File: INSTALL.linux

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Note that Debian and Ubuntu how have packages for libconcord and we recommend
you use those instead of installing from source. If you prefer to install from
source, see the instructions below.


==== BASIC INSTALLATION ====

0. INSTALL REQUIRED SOFTWARE

You *MUST* install libusb and libzip. These libraries are in most
distributions, so apt-get/yum/up2date/urpmi/etc. it.

You also need hidapi which can be found at: https://github.com/signal11/hidapi
It is important that you use git, as the last release (0.7.0) doesn't work.
You'll want to build it as a shared library, which is basically just
"./bootstrap && ./configure --prefix=/usr && make && sudo make install",
tweaked to your taste.

NOTE ON HIDAPI TO DISTRIBUTORS: If your distro doesn't distribute hidapi, for
the next few releases we are still supporting building directly on libusb with
the --enable-force-libusb-on-linux option to configure. However, the libusb
developers are strongly encouraging libusb who talk to HID devices to move to
hidapi, so it's probably a good time to package hidapi. Finally, if that
doesn't work for you, you can drop in the appropriate hid.c file from the
hidapi source into the libconcord, and tweak the Makefile.am to build it as
part of libconcord.

Also, if you are using 900/1000/1100 remotes, then dnsmasq is a requirement,
as well as installing the udev support files for libconcord (see below).

If you're compiling libconcord from source, you'll also need the development
packages - usually libusb-dev or libusb-devel (and libzip-dev/libzip-devel),
depending on your distribution.

1. BUILD LIBCONCORD

   As a normal user...
     A. ***IF**** You are building from git, run:
        mkdir m4; autoreconf --install
     B. Run "./configure"
     C. Run "make"

Various options, such as '--prefix' are available to the configure script to
help you choose where software gets installed and how it is built.

2. INSTALL THE SOFTWARE

As root, simply run "make install"

3. INSTALL UDEV/CONSOLEKIT/POLICYKIT SUPPORT (OPTIONAL)

If you don't want to have to be root to use concordance (or any other
libconcord frontend), you'll need to set up udev-acl, hal/consolekit, 
hal/policykit or old udev support. Here are your options:

* UDEV-ACL SUPPORT (recommended)

Most modern distributions should use the udev-acl support. udev versions since
167, released on 2011-03-30, have the necessary support for this method to
work.

With this option, all locally logged-in users will be able to have access
to the remote control, but remote users (such as those logged in via ssh or
fast user switching) will not. This support does not depend on anything beyond
a sufficiently recent version of udev itself. To use the udev-acl support, do:

  make udev
  sudo make install_udev

* GENERIC-UDEV SUPPORT

If you have a modern system, but your login manager doesn't support
consolekit, (notably, 'xdm'), you'll need to use generic udev support. With
this option, anyone in the group 'dialout' will have access to the remote
control. To use this, do:

  make generic_udev
  sudo make install_generic_udev

* HAL/POLICYKIT SUPPORT

This is for people on older distributions that use HAL+PolicyKit. It will
generate the appropriate HAL/PolicyKit files and install them in the right
place for the console user to have access to the remote when it's plugged in.
It will work only if your distribution has udev, HAL and PolicyKit of around
the correct vintage - approximately, the versions that were current in early
2009 - correctly built to work with each other.

To use hal/policykit support, you can do:

  make policykit
  sudo make install_policykit

* HAL/CONSOLEKIT SUPPORT

This will do much the same as the hal/policykit support does, only with
consolekit instead. As with the hal/policykit support, it depends on having
udev, HAL and ConsoleKit of an early 2009 vintage, correctly built to work
together.

* OLD_UDEV SUPPORT

The safest option for old systems is the old generic udev support.  Like
"UDEV-GENERIC", this will allow anyone in the "dialout" group to read and
write to harmony remote controls connected to the machine. However, it uses
the syntax necessary for very old versions of udev.

  make old_udev
  sudo make install_old_udev

If you are not sure which method to use, and your distribution came out since
March 2011, try the udev-acl option first, as it provides the cleanest
configuration and most transparent operation. If it does not work, you can try
the hal/consolekit or hal/policykit options, but old-udev is the most likely
to work.

NOTE:
By default udev files will install in /lib/udev. You can override this by setting
the UDEVLIBDIR environment variable (as root):

  UDEVLIBDIR=/etc/udev make install_udev

The policykit/consolekit files will install in datarootdir which is a subset
of prefix, meaning, by default /usr/local/share. This will not work, so if you
are using the hal/policykit/console kit targets, you must run ./configure
with:
*either*:
  --prefix=/usr
*or*:
  --sysconfigdir=/etc --datarootdir=/usr/share

The first one will install binaries in /usr/bin and libraries in /usr/lib which
may potentially conflict with files installed by your distribution. The later
will leave everything in /usr/local except for the udev/policykit/consolekit
files.


==== ADDITIONAL NOTES ====

Because this software uses libusb, it does Direct IO. That means the library
requires root priveleges to talk to the remote control, or the user
must have the RAWIO capability. You can work around this with the optional
step 3 above.

In addition, libconcord attempts to unbind any in-kernel drivers that may
bind to your remote. However, if it can't, you may need to unbind them manually.
Check dmesg, if the hid driver attached to your Harmony follow the
instructions here to unbind it:
   http://lwn.net/Articles/143397/


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