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cdparanoia 3.10.2+debian-11
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cdparanoia III release 10.2 README
[September 11, 2008]

Monty <monty@xiph.org>

This CDDA reader distribution ('cdparanoia') reads audio from the
CDROM directly as data, with no analog step between, and writes the
data to a file or pipe as .wav, .aifc or as raw 16 bit linear PCM.

These are installation notes; for lots of other cdparanoia related
information, see:

http://www.xiph.org/paranoia/

COPYING
=======

cdparanoia (the command line tool) is released under the GPLv2.  The
interface and paranoia libraries are covered by the LGPLv2.1.

Requirements
============

1. A CDDA capable CDROM drive (ATAPI, SCSI, or proprietary)

2. For proprietary drives:
   2a. kernel support for the particular CDROM in use
   
   For ATAPI CDROM drives:

   Best:
   2b. IDE cdrom (ATAPI) and SG_IO support (normal in 2.6 kernels)

	(*or*)

   Second best: (kernels older than 2.6)
   2c. IDE-SCSI host adaptor emulation 
   2d. SCSI cdrom support (optional)
   2e. kernel support for the generic SCSI interface and proper device 
	(/dev/sg?) files in /dev. Most distributions already have the 
	/dev/sg? files.  devfs [supported] sets this up automagically.

	(*or*)

   Works, but can be cranky: (kernels older than 2.6)
   2f. IDE cdrom (ATAPI) support without SG_IO, uses old read ioctl.


   For SCSI CDROM drives:

   2g. SCSI cdrom and SG_IO support (normal in 2.6 kernels)
       
       (*or*)

   2h. kernel support for the generic SCSI interface and proper device 
	(/dev/sg?) files in /dev. Most distributions already have the 
	/dev/sg? files. (kernels older than 2.6)

3. A Linux 2.4.x, 2.5.x or 2.6.x kernel 

Timing changes as of cdparanoia 10.2 likely mandate the use of a 2.4
or later kernel (tested).  Older kernels may be missing the realtime
clock infrastructure now needed for the beefed up cache paranoia added
to 10.2.

Cdparanoia does not require threading, IPC or sound card support.

Compiling cdparanoia
==================

To build the cdparanoia utility:

	./configure
	make all
	
This will compile cdparanoia and the shared paranoia libs; make
install (as root) will install it. This version uses shared paranoia
libs; you can still build the static version as follows:

	./configure
	make all STATIC=TRUE

Unlike cdda2wav and readcdda, cdparanoia is smart enough to find CDROM
drives and the appropriate interfaces automatically; if you have only
one CDROM drive, you'll not need to worry about it.  If your machine
has more than one CDROM drive and cdparanoia finds the wrong one,
you'll need to tell it which device to use on the command line (see
the man page and Troubleshooting below).

To build the cdda_interface.a and cdda_paranoia.a libraries:

	./configure
	make lib

The .so shared libraries can be built as follows:

	./configure
	make slib

Other build notes (such as building and using a debugging version of
cdparanoia to aid me in tracking down any trouble) can be found on the
Cdparanoia web site at the URL given above.

Additional installation notes
=============================

Most Linux setups automagically perform the steps described below. The
list is useful for doublechecking, or for setting up very old linux
installs (pre-2002).

(for SCSI devices)

  Cdparanoia requires either:
  1. SCSI cdrom support with SG_IO support or 
  2. the generic SCSI interface.  

  In new kernels, SG_IO support is standard.  On kernels older than
  2.6, you will need a kernel with compiled-in or module-supplied sg
  interface.  In case of a module, this has to be loaded ('modprobe
  sg'; usually done in boot time scripts).  This can be verified with
  'cat /proc/devices'. It should have a line under Character devices:
  21 sg

  When using the generic SCSI interface, cdparanoia also uses (but
  doesn't really require) the kernel SCSI cdrom driver, ie, a kernel
  with compiled-in or module-supplied cdrom support. In case of a
  module, this has to be loaded ('modprobe sr_mod'; again, usually
  part of boot up scripts).  This can be verified with 'cat
  /proc/devices'. It should have a line under Block devices: 11 sr

  If the modules are properly configured but not currently loaded, 
  cdparanoia will trigger loading during its autoscanning.

  In the /dev directory there have to be these descriptors:
  br--------   1 cduser   user      11,   0 Jan 23  1995 sr0
  br--------   1 cduser   user      11,   1 Mar 24  1993 sr1
  etc...

  and
  crw-------   1 cduser   user      21,   0 Aug 27  1995 sga
  crw-------   1 cduser   user      21,   1 Aug 27  1995 sgb
  crw-------   1 cduser   user      21,   2 Aug 27  1995 sgc
  etc...

  and a link named 'cdrom' to the cdrom drive used.  The link can be
  to the cdrom device *or* the generic device.  The link isn't required,
  but it will speed autodetection.

  Permissions and ownership can be changed at will, of course.
  Here access is permitted only to user 'cduser'.

(for ATAPI and proprietary cdrom devices)

  The kernel must have compiled-in or module-supplied cdrom support.
  In case of a module, this has to be loaded ('modprobe <modulename>';
  this is normally included in the boot-up scripts).
  This can be verified with 'cat /proc/devices'. It should
  have a line under Block devices:
  <major> <name of cdrom driver>

  In the /dev directory there have to be these descriptors:
  br--------   1 cduser   user <major>,   0 Jan 23  1995 <cdrom device 1>
  br--------   1 cduser   user <major>,   1 Mar 24  1993 <cdrom device 2>
  etc...

  a link named 'cdrom' to the cdrom drive used will speed up the
  process of finding the cdrom (cdparanoia checks for the link first)

  These steps are usually performed automatically during the
  installation of Linux.

(for ATAPI cdrom drives using SG_IO support)

  There's nothing much to do; make sure the kernel is actually
  compiled with SG_IO enabled, the appropriate drive entry appears in
  /dev/, and that the device is r/w accessible by the user.  In modern
  distros, all these steps are automagic.

(for ATAPI cdrom drives using IDE-SCSI host adaptor emulation)

  Overall, the instructions are the same as for normal SCSI drives.
  To cause the CDROM drive to appear as a SCSI device instead of ATAPI,
  the kernel must be compiled *with* SCSI and generic SCSI support, and
  *without* IDE CDROM drive (ATAPI) support.  If native ATAPI support is
  enabled, the kernel will always choose to use the native ATAPI driver.

Missing Features:
==================

Specifically, 'cdparanoia' will not play to sound cards, do MD5
signatures, do rate reduction, or generally make use of the maximum
speed available from a CDROM drive.  If your CDROM drive is *not*
prone to jitter and you don't have scratched discs to worry about,
look into Heiko's original cdda2wav.

Troubleshooting
===============

lots o' stuff on the website.

Contacts
========

The user and troubleshooting mailing list is paranoia@xiph.org.  The main distribution site
for cdparanoia (and the original Paranoia patches to cdda2wav) is
http://www.xiph.org/paranoia/

Happy hunting.  Be nice to copyrights.

Monty