File: Install.eng

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fdclone 3.01b-1
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[HOW TO INSTALL FDCLONE3]


- In Case of UNIX

1. In machine.h, you can find the part which is commented out.
   Then you will move the "/*" on beginning of the line to the
   place before ';' after it, referring to an attached comment
   content.
   Especially, in the following four configurations,
   the administrator sometimes setups differently from the
   OS default setups. Then you must be careful to select.
	CODEEUC		This OS uses the EUC-JP Kanji code.
			(If undefined, it means Shift JIS is used.)
	DEFKCODE	The string which specifies the Kanji
			code used as OS standard.
	UTF8DOC		This OS uses UTF-8 as the Kanji code
			for documents.
	UTF8LANG	The string which specifies the Kanji
			code used as OS standard, if the
			environment variable LANG includes
			"UTF".
	TARUSESPACE	tar(1) with t option will output the
			list in which each file mode string
			is always followed by spaces.
   In the following OS, there is need to change nothing except
   these two configurations. If you force to change anything,
   you will fail. So, you should go to the next step.
	Sun	SunOS		(5.x)
	(free)	Cygwin		(1.5.x, 1.6.x, 1.7.x)
	(free)	Linux		(2.x)
	(free)	FreeBSD		(2.x, 3.x, 4.x, 5.x, 6.x)
	(free)	MINIX		(3.x)
	Google	Android		(1.x, 2.x, 3.x, 4.x)
	Apple	Mac OS X	(10.x)

   In the following OS, the codes for these OS are described
   while it is not confirmed whether if Ver. 3.01 will be
   running normally. Then you seem to need no change.
   At least, if you can compile it with no change, it seems
   that any changes are not necessary.
	Sun	SunOS		(4.1.x)
	SONY	NEWS-OS		(3.2, 4.x, 6.x)
	SGI	IRIX		(R4.0.5, R5.x, R6.x)
	HP	HP-UX		(9.x, 10.01, 11.x)
	HITACHI	HI-UX/WE2	(01-x, 02-01, 04-02)
	NEC	EWS-UX/V(Rel4.x)(R5.3, R7.1, R8.1, R9.1, R10.1, R12.3, R13.1)
	OMRON	UniOS-U		(Ver3.00)
	OMRON	UniOS-B		(2.00)
	OMRON	Luna/Mach	(2.5)
	DEC	OSF/1		(V1.2, V2.0, V3.2, V4.x, V5.x)
	DEC	ULTRIX		(V4.x)
	IBM	AIX		(3.x, 4.x)
	Apple	A/UX		(3.0)
	DG	DG/UX		(5.4)
	Fujitsu	UXP/M		(4.0, 4.1)
	Fujitsu	UXP/DS		(V10, V20)
	Mips	RISC/os		(4.x, 5.0x)
	NeXT	NEXTSTEP	(3.0)
	(free)	386BSD		(R0.1)
	(free)	NetBSD		(1.x, 2.x, 3.x, 4.x, 5.x)
	(free)	OpenBSD		(2.x, 3.x, 4.x, 5.x)
	BSDI	BSD/OS		(1.1, 2.x, 3.0)
	JCC	4.4BSD-Lite	(v1.0)
	ASCII	BSD on Windows	(1.0, 1.5)

   In the other OS which is not listed in both these lists,
   the program which judges the OS environment is prepared,
   and you can do "make config" to build the configuration
   file.
   But, this automatic judgment is not perfect. If you can
   not compile it, you must manually edit config.h which
   is built by "make config". And you can refer TECHKNOW.eng
   for the detail of changes.

   Reversely, in the OS which is listed in either of above
   lists, don't do "make config" because "make config" may
   sometimes cause rather unsuitable result.
   Especially in Linux, it is one of the most strange OS as
   UNIX, some special codes for Linux are prepared. Since
   these codes will never be judged automatically, you must
   never do "make config" in Linux.
   When you've done "make config" accidentally, do "make
   realclean" before the next step.

2. You can change some constants defined in fd.h, if you
   want. The meaning of each constant is described in the
   manual as the ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES.
   These constants and the environment variables have the
   same name. If you cannot decide, there is no problem as
   it is.

   Moreover, it is better to change PAGER and EDITOR to the
   suitable commands according to environment. But, if you
   can not prepare any applicable command, you should comment
   out that line.
   (PAGER: file viewer, EDITOR: text editor)

3. do "make".
   'cc' is used as a compiler by default. If you wish to use
   another compiler, you can specify it as "make CC=gcc". In
   this example, 'gcc' is used as a compiler.
   In case of cross-compiling, "make CC=lcc80 HOSTCC=cc" can
   specify both the cross-compiler and the compiler which
   is used for local executable files generated in build
   process. In this example, 'lcc80' is used as a compiler
   and 'cc' is used as a local compiler.
   In this case, the identifiers of 'CFLAGS'/'HOSTCFLAGS',
   'CPPFLAGS'/'HOSTCPPFLAGS' and 'LDFLAGS'/'HOSTLDFLAGS' can
   be also specified, to specify compiling options individually
   for cross-compiling and local compiling.
   It is supposed that files are installed under '/usr/local'
   by default. You can specify the installation path as
   "make PREFIX=/usr". In this example, it is supposed that
   files are installed under '/usr'.
   You can also specify the system configuration path as
   "make CONFDIR=/usr/local/etc".

4. Confirm whether the compiled one will run with no problem.

5. You can rewrite the macros (TOPDIR etc.) in Makefile.in
   according to your environment.
   If you rewrite DEFRC at this point, you must do "make
   clean" and do "make" again. In this case, while each
   description in documentation is different from the fact,
   there is no problem in executing this program.
   You can rewrite also DICTSRC, to change the Kana-Kanji
   translation dictionary from the standard Tan-Kanji
   dictionary to the other one. You should refer the #11 in
   TECHKNOW.eng for details.

6. You can copy _fdrc as the name of fdrc, and rewrite fdrc
   according to your environment. Or, you can create it from
   scratch.
   The prepared _fdrc is just an example. The configurations
   in it becomes the configurations common to your whole
   system. Then you should consider with the policy as an
   administrator.
   If you don't create fdrc, the configuration file common
   to whole system is not installed. In this case, only a
   configuration file of each user is valid.

7. do "make install".

8. If the manual is installed correctly (you can do "man fd"),
   all step is over.

   Sometimes the manual is not installed correctly, for the
   reason that nroff is not support Japanese, or so. For
   example, the meaningless characters is output, or the
   man command outputs any error message.
   In this case, if you install the plain text manual, you
   can refer the manual correctly.

   You can try the following targets for make in this rotation,
   and confirm to be able to do "man fd".
	jcatman -> jcatman-b -> jcompman -> jcompman-b
   If you do "make jcatman" and can not install correctly,
   then you do "make jcatman-b" ... you will continue.

   The target with -b will install for the terminal which
   cannot interpret the backspace (^H). The target with comp
   will install the textfile after compress it.

   If your OS doesn't support locale, the Japanese manual
   sometimes overwrite the English manual. In this case, you
   can install the only English one with the following targets.
	catman -> catman-b -> compman -> compman-b
   Each target can install the manual as well as the above
   targets, except that the Japanese manual is not installed.

9. Finish.


--------
- In Case of MS-DOS

1. The following compilers are confirmed.
	djgpp 1.1x			(g)
	djgpp 2.0x			(d)
	LSI C-86 Ver. 3.5		(l)
	Borland C++ 5.xx		(b)

   It is prepared makefile.?pc for DOS/V, makefile.?98 for
   PC-9800 series, then use it. `?' means the above letter in
   "()" according to each compiler.
   You can rename each file to makefile, or you can explicitly
   do "make -f makefile.xxx" when you do make.

   (You cannot compile with LSI C-86 trial version.)

2. You can change some constants defined in fd.h, if you
   want. The meaning of each constant is described in the
   manual as the ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES.
   These constants and the environment variables have the
   same name. If you cannot decide, there is no problem as
   it is.

   Moreover, it is better to change PAGER and EDITOR to the
   suitable commands according to environment. But, if you
   can not prepare any applicable command, you should comment
   out that line.
   (PAGER: file viewer, EDITOR: text editor)

3. do "make".

4. If it will become any error in compile by the shortage
   of memories or so, you can reduce some functions partially.
   You can define the identifier to reduce function in
   config.hin, referring the #8 in TECHKNOW.eng, and
   re-compile.
	Ex: #define _NOTREE	(cannot use tree screen)

5. You can convert the Kanji code with "make fd.doc" for the
   Japanese manual. Similarly, you can also create README.doc,
   HISTORY.doc, FAQ.doc and LICENSES.doc for the Japanese
   documents.
   (If you cannot read Japanese, these files are needless.)

6. You will copy the file of fd.exe and fd-unicd.tbl to the
   same directory where PATH passed. If you don't need the
   function to access LFN on the old MS-DOS, fd-unicd.tbl is
   not required.

7. You can copy _fdrc as the name of fd2rc to the directory
   where you copy fd.exe, and rewrite fd2rc according to your
   environment. Or, you can create it from scratch. The
   prepared _fdrc is just an example. Especially, it contains
   also the configurations nonexistent in MS-DOS version,
   you should consider and build it.
   If you want to prepare the configuration file for every
   user, you can set the environment variable HOME as the
   home directory of each user, and build fd2.rc in that
   directory.
   And, also fd.hst as the history file will be created on
   $HOME.

8. Finish.