File: install.texi

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@c set the vars LIBBOW_VERSION
@include version.texi

@ifset INSTALL_ONLY
@chapter Installing @samp{libbow}
@end ifset

To compile and install @samp{libbow}:

@enumerate

@item
Configure the source for your system by typing

@example
./configure --prefix=/usr/local
@end example

Where @samp{/usr/local} can be replaced with any pre-existing directory
in which you want to install the package.  Executables will go in
@samp{prefix}/bin.  The library, @code{libbow} will go in
@samp{prefix}/lib.  The include files will go in
@samp{prefix}/include/bow.

If you want to turn off all debugging assertions, you can do this by
setting CPPFLAGS in the configuration line.

@example
CPPFLAGS=-DNDEBUG ./configure --prefix=/usr/local
@end example

More detailed information about the @samp{configure} options can be
found below.

@item
Make libbow.  (Note, libbow requires GCC, and the Makefile requires GNU
make.)

@example
make
@end example

You can now try running the sample programs, (e.g. @samp{rainbow}).  See
the README file for some examples.

@item
Install libbow

@example
make install
@end example

@end enumerate

Here are general instructions for @file{configure}, that explain
@file{configure}'s options.

@enumerate

@item
Configure the package for your system.  In the directory that this file
is in, type @samp{./configure}.  If you're using @samp{csh} on an old
version of System V, you might need to type @samp{sh configure} instead
to prevent @samp{csh} from trying to execute @samp{configure} itself.

The @samp{configure} shell script attempts to guess correct values for
various system-dependent variables used during compilation, and creates
the Makefile(s) (one in each subdirectory of the source directory).  In
some packages it creates a C header file containing system-dependent
definitions.  It also creates a file @samp{config.status} that you can
run in the future to recreate the current configuration.

Running @samp{configure} takes less than a minute or two.  While it is
running, it prints some messages that tell what it is doing.  If you
don't want to see the messages, run @samp{configure} with its standard
output redirected to @samp{/dev/null}; for example:
@smallexample 
./configure >/dev/null
@end smallexample

To compile the package in a different directory from the one containing
the source code, you must use a version of make that supports the VPATH
variable, such as GNU make.  @samp{cd} to the directory where you want
the object files and executables to go and run @samp{configure}.
@samp{configure} automatically checks for the source code in the
directory that @samp{configure} is in and in @samp{..}.  If for some
reason @samp{configure} is not in the source code directory that you are
configuring, then it will report that it can't find the source code.  In
that case, run @samp{configure} with the option @samp{--srcdir=DIR},
where DIR is the directory that contains the source code.

By default, @samp{make install} will install the package's files in
/usr/local/bin, /usr/local/lib, /usr/local/man, etc.  You can specify
an installation prefix other than /usr/local by giving @samp{configure} the
option @samp{--prefix=PATH}.  Alternately, you can do so by giving a value
for the @samp{prefix} variable when you run @samp{make}, e.g.,
@smallexample
make prefix=/usr/gnu
@end smallexample

You can specify separate installation prefixes for architecture-specific
files and architecture-independent files.  If you give @samp{configure}
the option @samp{--exec_prefix=PATH} or set the @samp{make} variable
@samp{exec_prefix} to PATH, the package will use PATH as the prefix for
installing programs and libraries.  Data files and documentation will
still use the regular prefix.  Normally, all files are installed using
the regular prefix.

You can tell @samp{configure} to figure out the configuration for your
system, and record it in @samp{config.status}, without actually
configuring the package (creating @samp{Makefile}s and perhaps a
configuration header file).  To do this, give @samp{configure} the
@samp{--no-create} option.  Later, you can run @samp{./config.status} to
actually configure the package.  This option is useful mainly in
@samp{Makefile} rules for updating @samp{config.status} and
@samp{Makefile}.  You can also give @samp{config.status} the
@samp{--recheck} option, which makes it re-run @samp{configure} with the
same arguments you used before.  This is useful if you change
@samp{configure}.

@samp{configure} ignores any other arguments that you give it.

If your system requires unusual options for compilation or linking that
@samp{configure} doesn't know about, you can give @samp{configure}
initial values for some variables by setting them in the environment.
In Bourne-compatible shells, you can do that on the command line like
this:
@smallexample
CC='gcc -traditional' DEFS=-D_POSIX_SOURCE ./configure
@end smallexample

The @samp{make} variables that you might want to override with environment
variables when running @samp{configure} are:

(For these variables, any value given in the environment overrides the
value that @samp{configure} would choose:)
@table @samp

@item CC
C compiler program.  Default is @samp{cc}, or @samp{gcc} if @samp{gcc}
is in your PATH. 

@item INSTALL
Program to use to install files.
Default is @samp{install} if you have it, @samp{install.sh} otherwise.
@end table


(For these variables, any value given in the environment is added to
the value that @samp{configure} chooses:)
@table @samp

@item DEFS
Configuration options, in the form @samp{-Dfoo -Dbar ...}

@item LIBS
Libraries to link with, in the form @samp{-lfoo -lbar ...}
@end table

If you need to do unusual things to compile the package, we encourage
you to figure out how @samp{configure} could check whether to do them, and
mail diffs or instructions to the address given in the @samp{README} so we
can include them in the next release.


@item
Type @samp{make} to compile the package.  If you want, you can override
the @samp{make} variables @samp{CFLAGS} and @samp{LDFLAGS} like this:
@smallexample
	make CFLAGS=-O2 LDFLAGS=-s
@end smallexample

@item
Type @samp{make install} to install programs, data files, and
documentation.

@item
You can remove the program binaries and object files from the source
directory by typing @samp{make clean}.  To also remove the Makefile(s),
and @samp{config.status} (all the files that @samp{configure} created),
type @samp{make maintainer-clean}.

The file @samp{configure.in} is used as a template to create
@samp{configure} by a program called @samp{autoconf}.  You will only
need it if you want to regenerate @samp{configure} using a newer version
of @samp{autoconf}.

@end enumerate