File: README

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bibledit-gtk 4.6-1
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The bibledit program is used editing work done during revising or
translating a Bible.


To install the bibledit program, read file INSTALL.




General programming notes:

At first gtkmm-2.0 was used because of its ease of use.
But later gtk+2.x (and higher) was used, for these reasons:
- A bug in gtkmm caused the default button in a dialog not to be activated 
  when Enter was pressed. Gtk+ did not have this problem.
- I gtkmm-2.4 signal_cursor_moved was suddenly removed. This was queries on 
  the gtkmm discussionlist. The reply given made me to loose confidence
  in gtkmm.
- In Gtk+ the Glade interface designer could be used, and that makes
  designing interfaces so much faster and simpler.



Bibledit should be easily portable to other platforms, such as Mac OS X, 
Windows, and other Unix likes. For this reasons it uses as few libraries
as possible. This is the reason that the Gnome libraries are not used.
It is also good to not use the very newest Gtk+ libraries, but wait a 
while until most newer distributions have them in their stock distribution.



A tool to measure cpu usage of the various functions.
valgrind --tool=callgrind bibledit-bin
Graphical tools to display the information that was collected:
- alleyoop
- kcachegrind



Git repository notes.
The git repository is in folder ".git".
There is file .git/hooks/commit-msg, this is needed to send out commit messages. Here's the content:
-----
#!/bin/sh
#
# An example hook script to check the commit log message.
# Called by git-commit with one argument, the name of the file
# that has the commit message.  The hook should exit with non-zero
# status after issuing an appropriate message if it wants to stop the
# commit.  The hook is allowed to edit the commit message file.
#
# To enable this hook, make this file executable.


# Store the commit message for later mailing out to the list.
cat $1 >> /tmp/bibleditcommits
-----

Then, there's file .git/info/exclude:
-----
# git-ls-files --others --exclude-from=.git/info/exclude
# Lines that start with '#' are comments.
# For a project mostly in C, the following would be a good set of
# exclude patterns (uncomment them if you want to use them):
*.[oa]
*~
bibledit-bibletime
bibledit-git
bibledit-help
bibledit-restart
bibledit
bibledit-olpc-librarian
bibledit-one
bibledit-shutdown
bibledit-*.gz
eeepc-install-menu
*.cache
*.Po
allpages
contents
CVS
bumpversion
Makefile
config.log
config.status
.deps
.cvsignore
-----