File: radiusd.conf.in

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# -*- text -*-
##
## radiusd.conf	-- FreeRADIUS server configuration file - @RADIUSD_VERSION_STRING@
##
##	http://www.freeradius.org/
##	$Id: 59e59f3ac443e75663333a5b7732664b67c5567d $
##

######################################################################
#
#	Read "man radiusd" before editing this file.  See the section
#	titled DEBUGGING.  It outlines a method where you can quickly
#	obtain the configuration you want, without running into
#	trouble.
#
#	Run the server in debugging mode, and READ the output.
#
#		$ radiusd -X
#
#	We cannot emphasize this point strongly enough.  The vast
#	majority of problems can be solved by carefully reading the
#	debugging output, which includes warnings about common issues,
#	and suggestions for how they may be fixed.
#
#	There may be a lot of output, but look carefully for words like:
#	"warning", "error", "reject", or "failure".  The messages there
#	will usually be enough to guide you to a solution.
#
#	If you are going to ask a question on the mailing list, then
#	explain what you are trying to do, and include the output from
#	debugging mode (radiusd -X).  Failure to do so means that all
#	of the responses to your question will be people telling you
#	to "post the output of radiusd -X".

######################################################################
#
#  	The location of other config files and logfiles are declared
#  	in this file.
#
#  	Also general configuration for modules can be done in this
#  	file, it is exported through the API to modules that ask for
#  	it.
#
#	See "man radiusd.conf" for documentation on the format of this
#	file.  Note that the individual configuration items are NOT
#	documented in that "man" page.  They are only documented here,
#	in the comments.
#
#	The "unlang" policy language can be used to create complex
#	if / else policies.  See "man unlang" for details.
#

prefix = @prefix@
exec_prefix = @exec_prefix@
sysconfdir = @sysconfdir@
localstatedir = @localstatedir@
sbindir = @sbindir@
logdir = @logdir@
raddbdir = @raddbdir@
radacctdir = @radacctdir@

#
#  name of the running server.  See also the "-n" command-line option.
name = freeradius

#  Location of config and logfiles.
confdir = ${raddbdir}
modconfdir = ${confdir}/mods-config
certdir = ${confdir}/certs
cadir   = ${confdir}/certs
run_dir = ${localstatedir}/run/${name}

# Should likely be ${localstatedir}/lib/radiusd
db_dir = ${raddbdir}

#
# libdir: Where to find the rlm_* modules.
#
#   This should be automatically set at configuration time.
#
#   If the server builds and installs, but fails at execution time
#   with an 'undefined symbol' error, then you can use the libdir
#   directive to work around the problem.
#
#   The cause is usually that a library has been installed on your
#   system in a place where the dynamic linker CANNOT find it.  When
#   executing as root (or another user), your personal environment MAY
#   be set up to allow the dynamic linker to find the library.  When
#   executing as a daemon, FreeRADIUS MAY NOT have the same
#   personalized configuration.
#
#   To work around the problem, find out which library contains that symbol,
#   and add the directory containing that library to the end of 'libdir',
#   with a colon separating the directory names.  NO spaces are allowed.
#
#   e.g. libdir = /usr/local/lib:/opt/package/lib
#
#   You can also try setting the LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable
#   in a script which starts the server.
#
#   If that does not work, then you can re-configure and re-build the
#   server to NOT use shared libraries, via:
#
#	./configure --disable-shared
#	make
#	make install
#
libdir = @libdir@

#  pidfile: Where to place the PID of the RADIUS server.
#
#  The server may be signalled while it's running by using this
#  file.
#
#  This file is written when ONLY running in daemon mode.
#
#  e.g.:  kill -HUP `cat /var/run/radiusd/radiusd.pid`
#
pidfile = ${run_dir}/${name}.pid

#
#  correct_escapes: use correct backslash escaping
#
#  Prior to version 3.0.5, the handling of backslashes was a little
#  awkward, i.e. "wrong".  In some cases, to get one backslash into
#  a regex, you had to put 4 in the config files.
#
#  Version 3.0.5 fixes that.  However, for backwards compatibility,
#  the new method of escaping is DISABLED BY DEFAULT.  This means
#  that upgrading to 3.0.5 won't break your configuration.
#
#  If you don't have double backslashes (i.e. \\) in your configuration,
#  this won't matter to you.  If you do have them, fix that to use only
#  one backslash, and then set "correct_escapes = true".
#
#  You can check for this by doing:
#
#	$ grep '\\\\' $(find raddb -type f -print)
#
correct_escapes = true

#  panic_action: Command to execute if the server dies unexpectedly.
#
#  FOR PRODUCTION SYSTEMS, ACTIONS SHOULD ALWAYS EXIT.
#  AN INTERACTIVE ACTION MEANS THE SERVER IS NOT RESPONDING TO REQUESTS.
#  AN INTERACTICE ACTION MEANS THE SERVER WILL NOT RESTART.
#
#  THE SERVER MUST NOT BE ALLOWED EXECUTE UNTRUSTED PANIC ACTION CODE
#  PATTACH CAN BE USED AS AN ATTACK VECTOR.
#
#  The panic action is a command which will be executed if the server
#  receives a fatal, non user generated signal, i.e. SIGSEGV, SIGBUS,
#  SIGABRT or SIGFPE.
#
#  This can be used to start an interactive debugging session so
#  that information regarding the current state of the server can
#  be acquired.
#
#  The following string substitutions are available:
#  - %e   The currently executing program e.g. /sbin/radiusd
#  - %p   The PID of the currently executing program e.g. 12345
#
#  Standard ${} substitutions are also allowed.
#
#  An example panic action for opening an interactive session in GDB would be:
#
#panic_action = "gdb %e %p"
#
#  Again, don't use that on a production system.
#
#  An example panic action for opening an automated session in GDB would be:
#
#panic_action = "gdb -silent -x ${raddbdir}/panic.gdb %e %p 2>&1 | tee ${logdir}/gdb-${name}-%p.log"
#
#  That command can be used on a production system.
#

#  max_request_time: The maximum time (in seconds) to handle a request.
#
#  Requests which take more time than this to process may be killed, and
#  a REJECT message is returned.
#
#  WARNING: If you notice that requests take a long time to be handled,
#  then this MAY INDICATE a bug in the server, in one of the modules
#  used to handle a request, OR in your local configuration.
#
#  This problem is most often seen when using an SQL database.  If it takes
#  more than a second or two to receive an answer from the SQL database,
#  then it probably means that you haven't indexed the database.  See your
#  SQL server documentation for more information.
#
#  Useful range of values: 5 to 120
#
max_request_time = 30

#  cleanup_delay: The time to wait (in seconds) before cleaning up
#  a reply which was sent to the NAS.
#
#  The RADIUS request is normally cached internally for a short period
#  of time, after the reply is sent to the NAS.  The reply packet may be
#  lost in the network, and the NAS will not see it.  The NAS will then
#  re-send the request, and the server will respond quickly with the
#  cached reply.
#
#  If this value is set too low, then duplicate requests from the NAS
#  MAY NOT be detected, and will instead be handled as separate requests.
#
#  If this value is set too high, then the server will cache too many
#  requests, and some new requests may get blocked.  (See 'max_requests'.)
#
#  Useful range of values: 2 to 10
#
cleanup_delay = 5

#  max_requests: The maximum number of requests which the server keeps
#  track of.  This should be 256 multiplied by the number of clients.
#  e.g. With 4 clients, this number should be 1024.
#
#  If this number is too low, then when the server becomes busy,
#  it will not respond to any new requests, until the 'cleanup_delay'
#  time has passed, and it has removed the old requests.
#
#  If this number is set too high, then the server will use a bit more
#  memory for no real benefit.
#
#  If you aren't sure what it should be set to, it's better to set it
#  too high than too low.  Setting it to 1000 per client is probably
#  the highest it should be.
#
#  Useful range of values: 256 to infinity
#
max_requests = 16384

#  hostname_lookups: Log the names of clients or just their IP addresses
#  e.g., www.freeradius.org (on) or 206.47.27.232 (off).
#
#  The default is 'off' because it would be overall better for the net
#  if people had to knowingly turn this feature on, since enabling it
#  means that each client request will result in AT LEAST one lookup
#  request to the nameserver.   Enabling hostname_lookups will also
#  mean that your server may stop randomly for 30 seconds from time
#  to time, if the DNS requests take too long.
#
#  Turning hostname lookups off also means that the server won't block
#  for 30 seconds, if it sees an IP address which has no name associated
#  with it.
#
#  allowed values: {no, yes}
#
hostname_lookups = no

#
#  Logging section.  The various "log_*" configuration items
#  will eventually be moved here.
#
log {
	#
	#  Destination for log messages.  This can be one of:
	#
	#	files - log to "file", as defined below.
	#	syslog - to syslog (see also the "syslog_facility", below.
	#	stdout - standard output
	#	stderr - standard error.
	#
	#  The command-line option "-X" over-rides this option, and forces
	#  logging to go to stdout.
	#
	destination = files

	#
	#  Highlight important messages sent to stderr and stdout.
	#
	#  Option will be ignored (disabled) if output if TERM is not
	#  an xterm or output is not to a TTY.
	#
	colourise = yes

	#
	#  The logging messages for the server are appended to the
	#  tail of this file if destination == "files"
	#
	#  If the server is running in debugging mode, this file is
	#  NOT used.
	#
	file = ${logdir}/radius.log

	#
	#  Which syslog facility to use, if ${destination} == "syslog"
	#
	#  The exact values permitted here are OS-dependent.  You probably
	#  don't want to change this.
	#
	syslog_facility = daemon

	#  Log the full User-Name attribute, as it was found in the request.
	#
	# allowed values: {no, yes}
	#
	stripped_names = no

	#  Log authentication requests to the log file.
	#
	#  allowed values: {no, yes}
	#
	auth = no

	#  Log passwords with the authentication requests.
	#  auth_badpass  - logs password if it's rejected
	#  auth_goodpass - logs password if it's correct
	#
	#  allowed values: {no, yes}
	#
	auth_badpass = no
	auth_goodpass = no

	#  Log additional text at the end of the "Login OK" messages.
	#  for these to work, the "auth" and "auth_goodpass" or "auth_badpass"
	#  configurations above have to be set to "yes".
	#
	#  The strings below are dynamically expanded, which means that
	#  you can put anything you want in them.  However, note that
	#  this expansion can be slow, and can negatively impact server
	#  performance.
	#
#	msg_goodpass = ""
#	msg_badpass = ""

	#  The message when the user exceeds the Simultaneous-Use limit.
	#
	msg_denied = "You are already logged in - access denied"
}

#  The program to execute to do concurrency checks.
checkrad = ${sbindir}/checkrad

# SECURITY CONFIGURATION
#
#  There may be multiple methods of attacking on the server.  This
#  section holds the configuration items which minimize the impact
#  of those attacks
#
security {
	#  chroot: directory where the server does "chroot".
	#
	#  The chroot is done very early in the process of starting
	#  the server.  After the chroot has been performed it
	#  switches to the "user" listed below (which MUST be
	#  specified).  If "group" is specified, it switches to that
	#  group, too.  Any other groups listed for the specified
	#  "user" in "/etc/group" are also added as part of this
	#  process.
	#
	#  The current working directory (chdir / cd) is left
	#  *outside* of the chroot until all of the modules have been
	#  initialized.  This allows the "raddb" directory to be left
	#  outside of the chroot.  Once the modules have been
	#  initialized, it does a "chdir" to ${logdir}.  This means
	#  that it should be impossible to break out of the chroot.
	#
	#  If you are worried about security issues related to this
	#  use of chdir, then simply ensure that the "raddb" directory
	#  is inside of the chroot, end be sure to do "cd raddb"
	#  BEFORE starting the server.
	#
	#  If the server is statically linked, then the only files
	#  that have to exist in the chroot are ${run_dir} and
	#  ${logdir}.  If you do the "cd raddb" as discussed above,
	#  then the "raddb" directory has to be inside of the chroot
	#  directory, too.
	#
#	chroot = /path/to/chroot/directory

	# user/group: The name (or #number) of the user/group to run radiusd as.
	#
	#   If these are commented out, the server will run as the
	#   user/group that started it.  In order to change to a
	#   different user/group, you MUST be root ( or have root
	#   privileges ) to start the server.
	#
	#   We STRONGLY recommend that you run the server with as few
	#   permissions as possible.  That is, if you're not using
	#   shadow passwords, the user and group items below should be
	#   set to radius'.
	#
	#  NOTE that some kernels refuse to setgid(group) when the
	#  value of (unsigned)group is above 60000; don't use group
	#  "nobody" on these systems!
	#
	#  On systems with shadow passwords, you might have to set
	#  'group = shadow' for the server to be able to read the
	#  shadow password file.  If you can authenticate users while
	#  in debug mode, but not in daemon mode, it may be that the
	#  debugging mode server is running as a user that can read
	#  the shadow info, and the user listed below can not.
	#
	#  The server will also try to use "initgroups" to read
	#  /etc/groups.  It will join all groups where "user" is a
	#  member.  This can allow for some finer-grained access
	#  controls.
	#
	user = freerad
	group = freerad

	#  Core dumps are a bad thing.  This should only be set to
	#  'yes' if you're debugging a problem with the server.
	#
	#  allowed values: {no, yes}
	#
	allow_core_dumps = no

	#
	#  max_attributes: The maximum number of attributes
	#  permitted in a RADIUS packet.  Packets which have MORE
	#  than this number of attributes in them will be dropped.
	#
	#  If this number is set too low, then no RADIUS packets
	#  will be accepted.
	#
	#  If this number is set too high, then an attacker may be
	#  able to send a small number of packets which will cause
	#  the server to use all available memory on the machine.
	#
	#  Setting this number to 0 means "allow any number of attributes"
	max_attributes = 200

	#
	#  reject_delay: When sending an Access-Reject, it can be
	#  delayed for a few seconds.  This may help slow down a DoS
	#  attack.  It also helps to slow down people trying to brute-force
	#  crack a users password.
	#
	#  Setting this number to 0 means "send rejects immediately"
	#
	#  If this number is set higher than 'cleanup_delay', then the
	#  rejects will be sent at 'cleanup_delay' time, when the request
	#  is deleted from the internal cache of requests.
	#
	#  As of Version 3.0.5, "reject_delay" has sub-second resolution.
	#  e.g. "reject_delay =  1.4" seconds is possible.
	#
	#  Useful ranges: 1 to 5
	reject_delay = 1

	#
	#  status_server: Whether or not the server will respond
	#  to Status-Server requests.
	#
	#  When sent a Status-Server message, the server responds with
	#  an Access-Accept or Accounting-Response packet.
	#
	#  This is mainly useful for administrators who want to "ping"
	#  the server, without adding test users, or creating fake
	#  accounting packets.
	#
	#  It's also useful when a NAS marks a RADIUS server "dead".
	#  The NAS can periodically "ping" the server with a Status-Server
	#  packet.  If the server responds, it must be alive, and the
	#  NAS can start using it for real requests.
	#
	#  See also raddb/sites-available/status
	#
	status_server = yes

@openssl_version_check_config@
}

# PROXY CONFIGURATION
#
#  proxy_requests: Turns proxying of RADIUS requests on or off.
#
#  The server has proxying turned on by default.  If your system is NOT
#  set up to proxy requests to another server, then you can turn proxying
#  off here.  This will save a small amount of resources on the server.
#
#  If you have proxying turned off, and your configuration files say
#  to proxy a request, then an error message will be logged.
#
#  To disable proxying, change the "yes" to "no", and comment the
#  $INCLUDE line.
#
#  allowed values: {no, yes}
#
proxy_requests  = yes
$INCLUDE proxy.conf


# CLIENTS CONFIGURATION
#
#  Client configuration is defined in "clients.conf".
#

#  The 'clients.conf' file contains all of the information from the old
#  'clients' and 'naslist' configuration files.  We recommend that you
#  do NOT use 'client's or 'naslist', although they are still
#  supported.
#
#  Anything listed in 'clients.conf' will take precedence over the
#  information from the old-style configuration files.
#
$INCLUDE clients.conf


# THREAD POOL CONFIGURATION
#
#  The thread pool is a long-lived group of threads which
#  take turns (round-robin) handling any incoming requests.
#
#  You probably want to have a few spare threads around,
#  so that high-load situations can be handled immediately.  If you
#  don't have any spare threads, then the request handling will
#  be delayed while a new thread is created, and added to the pool.
#
#  You probably don't want too many spare threads around,
#  otherwise they'll be sitting there taking up resources, and
#  not doing anything productive.
#
#  The numbers given below should be adequate for most situations.
#
thread pool {
	#  Number of servers to start initially --- should be a reasonable
	#  ballpark figure.
	start_servers = 5

	#  Limit on the total number of servers running.
	#
	#  If this limit is ever reached, clients will be LOCKED OUT, so it
	#  should NOT BE SET TOO LOW.  It is intended mainly as a brake to
	#  keep a runaway server from taking the system with it as it spirals
	#  down...
	#
	#  You may find that the server is regularly reaching the
	#  'max_servers' number of threads, and that increasing
	#  'max_servers' doesn't seem to make much difference.
	#
	#  If this is the case, then the problem is MOST LIKELY that
	#  your back-end databases are taking too long to respond, and
	#  are preventing the server from responding in a timely manner.
	#
	#  The solution is NOT do keep increasing the 'max_servers'
	#  value, but instead to fix the underlying cause of the
	#  problem: slow database, or 'hostname_lookups=yes'.
	#
	#  For more information, see 'max_request_time', above.
	#
	max_servers = 32

	#  Server-pool size regulation.  Rather than making you guess
	#  how many servers you need, FreeRADIUS dynamically adapts to
	#  the load it sees, that is, it tries to maintain enough
	#  servers to handle the current load, plus a few spare
	#  servers to handle transient load spikes.
	#
	#  It does this by periodically checking how many servers are
	#  waiting for a request.  If there are fewer than
	#  min_spare_servers, it creates a new spare.  If there are
	#  more than max_spare_servers, some of the spares die off.
	#  The default values are probably OK for most sites.
	#
	min_spare_servers = 3
	max_spare_servers = 10

	#  When the server receives a packet, it places it onto an
	#  internal queue, where the worker threads (configured above)
	#  pick it up for processing.  The maximum size of that queue
	#  is given here.
	#
	#  When the queue is full, any new packets will be silently
	#  discarded.
	#
	#  The most common cause of the queue being full is that the
	#  server is dependent on a slow database, and it has received
	#  a large "spike" of traffic.  When that happens, there is
	#  very little you can do other than make sure the server
	#  receives less traffic, or make sure that the database can
	#  handle the load.
	#
#	max_queue_size = 65536

	#  Clean up old threads periodically.  For no reason other than
	#  it might be useful.
	#
	#  '0' is a special value meaning 'infinity', or 'the servers never
	#  exit'
	max_requests_per_server = 0

	#  Automatically limit the number of accounting requests.
	#  This configuration item tracks how many requests per second
	#  the server can handle.  It does this by tracking the
	#  packets/s received by the server for processing, and
	#  comparing that to the packets/s handled by the child
	#  threads.
	#

	#  If the received PPS is larger than the processed PPS, *and*
	#  the queue is more than half full, then new accounting
	#  requests are probabilistically discarded.  This lowers the
	#  number of packets that the server needs to process.  Over
	#  time, the server will "catch up" with the traffic.
	#
	#  Throwing away accounting packets is usually safe and low
	#  impact.  The NAS will retransmit them in a few seconds, or
	#  even a few minutes.  Vendors should read RFC 5080 Section 2.2.1
	#  to see how accounting packets should be retransmitted.  Using
	#  any other method is likely to cause network meltdowns.
	#
	auto_limit_acct = no
}

######################################################################
#
#  SNMP notifications.  Uncomment the following line to enable
#  snmptraps.  Note that you MUST also configure the full path
#  to the "snmptrap" command in the "trigger.conf" file.
#
#$INCLUDE trigger.conf

# MODULE CONFIGURATION
#
#  The names and configuration of each module is located in this section.
#
#  After the modules are defined here, they may be referred to by name,
#  in other sections of this configuration file.
#
modules {
	#
	#  Each module has a configuration as follows:
	#
	#	name [ instance ] {
	#		config_item = value
	#		...
	#	}
	#
	#  The 'name' is used to load the 'rlm_name' library
	#  which implements the functionality of the module.
	#
	#  The 'instance' is optional.  To have two different instances
	#  of a module, it first must be referred to by 'name'.
	#  The different copies of the module are then created by
	#  inventing two 'instance' names, e.g. 'instance1' and 'instance2'
	#
	#  The instance names can then be used in later configuration
	#  INSTEAD of the original 'name'.  See the 'radutmp' configuration
	#  for an example.
	#

	#
	#  As of 3.0, modules are in mods-enabled/.  Files matching
	#  the regex /[a-zA-Z0-9_.]+/ are loaded.  The modules are
	#  initialized ONLY if they are referenced in a processing
	#  section, such as authorize, authenticate, accounting,
	#  pre/post-proxy, etc.
	#
	$INCLUDE mods-enabled/
}

# Instantiation
#
#  This section orders the loading of the modules.  Modules
#  listed here will get loaded BEFORE the later sections like
#  authorize, authenticate, etc. get examined.
#
#  This section is not strictly needed.  When a section like
#  authorize refers to a module, it's automatically loaded and
#  initialized.  However, some modules may not be listed in any
#  of the following sections, so they can be listed here.
#
#  Also, listing modules here ensures that you have control over
#  the order in which they are initialized.  If one module needs
#  something defined by another module, you can list them in order
#  here, and ensure that the configuration will be OK.
#
#  After the modules listed here have been loaded, all of the modules
#  in the "mods-enabled" directory will be loaded.  Loading the
#  "mods-enabled" directory means that unlike Version 2, you usually
#  don't need to list modules here.
#
instantiate {
	#
	# We list the counter module here so that it registers
	# the check_name attribute before any module which sets
	# it
#	daily

	# subsections here can be thought of as "virtual" modules.
	#
	# e.g. If you have two redundant SQL servers, and you want to
	# use them in the authorize and accounting sections, you could
	# place a "redundant" block in each section, containing the
	# exact same text.  Or, you could uncomment the following
	# lines, and list "redundant_sql" in the authorize and
	# accounting sections.
	#
	#  The "virtual" module defined here can also be used with
	#  dynamic expansions, under a few conditions:
	#
	#  * The section is "redundant", or "load-balance", or
	#    "redundant-load-balance"
	#  * The section contains modules ONLY, and no sub-sections
	#  * all modules in the section are using the same rlm_
	#    driver, e.g. They are all sql, or all ldap, etc.
	#
	#  When those conditions are satisfied, the server will
	#  automatically register a dynamic expansion, using the
	#  name of the "virtual" module.  In the example below,
	#  it will be "redundant_sql".  You can then use this expansion
	#  just like any other:
	#
	#	update reply {
	#		Filter-Id := "%{redundant_sql: ... }"
	#	}
	#
	#  In this example, the expansion is done via module "sql1",
	#  and if that expansion fails, using module "sql2".
	#
	#  For best results, configure the "pool" subsection of the
	#  module so that "retry_delay" is non-zero.  That will allow
	#  the redundant block to quickly ignore all "down" SQL
	#  databases.  If instead we have "retry_delay = 0", then
	#  every time the redundant block is used, the server will try
	#  to open a connection to every "down" database, causing
	#  problems.
	#
	#redundant redundant_sql {
	#	sql1
	#	sql2
	#}
}

######################################################################
#
#  Policies are virtual modules, similar to those defined in the
#  "instantiate" section above.
#
#  Defining a policy in one of the policy.d files means that it can be
#  referenced in multiple places as a *name*, rather than as a series of
#  conditions to match, and actions to take.
#
#  Policies are something like subroutines in a normal language, but
#  they cannot be called recursively. They MUST be defined in order.
#  If policy A calls policy B, then B MUST be defined before A.
#
######################################################################
policy {
	$INCLUDE policy.d/
}

######################################################################
#
#	Load virtual servers.
#
#	This next $INCLUDE line loads files in the directory that
#	match the regular expression: /[a-zA-Z0-9_.]+/
#
#	It allows you to define new virtual servers simply by placing
#	a file into the raddb/sites-enabled/ directory.
#
$INCLUDE sites-enabled/

######################################################################
#
#	All of the other configuration sections like "authorize {}",
#	"authenticate {}", "accounting {}", have been moved to the
#	the file:
#
#		raddb/sites-available/default
#
#	This is the "default" virtual server that has the same
#	configuration as in version 1.0.x and 1.1.x.  The default
#	installation enables this virtual server.  You should
#	edit it to create policies for your local site.
#
#	For more documentation on virtual servers, see:
#
#		raddb/sites-available/README
#
######################################################################