File: vars.example

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# Easy-RSA 3 parameter settings

# NOTE: If you installed Easy-RSA from your distro's package manager, don't edit
# this file in place -- instead, you should copy the entire easy-rsa directory
# to another location so future upgrades don't wipe out your changes.

# HOW TO USE THIS FILE
#
# vars.example contains built-in examples to Easy-RSA settings. You MUST name
# this file 'vars' if you want it to be used as a configuration file. If you do
# not, it WILL NOT be automatically read when you call easyrsa commands.
#
# It is not necessary to use this config file unless you wish to change
# operational defaults. These defaults should be fine for many uses without the
# need to copy and edit the 'vars' file.
#
# All of the editable settings are shown commented and start with the command
# 'set_var' -- this means any set_var command that is uncommented has been
# modified by the user. If you're happy with a default, there is no need to
# define the value to its default.

# NOTES FOR WINDOWS USERS
#
# Paths for Windows  *MUST* use forward slashes, or optionally double-esscaped
# backslashes (single forward slashes are recommended.) This means your path to
# the openssl binary might look like this:
# "C:/Program Files/OpenSSL-Win32/bin/openssl.exe"

# A little housekeeping: DON'T EDIT THIS SECTION
# 
# Easy-RSA 3.x doesn't source into the environment directly.
# Complain if a user tries to do this:
if [ -z "$EASYRSA_CALLER" ]; then
	echo "You appear to be sourcing an Easy-RSA 'vars' file." >&2
	echo "This is no longer necessary and is disallowed. See the section called" >&2
	echo "'How to use this file' near the top comments for more details." >&2
	return 1
fi

# DO YOUR EDITS BELOW THIS POINT

# This variable is used as the base location of configuration files needed by
# easyrsa.  More specific variables for specific files (e.g., EASYRSA_SSL_CONF)
# may override this default.
#
# The default value of this variable is the location of the easyrsa script
# itself, which is also where the configuration files are located in the
# easy-rsa tree.

#set_var EASYRSA	"${0%/*}"

# If your OpenSSL command is not in the system PATH, you will need to define the
# path to it here. Normally this means a full path to the executable, otherwise
# you could have left it undefined here and the shown default would be used.
#
# Windows users, remember to use paths with forward-slashes (or escaped
# back-slashes.) Windows users should declare the full path to the openssl
# binary here if it is not in their system PATH.

#set_var EASYRSA_OPENSSL	"openssl"
#
# This sample is in Windows syntax -- edit it for your path if not using PATH:
#set_var EASYRSA_OPENSSL	"C:/Program Files/OpenSSL-Win32/bin/openssl.exe"

# Edit this variable to point to your soon-to-be-created key directory.  By
# default, this will be "$PWD/pki" (i.e. the "pki" subdirectory of the
# directory you are currently in).
#
# WARNING: init-pki will do a rm -rf on this directory so make sure you define
# it correctly! (Interactive mode will prompt before acting.)

#set_var EASYRSA_PKI		"$PWD/pki"

# Define X509 DN mode.
# This is used to adjust what elements are included in the Subject field as the DN
# (this is the "Distinguished Name.")
# Note that in cn_only mode the Organizational fields further below aren't used.
#
# Choices are:
#   cn_only  - use just a CN value
#   org      - use the "traditional" Country/Province/City/Org/OU/email/CN format

#set_var EASYRSA_DN	"cn_only"

# Organizational fields (used with 'org' mode and ignored in 'cn_only' mode.)
# These are the default values for fields which will be placed in the
# certificate.  Don't leave any of these fields blank, although interactively
# you may omit any specific field by typing the "." symbol (not valid for
# email.)

#set_var EASYRSA_REQ_COUNTRY	"US"
#set_var EASYRSA_REQ_PROVINCE	"California"
#set_var EASYRSA_REQ_CITY	"San Francisco"
#set_var EASYRSA_REQ_ORG	"Copyleft Certificate Co"
#set_var EASYRSA_REQ_EMAIL	"me@example.net"
#set_var EASYRSA_REQ_OU		"My Organizational Unit"

# Choose a size in bits for your keypairs. The recommended value is 2048.  Using
# 2048-bit keys is considered more than sufficient for many years into the
# future. Larger keysizes will slow down TLS negotiation and make key/DH param
# generation take much longer. Values up to 4096 should be accepted by most
# software. Only used when the crypto alg is rsa (see below.)

#set_var EASYRSA_KEY_SIZE	2048

# The default crypto mode is rsa; ec can enable elliptic curve support.
# Note that not all software supports ECC, so use care when enabling it.
# Choices for crypto alg are: (each in lower-case)
#  * rsa
#  * ec

#set_var EASYRSA_ALGO		rsa

# Define the named curve, used in ec mode only:

#set_var EASYRSA_CURVE		secp384r1

# In how many days should the root CA key expire?

#set_var EASYRSA_CA_EXPIRE	3650

# In how many days should certificates expire?

#set_var EASYRSA_CERT_EXPIRE	1080

# How many days until the next CRL publish date?  Note that the CRL can still be
# parsed after this timeframe passes. It is only used for an expected next
# publication date.

# How many days before its expiration date a certificate is allowed to be
# renewed?
#set_var EASYRSA_CERT_RENEW	30

#set_var EASYRSA_CRL_DAYS	180

# Support deprecated "Netscape" extensions? (choices "yes" or "no".) The default
# is "no" to discourage use of deprecated extensions. If you require this
# feature to use with --ns-cert-type, set this to "yes" here. This support
# should be replaced with the more modern --remote-cert-tls feature.  If you do
# not use --ns-cert-type in your configs, it is safe (and recommended) to leave
# this defined to "no".  When set to "yes", server-signed certs get the
# nsCertType=server attribute, and also get any NS_COMMENT defined below in the
# nsComment field.

#set_var EASYRSA_NS_SUPPORT	"no"

# When NS_SUPPORT is set to "yes", this field is added as the nsComment field.
# Set this blank to omit it. With NS_SUPPORT set to "no" this field is ignored.

#set_var EASYRSA_NS_COMMENT	"Easy-RSA Generated Certificate"

# A temp file used to stage cert extensions during signing. The default should
# be fine for most users; however, some users might want an alternative under a
# RAM-based FS, such as /dev/shm or /tmp on some systems.

#set_var EASYRSA_TEMP_FILE	"$EASYRSA_PKI/extensions.temp"

# !!
# NOTE: ADVANCED OPTIONS BELOW THIS POINT
# PLAY WITH THEM AT YOUR OWN RISK
# !!

# Broken shell command aliases: If you have a largely broken shell that is
# missing any of these POSIX-required commands used by Easy-RSA, you will need
# to define an alias to the proper path for the command.  The symptom will be
# some form of a 'command not found' error from your shell. This means your
# shell is BROKEN, but you can hack around it here if you really need. These
# shown values are not defaults: it is up to you to know what you're doing if
# you touch these.
#
#alias awk="/alt/bin/awk"
#alias cat="/alt/bin/cat"

# X509 extensions directory:
# If you want to customize the X509 extensions used, set the directory to look
# for extensions here. Each cert type you sign must have a matching filename,
# and an optional file named 'COMMON' is included first when present. Note that
# when undefined here, default behaviour is to look in $EASYRSA_PKI first, then
# fallback to $EASYRSA for the 'x509-types' dir.  You may override this
# detection with an explicit dir here.
#
#set_var EASYRSA_EXT_DIR	"$EASYRSA/x509-types"

# OpenSSL config file:
# If you need to use a specific openssl config file, you can reference it here.
# Normally this file is auto-detected from a file named openssl-easyrsa.cnf from the
# EASYRSA_PKI or EASYRSA dir (in that order.) NOTE that this file is Easy-RSA
# specific and you cannot just use a standard config file, so this is an
# advanced feature.

#set_var EASYRSA_SSL_CONF	"$EASYRSA/openssl-easyrsa.cnf"

# Default CN:
# This is best left alone. Interactively you will set this manually, and BATCH
# callers are expected to set this themselves.

#set_var EASYRSA_REQ_CN		"ChangeMe"

# Cryptographic digest to use.
# Do not change this default unless you understand the security implications.
# Valid choices include: md5, sha1, sha256, sha224, sha384, sha512

#set_var EASYRSA_DIGEST		"sha256"

# Batch mode. Leave this disabled unless you intend to call Easy-RSA explicitly
# in batch mode without any user input, confirmation on dangerous operations,
# or most output. Setting this to any non-blank string enables batch mode.

#set_var EASYRSA_BATCH		""