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ccontrol 0.9.1+20060806-2
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CCONTROL: Control your compiles
===============================

Distcc is great, so is ccache.  But they are a PITA to control, as you
need to change environment variables and/or set CC, add -j to make
lines, etc.  Explicit control of which compiler you want to use is
hard.

Enter ccontrol: it takes over invocations of make(1), gcc(1), cc(1),
g++(1), c++(1) and ld(1), and decides intelligently what to do, based
on a config file in the .ccontrol subdirectory of your home directory.
In particular, it allows different options depending on which
directory it is run in: you can suppress parallel builds for projects
(or particular make targets) which don't have correctly-working
Makefiles, use a different compiler, or not use ccache or distcc,
depending on where you are.

GETTING STARTED
---------------

I recommend installing dietlibc if you can; the resulting (static)
binary is smaller and cuts a few percent off compile times.

If you want to install ccontrol in your home directory (eg. ~/bin),
use "./configure --bindir=$HOME/bin".  Otherwise, a simple
"./configure" will place the binaries in /usr/local/lib/ccontrol,
which you will have to put in your PATH.

The type "make" and "make install".  Now run "./ccontrol-init" to
create a ".ccontrol/default" file.  If you want to avoid probing
for distcc hosts on the local network, set DISTCC_HOSTS first, eg:

	DISTCC_HOSTS="one two three" ./ccontrol-init

TROUBLESHOOTING
---------------

Use distccmon-gnome (or "watch distccmon-text") to check if distcc is
working as expected.  Use "watch ccache -s" to check if ccache is
working as expected.

If top reveals lots of "cc1", or your load is over 10, make sure your
Makefiles are invoking "gcc" or "cc" (ie. ccontrol), not the compiler
directly.

If your configuration file isn't working, try putting "verbose" in the
section you think should apply, or if all else fails, in the "[*]"
section.

MORE FUN
--------

You can read the ccontrol(1) man page and configure your
.ccontrol/config file, which is usually a symlink to .ccontrol/default.

HACKING
-------

Feedback on documentation, problems you had, and distribution
variations gratefully accepted!

Changes to ccontrol code will only be accepted with an accompanying
testcase or a really good excuse.  To make changes, install the
following packages:

	asciidoc	(to regenerate the manpages)
	xmlto		(to regenerate the manpages)
	gperf		(to regenerate the keyword list)

And I recommend the following:
	mercurial	(to view and commit changes)
	valgrind	(to improve testsuite thoroughness)

After your changes, configure with "./configure --enable-debug" and
run "make check".  Testcases are fairly simple to write: the comments
at the top control how the test is activated, and the output expected.
Use "hg bundle" to send a convenient ball of changes back to me for
merging.

Happy hacking!
Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au>