File: perf_test

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ebtables 2.0.11-4
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#!/bin/bash
#
# The ebtablesu/ebtablesd programs are deprecated,
# they're mostly useful for debugging ebtables in daemon
# mode. For fast population of tables, use ebtables-restore.
# You should probably just ignore this script.
#
# This script can be used to compare the speed of
# the different methods for adding rules in ebtables
# chains.
#
# Apart from the standard method of adding rules with
# the ebtables tool, rules can be added (faster) with
# ebtablesd running in the background and accepting
# commands through a pipe. The pipe can be written to
# with the standard shell tools. The only restriction is
# that spaces are only used to separate options and
# commands, i.e. spaces are not allowed in strings, even
# if they are between "". E.g.
# ebtablesu -A --log-prefix "a space"
# is not allowed, however
# ebtablesu -A --log-prefix "a_space"
# is allowed.
#
# Author: Bart De Schuymer
#

export PIPE=/tmp/ebtables-v2.0.7/ebtablesd_pipe
export EBTABLES=/usr/local/sbin/ebtables
export EBTABLESD=/usr/local/sbin/ebtablesd
export EBTABLESU=/usr/local/sbin/ebtablesu

if [[ $# = 0 ]]
then

rm -f iets niets iets.out niets.out
MAXLIMIT=10000
for ((LIMIT=10; LIMIT <= MAXLIMIT; LIMIT *= 10)) do
  killall ebtablesd 2>/dev/null
  $EBTABLES --init-table
  export LIMIT
  time $0 1
  echo "added" $LIMIT "rules with echo"
  $EBTABLES --atomic-file iets --atomic-save
  $EBTABLES -F
  time $0 2
  echo "added" $LIMIT "rules with ebtables"
  $EBTABLES --atomic-file niets --atomic-save
  $EBTABLES --atomic-file iets -L > iets.out
  $EBTABLES --atomic-file niets -L > niets.out
  diff -purN iets.out niets.out
  rm -f niets niets.out
  killall ebtablesd 2>/dev/null
  $EBTABLES -F
  time $0 3
  echo "added" $LIMIT "rules with ebtablesu"
  $EBTABLES --atomic-file niets --atomic-save
  $EBTABLES --atomic-file iets -L > iets.out
  $EBTABLES --atomic-file niets -L > niets.out
  diff -purN iets.out niets.out
  rm -f niets niets.out
  time $0 4
  echo "added" $LIMIT "rules with atomic-file"
  $EBTABLES --atomic-file niets --atomic-save
  $EBTABLES --atomic-file niets -L > niets.out
  diff -purN iets.out niets.out
  rm -f niets niets.out
  time $0 5
  echo "added" $LIMIT "rules with one atomic-commit"
  $EBTABLES --atomic-file niets --atomic-save
  $EBTABLES --atomic-file niets -L > niets.out
  diff -purN iets.out niets.out
  rm -f iets iets.out niets niets.out
done

elif [[ $1 = "1" ]]
then

$EBTABLESD &
pid=`jobs -p '$EBTABLESD'`
sleep 1
$EBTABLESU open filter
# Add rules with ebtablesd
echo "$EBTABLESU -F" >>$PIPE
for ((a=1; a <= LIMIT; a++)) do
  echo "$EBTABLESU -A FORWARD" >>$PIPE
done
$EBTABLESU commit filter
$EBTABLESU quit
wait $pid

elif [[ $1 = "2" ]]
then

# Add rules with ebtables
for ((a=1; a <= LIMIT; a++))
do
  $EBTABLES -A FORWARD
done

elif [[ $1 = "3" ]]
then

$EBTABLESD &
pid=`jobs -p '$EBTABLESD'`
sleep 1
$EBTABLESU open filter
# Add rules with ebtablesu
for ((a=1; a <= LIMIT; a++))
do
  $EBTABLESU -A FORWARD
done
$EBTABLESU commit filter
$EBTABLESU quit
wait $pid

elif [[ $1 = "4" ]]
then

# Add rules with ebtables --atomic-file
$EBTABLES --atomic-file niets --atomic-init
for ((a=1; a <= LIMIT; a++))
do
  $EBTABLES --atomic-file niets -A FORWARD
done
$EBTABLES --atomic-file niets --atomic-commit

else

# Add rules taken from a binary file containing a saved table
$EBTABLES --atomic-file iets --atomic-commit

fi


# From the results below, we can conclude the following about
# table constructions when speed is an issue.
# For first-time fast construction of tables, it's best to use the
#   echo + ebtablesd method. If the echo method is unwanted, it
#   is best to use the ebtablesu + ebtablesd method.
#   The echo method is much faster because echo is a bash
#   built-in command.
#   Perhaps intialize the kernel tables to empty chains with
#   policy DROP before constructing the table in userspace.
# For construction of tables that were constructed earlier, it
#   is best to save those constructed tables to a binary file
#   and then use --atomic-commit to get the table in the kernel
#   (this is lightning fast compared with the other methods).
#
# System specs:
# processor       : 0
# vendor_id       : AuthenticAMD
# cpu family      : 6
# model           : 4
# model name      : AMD Athlon(tm) processor
# stepping        : 4
# cpu MHz         : 1000.592
# cache size      : 256 KB
# MemTotal        : 515780 kB
#
####10 rules####
#
# real    0m0.078s
# user    0m0.030s
# sys     0m0.045s
# added 10 rules with echo
#
# real    0m0.098s
# user    0m0.031s
# sys     0m0.063s
# added 10 rules with ebtables
#
# real    0m0.275s
# user    0m0.083s
# sys     0m0.188s
# added 10 rules with ebtablesu
#
# real    0m0.279s
# user    0m0.082s
# sys     0m0.192s
# added 10 rules with atomic-file
#
# real    0m0.017s
# user    0m0.009s
# sys     0m0.008s
# added 10 rules with one atomic-commit
#
# real    0m0.095s
# user    0m0.050s
# sys     0m0.043s
# added 100 rules with echo
#
# real    0m0.936s
# user    0m0.315s
# sys     0m0.587s
# added 100 rules with ebtables
#
# real    0m1.967s
# user    0m0.449s
# sys     0m1.479s
# added 100 rules with ebtablesu
#
# real    0m2.472s
# user    0m0.745s
# sys     0m1.660s
# added 100 rules with atomic-file
#
# real    0m0.018s
# user    0m0.006s
# sys     0m0.012s
# added 100 rules with one atomic-commit
#
# real    0m0.740s
# user    0m0.461s
# sys     0m0.265s
# added 1000 rules with echo
#
# real    0m12.471s
# user    0m4.423s
# sys     0m7.828s
# added 1000 rules with ebtables
#
# real    0m17.715s
# user    0m6.814s
# sys     0m10.604s
# added 1000 rules with ebtablesu
#
# real    0m28.176s
# user    0m8.875s
# sys     0m18.704s
# added 1000 rules with atomic-file
#
# real    0m0.025s
# user    0m0.015s
# sys     0m0.010s
# added 1000 rules with one atomic-commit
#
# real    1m11.474s
# user    1m9.662s
# sys     0m1.035s
# added 10000 rules with echo
#
# real    10m9.418s
# user    4m19.163s
# sys     5m37.548s
# added 10000 rules with ebtables
#
# real    2m32.119s
# user    1m38.085s
# sys     0m52.298s
# added 10000 rules with ebtablesu
#
# real    13m23.396s
# user    5m29.770s
# sys     6m44.598s
# added 10000 rules with atomic-file
#
# real    0m0.319s
# user    0m0.037s
# sys     0m0.057s
# added 10000 rules with one atomic-commit