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                                   ccrypt

   Secure encryption and decryption of files and streams
     _________________________________________________________________

  Updated March 28, 2004

  Description

   ccrypt is a utility for encrypting and decrypting files and streams.
   It was designed as a replacement for the standard unix crypt utility,
   which is notorious for using a very weak encryption algorithm. ccrypt
   is based on the Rijndael cipher, which is the U.S. government's chosen
   candidate for the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES, see
   http://www.nist.gov/aes/).  This cipher is believed to provide very
   strong security.

   Unlike unix crypt, the algorithm provided by ccrypt is not symmetric,
   i.e., one must specify whether to encrypt or decrypt. The most common
   way to invoke ccrypt is via the commands ccencrypt and ccdecrypt.
   There is also a ccat command for decrypting a file directly to the
   terminal, thus reducing the likelihood of leaving temporary plaintext
   files around.  In addition, there is a compatibility mode for
   decrypting legacy unix crypt files. An emacs mode is also supplied for
   editing encrypted text files.

   Encryption and decryption depends on a keyword (or key phrase)
   supplied by the user.  By default, the user is prompted to enter a
   keyword from the terminal.  Keywords can consist of any number of
   characters, and all characters are significant (although ccrypt
   internally hashes the key to 256 bits). Longer keywords provide better
   security than short ones, since they are less likely to be discovered
   by exhaustive search.

   For a detailed description of the encryption algorithm used by ccrypt,
   see the man page.

  Downloading and Installing from Source

   The current version of ccrypt can be downloaded as a gzipped tar
   archive from http://ccrypt.sourceforge.net/. You can unpack the
   archive with a command such as

       tar -zxf ccrypt-XXX.tar.gz

   For compiling and installation, please follow the instructions in
   the file INSTALL.

   The only non-standard configuration option is --disable-libcrypt.
   Normally, ccrypt will be linked against the libcrypt library, if
   available. If this library is not available, or if the
   --disable-libcrypt option is given to ./configure, then we will use
   our own replacement for this library. This is useful for creating
   binary distributions when we don't want to distribute libcrypt.so.

  Downloading and Installing Precompiled Distributions

   ccrypt is also available in precompiled formats for a number of
   popular platforms, including Linux, MacOS X, FreeBSD, Sun Solaris,
   AIX, and Windows under CygWin.  In each case, just install the
   binaries in one of the places where the operating system usually
   looks for them, such as /usr/local/bin. You should also create
   symbolic links to the ccrypt binary named ccencrypt, ccdecrypt, and
   ccat; when ccrypt is invoked by one of these names, its default
   behavior changes. To create the appropriate links, change to the
   directory where you have installed ccrypt, and run the commands

       ln -s ccrypt ccencrypt 
       ln -s ccrypt ccdecrypt 
       ln -s ccrypt ccat

   You may also want to install the man page by copying ccrypt.1 to an
   appropriate directory, such as /usr/local/man/man1.

   Windows users see the file README.win.

   For users of the Redhat Package Manager, ccrypt is also available
   as a source RPM or binary RPM.

  Usage

Usage: ccrypt [mode] [options] [file...]
       ccencrypt [options] [file...]
       ccdecrypt [options] [file...]
       ccat [options] file...

Modes:
    -e, --encrypt          encrypt
    -d, --decrypt          decrypt
    -c, --cat              cat; decrypt files to stdout
    -x, --keychange        change key
    -u, --unixcrypt        decrypt old unix crypt files

Options:
    -h, --help             print this help message and exit
    -V, --version          print version info and exit
    -L, --license          print license info and exit
    -v, --verbose          print progress information to stderr
    -q, --quiet            run quietly; suppress warnings
    -f, --force            overwrite existing files without asking
    -m, --mismatch         allow decryption with non-matching key
    -E, --envvar var       read keyword from environment variable (unsafe)
    -K, --key key          give keyword on command line (unsafe)
    -k, --keyfile file     read keyword(s) as first line(s) from file
    -P, --prompt prompt    use this prompt instead of default
    -S, --suffix .suf      use suffix .suf instead of default .cpt
    -s, --strictsuffix     refuse to encrypt files which already have suffix
    -F, --envvar2 var      as -E for second keyword (for keychange mode)
    -H, --key2 key         as -K for second keyword (for keychange mode)
    -Q, --prompt2 prompt   as -P for second keyword (for keychange mode)
    -t, --timid            prompt twice for encryption keys (default)
    -b, --brave            prompt only once for encryption keys
    -r, --recursive        recurse through directories
    -R, --rec-symlinks     follow symbolic links as subdirectories
    -l, --symlinks         dereference symbolic links
    -T, --tmpfiles         use temporary files instead of overwriting (unsafe)
    --                     end of options, filenames follow

   For detailed usage information, see the man page.

  Emacs support

   ccrypt comes with an emacs package for reading and writing encrypted
   files. The package is called jka-compr-ccrypt, and it is based
   directly on the jka-compr package which is part of GNU Emacs. It
   handles both encrypted and compressed files (although currently not
   encrypted compressed files).

   To use the package, simply load jka-compr-ccrypt and edit as usual.
   When you open a file with the ".cpt" extension, emacs will prompt you
   for a password for the file. It will remember the password for the
   buffer, and when you save the file later, it will be automatically
   encrypted again (provided you save it with a ".cpt" extension). Except
   for the password prompt, the operation of the package should be
   transparent to the user. The package also handles compressed ".gz",
   ".bz2", and ".Z" files, and it should be used instead of, not in
   addition to, jka-compr. The command M-x ccrypt-set-buffer-password can
   be used to change the current password of a buffer.

   The simplest way to use this package is to include the lines

       (setq load-path (cons "path" load-path))
       (require 'jka-compr-ccrypt "jka-compr-ccrypt.el")

   in your .emacs file, where path is the directory which holds the file
   jka-compr-ccrypt.el.

  Support and Reporting Bugs

   Ccrypt has a project page on SourceForge at
   http://sourceforge.net/projects/ccrypt/. There you will find facilities
   for reporting bugs, submitting patches, asking for support, asking for
   features, or discussing ccrypt in general. You are encouraged to use
   these facilities. You can also send email to the author.

  Author

   Copyright (C) 2000-2004 Peter Selinger <selinger at users.sourceforge.net>

  License

   This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
   it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
   the Free Software Foundation; either version 2, or (at your option)
   any later version.

   This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
   WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
   MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU
   General Public License for more details.

   You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
   along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
   Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA.

  GPG Key

   Peter Selinger's GPG key fingerprint is:
   12A2 4B3C 3790 B688 E484  7A98 A68B CC37 CA31 696A