File: strfile.man

package info (click to toggle)
fortune-mod 1:1.99.1-7
  • links: PTS, VCS
  • area: main
  • in suites: buster, jessie, jessie-kfreebsd, stretch
  • size: 12,808 kB
  • ctags: 640
  • sloc: ansic: 1,957; makefile: 240; python: 35; sh: 15
file content (199 lines) | stat: -rw-r--r-- 7,512 bytes parent folder | download | duplicates (5)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
.\"     $NetBSD: strfile.8,v 1.3 1995/03/23 08:28:45 cgd Exp $
.\"
.\" Copyright (c) 1989, 1991, 1993
.\"     The Regents of the University of California.  All rights reserved.
.\"
.\" 
.\" This code is derived from software contributed to Berkeley by
.\" Ken Arnold.
.\"
.\" Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
.\" modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
.\" are met:
.\" 1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
.\"    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
.\" 2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
.\"    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
.\"    documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
.\" 3. All advertising materials mentioning features or use of this software
.\"    must display the following acknowledgement:
.\"     This product includes software developed by the University of
.\"     California, Berkeley and its contributors.
.\" 4. Neither the name of the University nor the names of its contributors
.\"    may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software
.\"    without specific prior written permission.
.\"
.\" THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE REGENTS AND CONTRIBUTORS ``AS IS'' AND
.\" ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE
.\" IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE
.\" ARE DISCLAIMED.  IN NO EVENT SHALL THE REGENTS OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE
.\" FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL
.\" DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS
.\" OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION)
.\" HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT
.\" LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY
.\" OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF
.\" SUCH DAMAGE.
.\"
.\"     @(#)strfile.8   8.1 (Berkeley) 6/9/93
.\"
.\" This man page has been heavily modified, like the files it refers
.\" to, by Amy Lewis.  Changes to command line, and a different style of
.\" macros for Linux systems.
.\"
.TH STRFILE 1 "June 9, 1993 [Apr. '97]" "4th Berkeley Distribution" "UNIX System Manager's Manual"
.SH NAME
strfile \- create a random access file for storing strings
.br
unstr \- dump strings in pointer order
.SH SYNOPSIS
.BR strfile " [" \-iorsx "] [" \-c
.IR char "] " sourcefile " [" outputfile ]
.br
.BR unstr " [" \-c
.IR char "] " datafile [ .ext ]
.RI [ outputfile ]
.SH DESCRIPTION
.B strfile
reads a file containing groups of lines separated by a line containing
a single percent `%' sign (or other specified delimiter character) and
creates a data file which contains a header structure and a table of
file offsets for each group of lines. This allows random access of the
strings.
.PP
The output file, if not specified on the command line, is named 
.IR sourcefile.dat .
.PP
The purpose of 
.B unstr 
is to undo the work of
.BR strfile .
It prints out the strings contained in the sourcefile, which is
.I datafile.ext
without its extension, or
.I datafile
if no extension is specified (in this case, the extension 
.I .dat
is added to the name of the datafile) in the order
that they are listed in the header file
.IR datafile .
If no
.I outputfile 
is specified, it prints to standard output; otherwise it prints
to the file specified.
.B unstr
can also universally change the delimiter character in a strings file.
It is possible to create sorted versions of input files by using
.B strfile \-o 
and then using 
.B unstr 
to dump them out in the table order.
.SS Options
The options are as follows:
.TP
.BI "\-c " char
Change the delimiting character from the percent sign to 
.IR char .
This option is available for both
.BR strfile " and " unstr .
.TP
.B \-i
Ignore case when ordering the strings.
.TP
.B \-o
Order the strings in alphabetical order.  The offset table will be
sorted in the alphabetical order of the groups of lines referenced.
Any initial non-alphanumeric characters are ignored. This option
causes the STR_ORDERED bit in the header 
.I str_flags 
field to be set. (It also now really does sort! It didn't used to).
.TP
.B \-r
Randomize access to the strings.  Entries in the offset table will be
randomly ordered.  This option causes the STR_RANDOM bit in the header 
.I str_flags 
field to be set. (And really does randomize)
.TP
.B \-s
Run silently; don't give a summary message when finished.
.TP
.B \-x
Note that each alphabetic character in the groups of lines is rotated
13 positions in a simple caesar cypher.  This option causes the
STR_ROTATED bit in the header 
.I str_flags 
field to be set. Note that it 
.B does not
rotate the strings--that operation must be performed separately.
.SS Header
The format of the header is:
.PP
#define VERSION 1
.br
unsigned long str_version;  /* version number */
.br
unsigned long str_numstr;   /* # of strings in the file */
.br
unsigned long str_longlen;  /* length of longest string */
.br
unsigned long str_shortlen; /* shortest string length */
.br
#define STR_RANDOM    0x1   /* randomized pointers */
.br
#define STR_ORDERED   0x2   /* ordered pointers */
.br
#define STR_ROTATED   0x4   /* rot-13'd text */
.br
unsigned long str_flags;    /* bit field for flags */
.br
char str_delim;             /* delimiting character */
.PP
All fields are written in network byte order.
.SH BUGS
Fewer now, one hopes.  However, fortunes (text strings) beginning with a
blank line appear to be sorted between random letters.  This includes
ASCII art that contains no letters, and first lines that are solely
non-alphanumeric, apparently.  I've no idea why this should be.
.SH OTHER USES
What can you do with this besides printing sarcastic and obscene messages
to the screens of lusers at login or logout?
.PP
There
.B are
some other possibilities.  Source code for a sample program,
.BR randstr ,
is included with this distribution: randstr splits the difference between
.BR unstr " and " fortune .
It reads a single, specified file, and randomly selects a single text
string.
.IP 1
Include
.I strfile.h
into a news reading/posting program, to generate random signatures.
.BR Tin (1)
does something similar, in a much more complex manner.
.IP 2
Include it in a game.  While strfile doesn't support 'fields' or
\&'records', there's no reason that the text strings can't be consistent:
first line, a die roll; second line, a score; third and subsequent lines,
a text message.
.IP 3
Use it to store your address book.  Hell, some of the guys I know
would be as well off using it to decide who to call on Friday nights (and
for some, it wouldn't matter whether there were phone numbers in it or not).
.IP 4
Use it in 'lottery' situations.  If you're an ISP, write a script to
store login names and GECOS from
.I /etc/passwd
in strfile format, write another to send 'congratulations, you've won'
to the lucky login selected.  The prize might be a month's free service,
or if you're AOL, a month free on a real service provider.
.SH SEE ALSO
.BR byteorder "(3), " fortune (6)
.SH HISTORY
The
.B strfile
utility first appeared in 4.4BSD. This version was heavily modified,
much of it in ways peculiar to Linux.  Work has since been done to make
the code more generic, and has so far been tested to work with SunOS
4.x.  More platforms are expected to be supported as work continues.