File: bit-babbler.NEWS

package info (click to toggle)
bit-babbler 0.8
  • links: PTS
  • area: main
  • in suites: buster, sid
  • size: 1,900 kB
  • sloc: cpp: 10,297; sh: 4,301; perl: 1,017; ansic: 1,013; makefile: 84
file content (32 lines) | stat: -rw-r--r-- 1,870 bytes parent folder | download
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
bit-babbler (0.8) unstable; urgency=medium

  The 0.8 release changes the way which seedd(1) is normally configured when
  started as a system daemon.  Previously, configuration options could be set
  in /etc/default/seedd, but systemd doesn't support handling those in the way
  which we did so in the SysV init script.  So now, when seedd is started from
  either the seedd.service systemd unit or the SysV init script, it will be
  configured using the options set in /etc/bit-babbler/seedd.conf instead.

  If you have customised the configuration in /etc/default/seedd then it will
  automatically be preserved during upgrade by generating an equivalent custom
  seedd.conf for you.  The old configuration file content will be retained in
  /etc/default/seedd.dpkg-old, in case there are other things in there (like
  comments) that you do wish to keep a note of somewhere, but it can be safely
  removed when there is nothing in it which you still need.  Nothing in this
  package will use anything from /etc/default after this.

  For reference, the packaged default seedd.conf will still be installed (in
  the same way as if you had selected "keep your currently-installed version"
  at the dpkg conffile prompt) as /etc/bit-babbler/seedd.conf.dpkg-new for you
  to inspect.  You can safely modify the generated seedd.conf however you wish
  after this, as it will not be (re)generated again on future updates.  Future
  updates will be handled with the normal dpkg mechanism for conffiles when
  there are any changes in the packaged and locally installed versions which
  need to be resolved.

  If you have not modified /etc/default/seedd, then it will simply be removed
  and the equivalent default seedd.conf will be installed, making this change
  (even more) completely transparent to you.

 -- Ron Lee <ron@debian.org>  Thu, 08 Feb 2018 10:26:52 +1030