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dietlibc 0.34~cvs20160606-10
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  The system library is a challenge to all those using the computer to
  write their own faster and better routines or to bow to the superior
  strength and skill of a true master.
 	--http://www.inner.net/users/cmetz/program-like-a-klingon

Use diet libc to statically link programs that don't need all the bloat
from glibc.

malloc, printf and scanf contributed from Olaf Dreesen.

To compile:

	$ make

make should compile the diet libc itself.

When make is done, it will have created dietlibc.a in bin-i386 (or
bin-ppc, bin-alpha, bin-sparc, bin-ppc or bin-arm, depending on your
architecture).  In that directory you will also find a program called
"diet", which you need to copy in a directory in your $PATH:

	# install bin-i386/diet /usr/local/bin

Then you can compile programs by prepending diet to the command line,
i.e.

	$ diet gcc -s -Os -pipe -o t t.c

diet is cross-compiler friendly and can also be used like this:

	$ diet sparc-linux-gcc -o t t.c

diet will then link against dietlibc.a from bin-sparc, of course.
diet comes with a man page (diet.1), which you can copy to an
appropriate location, too:

	# cp diet.1 /usr/local/man/man1

After you compiled the diet libc successfully, I invite you to check out
the embedded utils (http://www.fefe.de/embutils/).  The embedded utils
are small replacements for common utilities like mv, chown, ls, and even
a small tar that can extract tar files.


The license for the diet libc is the GNU General Public License, version
2 (as included in the file COPYING) or later.