lib/AnyEvent.pm
@@ -434,7 +434,7 @@
 C libraries for this. AnyEvent will try to do its best, which
 means in some cases, signals will be delayed. The maximum time
 a signal might be delayed is 10 seconds by default, but can
-be overriden via C<$ENV{PERL_ANYEVENT_MAX_SIGNAL_LATENCY}> or
+be overridden via C<$ENV{PERL_ANYEVENT_MAX_SIGNAL_LATENCY}> or
 C<$AnyEvent::MAX_SIGNAL_LATENCY> - see the L<ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES>
 section for details.
 
@@ -1090,7 +1090,7 @@
 If you want to sprinkle loads of logging calls around your code, consider
 creating a logger callback with the C<AnyEvent::Log::logger> function,
 which can reduce typing, codesize and can reduce the logging overhead
-enourmously.
+enormously.
 
 =item AnyEvent::fh_block $filehandle
 
@@ -2115,7 +2115,7 @@
 The exact algorithm is currently:
 
    1. if taint mode enabled, delete all PERL_ANYEVENT_xyz variables from %ENV
-   2. copy over AE_xyz to PERL_ANYEVENT_xyz unless the latter alraedy exists
+   2. copy over AE_xyz to PERL_ANYEVENT_xyz unless the latter already exists
    3. if taint mode enabled, set all PERL_ANYEVENT_xyz variables to undef.
 
 This ensures that child processes will not see the C<AE_> variables.
@@ -2186,7 +2186,7 @@
 
 If this env variable is nonempty, then its contents will be interpreted by
 C<AnyEvent::Socket::parse_hostport> and C<AnyEvent::Debug::shell> (after
-replacing every occurance of C<$$> by the process pid). The shell object
+replacing every occurrence of C<$$> by the process pid). The shell object
 is saved in C<$AnyEvent::Debug::SHELL>.
 
 This happens when the first watcher is created.
@@ -3022,7 +3022,7 @@
 implement some kind of parallel processing is almost certainly doomed.
 
 To safely fork and exec, you should use a module such as
-L<Proc::FastSpawn> that let's you safely fork and exec new processes.
+L<Proc::FastSpawn> that lets you safely fork and exec new processes.
 
 If you want to do multiprocessing using processes, you can
 look at the L<AnyEvent::Fork> module (and some related modules
@@ -3063,7 +3063,7 @@
 
 Perl 5.8 has numerous memleaks that sometimes hit this module and are hard
 to work around. If you suffer from memleaks, first upgrade to Perl 5.10
-and check wether the leaks still show up. (Perl 5.10.0 has other annoying
+and check whether the leaks still show up. (Perl 5.10.0 has other annoying
 memleaks, such as leaking on C<map> and C<grep> but it is usually not as
 pronounced).
 
--- a/lib/AnyEvent/Handle.pm
+++ b/lib/AnyEvent/Handle.pm
@@ -159,7 +159,7 @@
 =item on_error => $cb->($handle, $fatal, $message)
 
 This is the error callback, which is called when, well, some error
-occured, such as not being able to resolve the hostname, failure to
+occurred, such as not being able to resolve the hostname, failure to
 connect, or a read error.
 
 Some errors are fatal (which is indicated by C<$fatal> being true). On
@@ -367,7 +367,7 @@
 security implications, AnyEvent::Handle sets this flag automatically
 unless explicitly specified. Note that setting this flag after
 establishing a connection I<may> be a bit too late (data loss could
-already have occured on BSD systems), but at least it will protect you
+already have occurred on BSD systems), but at least it will protect you
 from most attacks.
 
 =item read_size => <bytes>
@@ -517,7 +517,7 @@
 
 For this reason, if the default encoder uses L<JSON::XS>, it will default
 to not allowing anything but arrays and objects/hashes, at least for the
-forseeable future (it will change at some point). This might or might not
+foreseeable future (it will change at some point). This might or might not
 be true for the L<JSON> module, so this might cause a security issue.
 
 If you depend on either behaviour, you should create your own json object
@@ -1875,7 +1875,7 @@
 dtection, make sure that any non-TLS data doesn't start with the octet 22
 (ASCII SYN, 16 hex) or 128-255 (i.e. highest bit set). The checks this
 read type does are a bit more strict, but might losen in the future to
-accomodate protocol changes.
+accommodate protocol changes.
 
 This read type does not rely on L<AnyEvent::TLS> (and thus, not on
 L<Net::SSLeay>).
--- a/lib/AnyEvent/TLS.pm
+++ b/lib/AnyEvent/TLS.pm
@@ -434,7 +434,7 @@
 
   certificate private key
   client/server certificate
-  ca 1, signing client/server certficate
+  ca 1, signing client/server certificate
   ca 2, signing ca 1
   ...
 
--- a/lib/AnyEvent/Intro.pod
+++ b/lib/AnyEvent/Intro.pod
@@ -60,7 +60,7 @@
 The motivation behind these designs is often that a module doesn't want
 to depend on some complicated XS-module (Net::IRC), or that it doesn't
 want to force the user to use some specific event loop at all (LWP), out
-of fear of severly limiting the usefulness of the module: If your module
+of fear of severely limiting the usefulness of the module: If your module
 requires Glib, it will not run in a Tk program.
 
 L<AnyEvent> solves this dilemma, by B<not> forcing module authors to
@@ -573,7 +573,7 @@
                my $len = sysread $fh, $response, 1024, length $response;
 
                if ($len <= 0) {
-                  # we are done, or an error occured, lets ignore the latter
+                  # we are done, or an error occurred, lets ignore the latter
                   undef $read_watcher; # no longer interested
                   $cv->send ($response); # send results
                }
@@ -1193,7 +1193,7 @@
          });
 
       } else {
-         # some error occured, no article data
+         # some error occurred, no article data
          
          $finish->($status);
       }
--- a/lib/AnyEvent/DNS.pm
+++ b/lib/AnyEvent/DNS.pm
@@ -713,7 +713,7 @@
 
 Since this is experimental, it can change, as anything can change, but
 this interface is expe ctedc to be relatively stable and was stable during
-the whole existance of C<AnyEvent::DNS> so far.
+the whole existence of C<AnyEvent::DNS> so far.
 
 Note that, since changing the decoder or encoder might break existing
 code, you should either be sure to control for this, or only temporarily
@@ -1353,7 +1353,7 @@
 
 This is the main low-level workhorse for sending DNS requests.
 
-This function sends a single request (a hash-ref formated as specified
+This function sends a single request (a hash-ref formatted as specified
 for C<dns_pack>) to the configured nameservers in turn until it gets a
 response. It handles timeouts, retries and automatically falls back to
 virtual circuit mode (TCP) when it receives a truncated reply. It does not
--- a/lib/AnyEvent/Debug.pm
+++ b/lib/AnyEvent/Debug.pm
@@ -68,7 +68,7 @@
 variables still in the global scope means you can debug them easier.
 
 As no authentication is done, in most cases it is best not to use a TCP
-port, but a unix domain socket, whcih can be put wherever you can access
+port, but a unix domain socket, which can be put wherever you can access
 it, but not others:
 
    our $SHELL = AnyEvent::Debug::shell "unix/", "/home/schmorp/shell";
@@ -84,7 +84,7 @@
 
    socat readline,history=.anyevent-history unix:shell
 
-Binding on C<127.0.0.1> (or C<::1>) might be a less secure but sitll not
+Binding on C<127.0.0.1> (or C<::1>) might be a less secure but still not
 totally insecure (on single-user machines) alternative to let you use
 other tools, such as telnet:
 
@@ -583,7 +583,7 @@
 
 Each object is a relatively standard hash with the following members:
 
-   type   => name of the method used ot create the watcher (e.g. C<io>, C<timer>).
+   type   => name of the method used to create the watcher (e.g. C<io>, C<timer>).
    w      => the actual watcher
    rfile  => reference to the filename of the file the watcher was created in
    line   => line number where it was created
--- a/lib/AnyEvent/Log.pm
+++ b/lib/AnyEvent/Log.pm
@@ -1242,7 +1242,7 @@
 name is first mentioned. The difference to package contexts is that by
 default they have no attached slaves.
 
-This makes it possible to create new log contexts that can be refered to
+This makes it possible to create new log contexts that can be referred to
 multiple times by name within the same log specification.
 
 =item a perl package name
--- a/lib/AnyEvent/Impl/IOAsync.pm
+++ b/lib/AnyEvent/Impl/IOAsync.pm
@@ -38,7 +38,7 @@
 choice.
 
 Note that switching loops while watchers are already initialised can have
-unexpected effects, and is not supported unless you can live witht he
+unexpected effects, and is not supported unless you can live with the
 consequences.
 
 =item $AnyEvent::Impl::IOAsync::LOOP