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chrony 1.10-3
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This is the README for chrony.

What is chrony?
===============
Chrony is a pair of programs for maintaining the accuracy of computer
clocks.

chronyd is a (background) daemon program that can be started at boot
time.  This does most of the work.

chronyc is a command-line interface program which can be used to
monitor chronyd's performance and to change various operating
parateters whilst it is running.

chronyd's main function is to obtain measurements of the true (UTC)
time from one of several sources, and correct the system clock
accordingly.  It also works out the rate at which the system clock
gains or loses time and uses this information to keep it accurate
between measurements from the reference.

The reference time can be derived from either NTP servers (preferred),
or wristwatch-and-keyboard (via chronyc).

It is designed so that it can work on computers which only have
intermittent access to reference sources, for example computers which
use a dial-up account to access the Internet.  Of course, it will work
on computers with permanent connections too.

In addition, the Linux 2.0.x version (for x >= 32) can monitor the
system's real time clock performance, so the system can maintain
accurate time even across reboots.

Typical accuracies available between 2 machines are

On an ethernet LAN : 100-200 microseconds, often much better
On a V32bis dial-up modem connection : 10's of milliseconds (from one
session to the next)

chronyd can also operate as an RFC1305-compatible NTP server and peer.


What will chrony run on?
========================

Chrony can be successfully built and run on

1. Linux v2.0.x (i386)

Linux 1.2.13 may work - the code has support but I haven't access to
anything to test it on. There is support for some patchlevels of Linux
2.1, but not the more recent ones - I haven't got access to a source
tree to check certain details.

2. Solaris 2.5/2.5.1 (Sparc 20 and Ultrasparc).

3. SunOS 4.1.4 (Sparc 2 and Sparc 20)

4. BSD/386 v1.1 has been reported to work using the SunOS 4.1 driver.

Any other system will require a porting exercise.  You would need to
start from one of the existing system-specific drivers and look into
the quirks of certain system calls and the kernel on your target
system.  (This is described in the manual).


How do I set it up?
===================

The file INSTALL gives instructions.  On supported systems the
compilation process should be automatic.

You will need an ANSI C compiler -- gcc is recommended.  Versions
2.7.2/2.7.2.2 are known to work.

The manual (in texinfo and Postscript formats) describes how to set
the software up for the less straightforward cases.

What documentation is there?
============================

A manual is supplied in Texinfo format (chrony.texi) and
ready-formatted Postscript for A4 paper (chrony-a4.ps) in the
distribution.

There is also information available on my web page,

http://www.curnow.demon.co.uk/chrony/index.html

What can chrony not do?
=======================

Compared to the `reference' RFC1305 implementation xntpd, chronyd does
not support hardware reference clocks, leap seconds or broadcast
modes.


How can I contact the author?
=============================

You can email me at <richard@curnow.demon.co.uk>.  It would be nice
if:

- you include the word 'chrony' in the subject line (so my mail reader
can sort my mail by topic)

- you don't send complete log files, encoded binaries etc, without
editing such material down to just the relevant bits - a few tens of
lines at most.  (My dial-up connection handles large messages rather
slowly ...).