File: README.Debian

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alpine 1.10%2Bdfsg-3
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This file provides notes for users of the Alpine package.

== Sending email ==

By default, alpine doesn't know how to send email.  If your system is
configured with a working local mail transport agent, you can configure
PINE to do SMTP to localhost by pressing these keys:

M (Main screen)
S (Setup)
C (Configuration)

Navigate to the smtp-server entry, press enter, and type "localhost".  Press enter again.

E (Exit setup)
Y ("Yes" replaces settings)

System administrators may want to set smtp-server in the /etc/pinerc.

== Maildir ==

The package for pine in Debian provides a patch to let it read
Maildir-style mail boxes.  This package does not yet provide that
functionality.  I am looking for a moderately good solution for this,
as per Debian bug #405762.

== Passfile ==

The washington.edu developers of Alpine and Pine have a feature they
implemented but don't like called "passfile".  This lets users store
their passwords in a file so they don't have to type it each time they
run the mail program.  This feature is similar to "Save password"
features in Thunderbird, Icedove, Evolution, and other mail user
agents that are or have been in Debian.

In this package, the file ~/.pine-passfile is where Alpine stores its
obfuscated password.

NOTE: If you save your password here, and someone else can get a copy
of this file, then that person has your password!

== Bugs ==

If you have problems with this package and are using Debian, please
submit a bug using the Debian bug reporting system.  The easiest way
to do this is to use the program "reportbug" as packaged in Debian.

If you are using a Debian-derived distribution, you may have a
modified package.  For example, if you are using Ubuntu, and the
alpine package version number contains the word "ubuntu" in it, then
it is probably modified.  Modified packages' bugs should be submitted
with the bug tracker of the group that did the modifying.

But if you have an unmodified package, even running on a non-Debian
system, it should be okay to file bugs against the Debian bug tracker.
Information on how to do that is available at
http://www.debian.org/Bugs/Reporting - see the "Example" section.