File: apt-cacher.conf

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apt-cacher 0.9.4sarge1
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#################################################################
# This is the config file for apt-cacher. On most Debian systems
# you can safely leave the defaults alone.
#################################################################

# cache_dir is used to set the location of the local cache. This can
# become quite large, so make sure it is somewhere with plenty of space.
cache_dir=/var/cache/apt-cacher

# The email address of the administrator is displayed in the info page
# and traffic reports.
admin_email=root@localhost

# If your apt-cacher machine is directly exposed to the Internet and you are
# worried about unauthorised machines fetching packages through it, you can
# specify a list of IPv4 addresses which are allowed to use it and another
# list of IPv4 addresses which aren't.
# Localhost (127.0.0.1) is always allowed. Other addresses must be matched
# by allowed_hosts and not by denied_hosts to be permitted to use the cache.
# Setting allowed_hosts to "*" means "allow all".
# Otherwise the format is a comma-separated list containing addresses,
# optionally with masks (like 10.0.0.0/22), or ranges of addresses (two
# addresses separated by a hyphen, no masks, like '192.168.0.3-192.168.0.56').
allowed_hosts=*
denied_hosts=

# And similiarly for IPv6 with allowed_hosts_6 and denied_hosts_6.
# Note that IPv4-mapped IPv6 addresses (::ffff:w.x.y.z) are truncated to
# w.x.y.z and are handled as IPv4.
allowed_hosts_6=fec0::/16
denied_hosts_6=

# This thing can be done by Apache but is much simplier here - limit access to
# Debian mirrors based on server names in the URLs
#allowed_locations=ftp.uni-kl.de,ftp.nerim.net,debian.tu-bs.de

# Apt-cacher can generate usage reports every 24 hours if you set this
# directive to 1. You can view the reports in a web browser by pointing
# to your cache machine with '/apt-cacher/report' on the end, like this:
#      http://yourcache.example.com/apt-cacher/report
# Generating reports is very fast even with many thousands of logfile
# lines, so you can safely turn this on without creating much 
# additional system load.
generate_reports=1

# Apt-cacher can clean up its cache directory every 24 hours if you set
# this directive to 1. Cleaning the cache can take some time to run
# (generally in the order of a few minutes) and removes all package
# files that are not mentioned in any existing 'Packages' lists. This
# has the effect of deleting packages that have been superseded by an
# updated 'Packages' list.
clean_cache=1

# The directory to use for apt-cacher access and error logs.
# The access log records every request in the format:
# date-time|client ip address|HIT/MISS/RELOAD|object size|object name
# The error log is slightly more free-form, and is also used for debug
# messages if debug mode is turned on.
# Note that the old 'logfile' and 'errorfile' directives are
# deprecated: if you set them explicitly they will be honoured, but it's
# better to just get rid of them from old config files.
logdir=/var/log/apt-cacher

# apt-cacher can use different methods to decide whether package lists need to
# be updated,
# A) looking at the age of the cached files
# B) getting HTTP header from server and comparing that with cached data. This
# method is more reliable and avoids desynchronisation of data and index files
# but needs to transfer few bytes from the server every time somebody requests
# the files ("apt-get update")
# Set the following value to the maximum age (in hours) for method A or to 0
# for method B
expire_hours=0

# Apt-cacher can pass all its requests to an external http proxy like
# Squid, which could be very useful if you are using an ISP that blocks
# port 80 and requires all web traffic to go through its proxy. The
# format is 'hostname:port', eg: 'proxy.example.com:8080'.
http_proxy=proxy.example.com:8080

# Use of an external proxy can be turned on or off with this flag.
# Value should be either 0 (off) or 1 (on):
use_proxy=0

# Rate limiting sets the maximum bandwidth in bytes per second to use
# for fetching packages. Syntax is fully defined in 'man wget'.
# Use 'k' or 'm' to use kilobits or megabits / second: eg, 'limit=25k'.
# Use 0 or a negative value for no rate limiting.
limit=0

# Debug mode makes apt-cacher spew a lot of extra debug junk to the
# error log (whose location is defined with the 'logdir' directive).
# Leave this off unless you need it, or your error log will get very
# big. Acceptable values are 0 or 1.
debug=0