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bzr-gtk 0.103.0+bzr792-3
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bzr-gtk - GTK+ Frontends to various Bazaar commands
===================================================

This is a plugin for bzr that contains various GTK+ frontends to 
Bazaar commands. It currently contains a tool to see the history
and relationships between the revisions visually and one to 
view annotated files.


Dependencies
------------

bzr-gtk is written in Python, so doesn't need compiling, however you will
need the following runtime dependencies:

  * Python 2.4
  * Bazaar with the same major version as bzr-gtk
  * PyGObject

In order to see graphs in the visualisation tool, you will also need:

  * PyCairo 1.0 or later

In order to see syntax highlighted diffs:

  * GtkSourceView2 Python bindings (on Debian and Ubuntu systems, these
    are in the python-gtksourceview2 package)

In order to use the nautilus integration, you will need:

 * python-nautilus

For Olive on Windows:

 * pyWin32 (tested with build 209)

Installation
------------

The easiest way to install bzr-gtk is to either copy or symlink the
directory into your ~/.bazaar/plugins directory.

Other ways include doing the same in the bzrlib/plugins directory of
your bzr working tree, or adding the location of bzr-gtk to your
BZR_PLUGIN_PATH environment variable.

Note: the plugin directory of bzr-gtk must be called 'gtk'.

To use the nautilus integration, either place the nautilus-bzr.py file in
~/.nautilus/python-extensions or in /usr/lib/nautilus/extensions-1.0/python

Please note that python-nautilus currently uses the .so file of Python 
so you will need to have python-dev installed or you need to manually create a 
libpythonVER.so symlink in /usr/lib (where VER is your version of python, e.g.
2.4 or 2.5).

Usage - Visualisation
---------------------

Simply run "bzr visualise" (or "bzr viz") while in a bzr working tree or
branch, a window will appear with the history of the branch and a graph
connecting the individual revisions.

You can move through the revision history by clicking or with the arrow
keys.  You can also use the Back (shortcut '[') and Forward (shortcut ']')
buttons which move to the previous and next revision from that selected
(which may not be immediately adjacent in the list).

Details for the selected revision are shown in the pane at the bottom,
including the ids of the parent revisions.  Clicking on the go icon next
to a parent moves the list to that revision; clicking on the view icon
opens a window to display the difference between the two revisions.

Usage - annotate
----------------

Simply run "bzr gannotate FILENAME" while in a bzr working tree or branch.
 
The commit log message is shown in the lower window pane for the selected
line.  The line number column is searchable; jump to a specific line by typing
the line number while the annotation pane is in focus. Control-f will also
initiate a search.

By default, lines are highlighted according to age. This functionality is a
crib of emacs' VC-annotate highlighting, and thus works similarly: blue is
oldest and red is youngest, and an assortment of other colors in-between:

        blue --> green --> yellow --> orange --> red

Time spans are scaled; for instance by selecting "1 Day", lines older than a
day will be highlighted blue, but changes in the past hour will be red and
lines 2 hours old may be orange. Highlighting can be turned off with --plain
if overwhelming.

Usage - diff window
-------------------

If you have the gtksourceview python bindings installed, the diff window
will have syntax highlighting. If the python GConf bindings are installed, 
the colors will be read from gedit's syntax highlighting configuration
for the "Diff" language.

Afterwards, colors from the ~/.colordiffrc file will be read, and will
override gedit's. Since that file may be written for a dark background
environment, the file ~/.colordiffrc.bzr-gtk can be used to override
some values.

Because gtksourceview is more configurable that colordiff, in addition
to the 'oldtext', 'newtext', and 'diffstuff' keys, the following keys
are also accepted: 'location', 'file', 'specialcase'.

Colors can be specified with names (valid names are those in the
/usr/share/X11/rgb.txt file), or with a #RRGGBB notation.

Install on Windows
------------------

You can download the dependencies from the following locations:

 - Python: http://www.python.org/download/releases/2.4.3/
 - GTK: http://gladewin32.sourceforge.net/
 - PyGTK: http://www.mapr.ucl.ac.be/~gustin/win32_ports (pygobject and pycairo)
 - Bazaar: http://bazaar-vcs.org/WindowsDownloads (Python-based should be okay)
 - pyWin32: http://sourceforge.net/project/showfiles.php?group_id=78018

As an Administrator, you can install Olive with the standard command:

 > c:\Python24\python.exe setup.py install

You can run Olive with this command:

 > c:\Python24\python.exe c:\Python\Scripts\olive-gtk