File: COMMENTS

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chronicle 4.4-1
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  Chronicle supports the submission of comments upon published posts,
 via an optional CGI script.

  This document describes how you would go about enabling this support.



Introduction
------------

  The basic use of chronicle is to convert a collection of text files
 into a HTML & RSS blog.

  There are two ways this software is typically used:

   Single Machine
   --------------
     The blog input is stored upon your web-server and you generate
    the output directly to a http-accessible directory upon that
    machine.

   Multiple Machines
   -----------------
     The blog input lives upon one machine, and once you've generated
    the output you copy it over to a remote web-server where it may
    be viewed.

  Depending upon which of these ways you use the software the
 comment support will need to be handled differently.



Common Setup
------------

  Install the included file comments.cgi upon the web-server
 which hosts the blog, and adjust the settings at the start of that
 file to specify:

   1.  The local directory to save the comments within.

   2.  The source and destination email addresses to use for
      notification purposes.



Single Machine
--------------

   If you have only a single machine then you may configure the
  comments.cgi script to save the comments in text files directly
  within your blog tree.

   Assuming you have something like this:

    comments/
      A directory to contain the comments.
      NOTE:  You will need to ensure your web-server has the permissions
      to save files to this directory.

    data/
      The directory where your blog posts are loaded from.


   You may then regenerate your blog via:

     chronicle --input=./date/  --comments=./comments/ --output=/var/www/blog/

   This will ensure that the comments saved by your web-server into the
  comments directory are included in the (re)generated blog.




Multiple Machines
-----------------

  If you have the blog input files upon machine "local" and the
 hosted blog upon the machine "remote" then you will run into
 problems:

   1.  The comments are saved by your web-server to a local directory
      upon the machine "remote".

   2.  To rebuild the blog upon your local machine, "local", you must
      have those files.

  The solution is to generate your blog in a three-step process:

   1.  Copy the comment files, if any from "remote" to "local".

   2.  Rebuild the blog.

   3.  Upload the built blog.

  With the "pre-build" and "post-build" arguments to chronicle
 you can automate this:

 chronicle \
   --pre-build="rsync -varz user@remote:/path/to/comments comments/" \
   --comments=./comments \
   --output=./output \
   --post-build="rsync -vazr ./output user@remote:/path/to/location"



Spam Filtering
--------------

  In the modern world many blogs will receive comments which are
 just spam, and not related to your content at all.

  My solution to this is to use an email spam filter upon the
 comments.  So my comments are saved to a directory, and later
 tested automatically.  If they are non-spam they are kept, if
 they are spam they are deleted.

  You might need to do something similar for your own installation.

Steve
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