File: README.inetd

package info (click to toggle)
dircproxy 1.0.5-5
  • links: PTS
  • area: main
  • in suites: etch-m68k
  • size: 1,120 kB
  • ctags: 740
  • sloc: ansic: 9,466; sh: 2,946; makefile: 113; perl: 70
file content (38 lines) | stat: -rw-r--r-- 1,564 bytes parent folder | download | duplicates (7)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
Running dircproxy from inetd
----------------------------

If you are so inclined, you can run dircproxy from the standard
UNIX inetd daemon.  This means you can do things like wrap it with
tcpd etc and add all your own perverse security restrictions on top.
However you loose the automatic ability to detach and reattach to
your session, which makes it slightly more inconvenient to use.


To run from inetd add a line to /etc/services for the port you
want to listen on, and give it a service name of "dircproxy".
This is actually good practice anyway.

dircproxy	57000/tcp		# Detchable IRC Proxy


Now add a line to /etc/inetd.conf for dircproxy.  You'll need to
decide a username to run dircproxy as, "nobody" will probably do,
don't run dircproxy as "root" unless you plan to use the
"switch_user" configuration directive!  Also change the PATH/TO
to point to where you installed dircproxy.  The -I parameter tells
it its running from inetd.  You can specify any other options here,
such as to specify the configuration file (dircproxy will only
check the system-wide configuration file when running under inetd).

dircproxy  stream  tcp  nowait  USERNAME  /PATH/TO/dircproxy  dircproxy -I


You can connect to it as normal, however when you disconnect you will
be disconnected from IRC too, and won't be able to reattach to your
session.  To keep your session connected use the /DIRCPROXY PERSIT
command.  This will tell you which port you can reconnect to your
session at.


Copyright (C) 2002 Scott James Remnant <scott@netsplit.com>.
All Rights Reserved.