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<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
    "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en">
  <head>
    <title>Running the Programs</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <h1>Running the Programs</h1>
    <p>
      In this section, each script's functions and arguments are
      discussed. There is a set of common arguments that some of the
      scripts accept, and of course, each has its own idiosyncrasies,
      too.
    </p>
    <p>
      The following arguments are common to most of the components of
      Cricket.
    </p>
    <dl>
      <dt><tt>-logLevel</tt></dt>
      <dd>
        <p>
          Default value: <i>info</i> (except grapher.cgi, where it
          defaults to <i>warn</i>)
        </p>
        <p>
          The possible values are "error", "warn", "info", or
          "debug". Each setting includes the output created by any
          of the preceding settings. All diagnostic output goes to
          the standard error stream.
        </p>
      </dd>
      <dt><tt>-base</tt></dt>
      <dd>
        <p>Default value: <i>$HOME/cricket-config</i></p>
        <p>
          You can use this setting to use a different config tree.
          Experience shows, however, that it's simplest to just
          accept the defaults and install Cricket in an account of
          its own.
        </p>
      </dd>
    </dl>
    <p>
      Here's a brief description of each program, and what arguments
      it takes.
    </p>
    <dl>
      <dt><tt>collector</tt></dt>
      <dd>
        <p>
          Collector is the script that runs every five minutes
          from cron in order to traverse the config tree, fetch
          data, and enter it into the RRD files. It's also used
          interactively to test configurations, and to convert
          old-style RRD files to RRD 1.x.x files.
        </p>
        <p>
          The collector will process only the subtrees listed on
          the command line, unless there are none, in which case
          it will process the entire config tree.
        </p>
        <p>
          Except during testing, collector is usually run from
          collect-subtrees, which takes care of creating the huge
          command lines collector sometimes needs, and does other
          housekeeping jobs.  When testing a new subtree of the
          config-tree, you can use a command like
          "$HOME/cricket/collector -logLevel debug /new-tree".
          Once you are certain the subtree is functioning
          correctly, you can add it to the collect-subtrees config
          file, and rely on collect-subtrees to run the collector
          for you.
        </p>
        <p>
          The collector will always run in two stages: collecting
          the data and checking thresholds for monitoring. If you
          for some reason do not need or want the threshold
          monitoring, you can specify the <tt>-skipMonitor</tt>
          option. Good reasons not to run this second phase
          include:
        </p>
        <ul>
          <li>
            Cricket is first run, or has been down for more that
            your heartbeat interval, and you want to avoid
            threshold alarms because of NaN values.
          </li>
          <li>
            You don't use threshold monitoring at all and want
            to avoid the overhead of scanning for it.
          </li>
          <li>
            You run your collector more frequently than once
            every five minutes, and don't want the overhead for
            the "intermediate" runs.
          </li>
        </ul>
      </dd>
      <dt><tt>grapher.cgi</tt></dt>
      <dd>
        <p>Accepts common arguments.</p>
        <p>
          The grapher is almost never run from the command line,
          so options parsing is basically a moot point. The CGI
          script should get run by the web server automatically in
          response to accesses to files that end in CGI. Consult
          your web server documentation to find out how to make it
          work like this.
        </p>
        <p>
          Because it's not generally possible to control the
          command line of grapher.cgi, it's critical that it
          either defaults to the correct base directory, or that
          it has the base directory hardcoded internally to it.
          The default base directory is $HOME/cricket-config.
          However, $HOME will only be set right if Cricket can
          guess it's username from it's URL. If there's any doubt,
          you should hard code the base directory by editing the
          first few lines of grapher.cgi.
        </p>
      </dd>
      <dt><tt>configure</tt></dt>
      <dd>
        <p>Accepts no arguments at this time.</p>
        <p>
          This is basically a placeholder for when Cricket is more
          complicated (say it ain't so!) and requires an
          autoconf-generated configure script. At this point, it
          can point all the Cricket scripts at your Perl install,
          which is very helpful for sites which do not have Perl
          installed in a standard location.
        </p>
      </dd>
    </dl>

    <p>
      <a href="http://cricket.sourceforge.net">Cricket</a>
      version 1.0.5, released 2004-03-28.
    </p>
    <p>
      Copyright (C) 1998-2000 Jeff Allen. Cricket is released under
      the <a href="gpl.html">GNU General Public License</a>.
    </p>
  </body>
</html>