File: INSTALL

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dircproxy 1.0.3-1
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Installing and Configuring dircproxy
------------------------------------

dircproxy is designed to run on any modern UNIX system, and should
require little or no modification to work on yours.  The only
requisite it has is a modern libc with TCP/IP networking code.

I have seen or heard about it running on the following types
of system:
	Linux 2.x+ on i386 (Debian, RedHat, Slackware, etc)
        Linux 2.4+ on ia64 (TurboLinux)
        Solaris 2.5+
        FreeBSD 3.x, 4.x+
	NetBSD on a MicroVAX 3100 (yes, really!)
	Windows NT (with cygwin compiler)
	Mac OS X on G3 (you may need to configure with --host=darwin)

If (and you should) get it to work on any other type of system,
please e-mail me so I can it to this list.


Compiling dircproxy
===================

Installing dircproxy is fairly easy, and this overview will get it
up and running for you in no time.

You'll need to unpack the distribution file 'dircproxy-X.X.X.tar.gz'
(where X.X.X is the version number you have downloaded) somewhere on
your machine, if you don't know where to do it, your home directory
is a good bet.  (You've probably already done this to read this
file anyway!)

	$ gunzip -c dircproxy-X.X.X.tar.gz | tar xf -

This will place the source code for dircproxy in a directory called
'dircproxy-X.X.X'.  To compile the program, you should be in this
directory, so change to it now (again you've probably already
done this).

	$ cd dircproxy-X.X.X

You're now ready to begin.

dircproxy uses the GNU standard 'configure' program to examine your
system and find where required libraries and header files are.
Most of the time this needs little or no interaction to get it
to work.  You should be able to get away with the following command:

	$ ./configure

If it terminates with an error (it hopefully won't!) you should
be able to use its output to discover what it needs, and fix the
problem.  By default, dircproxy is installed under the '/usr/local'
hierarchy, if you wish to install it somewhere else you can pass
the '--prefix' option to the 'configure' script.  If you only wish
to run it from your home directory, don't worry about this bit,
it'll work for you with the default option.

'configure' accepts lots of other options, for more information
run it with the --help option, or see "Configuring the Compilation"
below.

If you want to tinker with some of the more advanced configuration
options of dircproxy, you can edit the src/dircproxy.h file at
this point.  This is not recommended unless you are an expert and
wish to change something specific.

You can now build the dircproxy binary, this is accomplished by
the following command:

	$ make

The dircproxy binary should now be in the src directory.  If you
only want to run it from your home directory, copy it somewhere
sensible and skip down to "Configuring dircproxy" below.

Otherwise, if you want to install dircproxy so it is available for
anyone on the machine to use, then you will need to install it.
You will most-likely need to switch to the 'root' user, either
by using your system's 'su' command, or by logging in as 'root'
onto another terminal.  Once you are 'root', go to the dircproxy
source directory (if necessary) and issue the following command:

	# make install

The default binaries have debugging symbols left in them as this
tends to be more useful than not.  If you're tight on disk-space,
you can install 'stripped' versions of the binaries without these
debugging symbols by using the following command instead:

	# make install-strip


Configuring dircproxy
=====================

dircproxy requires a configuration file in order to run.  This
configuration file includes information on who can use the proxy
and other options such as log file locations etc.

An example file is in the 'conf' directory of the source code, and
is called 'dircproxyrc'.  If you installed using 'make install',
then it will also be available for you and other users in the
'/usr/local/share/dircproxy' directory.

This file contains documentation on each of the configuration
options.  It is recommended that to create your configuration file,
you copy the example and edit it, rather than simply writing your
own from scratch.

Exactly where you copy it depends on how you wish to run dircproxy.
If you are going to be running it as a daemon on your system, for
many people to use simultaneously, then '/usr/local/etc/dircproxyrc'
is the recommended location.  If you want to run it under your
own user account, then '~/.dircproxyrc' is the best location.
dircproxy automatically looks at these two locations for the config
file, if you don't like either of them, then place the configuration
file wherever you want and tell dircproxy using the '-f' command-line
parameter, for example:

	$ dircproxy -f ./dircproxyrc


Configuring the Compilation
===========================

If have problems compiling dircproxy, or wish to customise the
compilation, then you can pass various options to the 'configure'
script to hopefully do you want you want.

There are a large number of possible arguments, and only the more
useful ones are documented here.

'--help'
	Print a summary of all the options available.

'--prefix=DIR'
	This is the root directory dircproxy is installed under
	when you do a 'make install'.  The default is '/usr/local'.

'--enable-debug'
	Enables the dircproxy debug mode, only useful if you want to
	help fix a bug you've found.  Not recommended for normal use.


If compilation fails for any reason, you can pass shell variables
to the 'configure' script to tell it about your system.  A complete
list of these variables can be found in the 'autoconf' documentation
if you have it.  You can do that on the command-line in a sh-like
shell (such as bash) like this:

	$ CC=c89 CFLAGS=-O2 LIBS=-lposix ./configure

Or on systems that have the 'env' program, you can do it like this:
     env CPPFLAGS=-I/usr/local/include LDFLAGS=-s ./configure


Copyright (C) 2002 Scott James Remnant <scott@netsplit.com>.
All Rights Reserved.