File: INSTALL

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Compilation:
	The first step in running this fine software (:) is to get it to
	compile.  Every effort on my part will be made to make this code
	compile and run on any reasonable system.  The information in this
	file CURRENTLY pertains only to Unix users, as I don't have the
	VMS experience required to create this code on those systems.

	The first step is to run the configure script provided in this
	directory.  This will generate a good makefile and a file called
	tweak.h in the include directory.  These files are vital for the
	compilation of the system.

	You must also edit the files include/client_conf.h and
	include server_conf.h as they contain parameters which must
	still at this point be manually set by the person compiling
	the code.

>>	By default, the configure script will set up the Makefile
>>	to install the code in /usr/local/bin and the man pages under
>>	/usr/local/man.  If you wish to change this, you MUST run
>>	configure with the --prefix option.  For instance, on my
>>	machine, I install the files under /usr/jt/bin and /usr/jt/man.
>>	To do this, I type configure --prefix=/usr/jt

	At this point, you should just be able to type 'make' (or
	'make merge' in you are compiling the merged clients) and
	then 'make install' (or 'make install-merge').  This will 
	compile and (if you do an install) install the clients 
	in the directory specified by you in the Makefile.  You 
	may also wish to type 'make install-man' if you wish to
	install the manual pages.

	If you get ANY errors or warnings while compiling this code
	(excepting warnings about the function signal), please send
	me email (at A.J.Doherty@reading.ac.uk) with a complete copy of the
	output of make as well as a copy of the tweak.h file and the
	Makefile.  These will be required for me to even attempt to
	track down the bug, and if they aren't included, I most likely
	won't be able to.

	IMPORTANT NOTE: You do not need to run the fspd process if you only
	wish to access existing fsp archives.  FSPD is only needed if you 
	wish to set up and maintain a new archive for use.

Client utilities:
        All inter-command states are kept in these three shell environment
        variables.

            FSP_PORT            Port number of the fspd you wish to contact.
            FSP_HOST            Host name or number of the fspd.
            FSP_DIR             Your current working directory in the archive.

        When multiple client utilities are run at the same time on the
        same client machine, packet multiplexing mechanisms can be used
        to enable concurrent access to the same fsp database.  If none
        of the mechanisms are selected at compile time, FSP_LOCALPORT
        can be used to ensure that only once client utility can run at
        any time.  In this case, FSP_LOCALPORT can be set to any port
        number not current used on the client machine.

        FSP_TRACE can be set if you want status reports be printed while
        files are being transferred.

	FSP_DELAY variable can be used to set the retransmit interval for
	client utilities (in thousandth of a second).  The retransmit rate
	is adjusted in an exponential manner, until the retry rate reaches
	5 minutes per retry.  This delay cannot be set below 250 usecs.

        FSP_BUF_SIZE can be set to a positive number less than or equal
        to 1024.  When set, it determines the size of data to be send for
        each request during file and directory information transfer.  The
        default is 1024.  Some sites are connected via links that cannot
        transmit buffers containing 1024 bytes of data in addition to the
        header information.  Setting FSP_BUF_SIZE to a lower value will
        allow these sites to access fsp archives.

        FSP_LOCAL_DIR can be set to a local working directory from/to which
        all data will be transferred.

Server Administration:
	The only things you need for setting up a FSP server is a work
        directory for the service the FSP server itself (fspd) and
	an fspd.conf file in the place you specified in include/server_conf.h.

	To create an fspd.conf file, copy the example.conf file
	provided to the correct place and edit to suit your tastes.

        fspd can run independently or it can be run under inetd.  When
        running independently, fspd waits for messages through a UDP
        socket whoes port number is defined in the fspd.conf file. 
	When runing under inetd, fspd is invoked as in.fspd.  Inetd will
	spawn fspd when a message arrives for the FSP socket.  The fspd
	process will take over and stick around to wait on additional
	messages.  After 2 minutes pass with no messages, fspd will exit
	and return control to inted.

        Sample setup for inetd operation:

            In /etc/services file:

                fsp             21/udp          fspd

            In /etc/inetd.conf file:

                fsp dgram   udp wait ftp /usr/etc/fspd in.fspd

            In this sample, the same port number for ftp is used for the
            fsp socket.  There will not be a conflict because ftp uses
            stream protocol, and fsp uses UDP protocol.  The fspd program
            in this example is ran under user 'ftp'.

	Many other options controlling the behavior of fspd can be set in
	the fspd.conf file.  Please read the comments in the example.conf
	file for details.

	FSPD provides directory security through a series of . files created
	in the directories serviced by fspd.  These files are invisible to
	the clients, and can (mostly) be changed via the fprocmd client
	utility (or by the server administrator manually).  The only file
	that can not be changed in this manner is the ownership of a
	directory.  The files and their meanings are:

	.OWN.XXXXXXXX	specifies that the machine whose IP number is
			encoded as XXXXXXXX owns the directory.  The owner
			of a directory automatically has all other rights to
			a directory and is the only one that can change the
			other protections.  It is created when a directory
			is initially created in the archive via fmkdir.

	.FSP_OK_DEL	Grants any client the permission to delete any file
			from the current directory.

	.FSP_OK_ADD	Grants any client the permission to add new files to				the current directory.

	.FSP_OK_MKDIR	Grants any client the permission to create new sub-
			directories under the current directory owned by
			the client creating the directory.

	.FSP_PRIVATE	If this file exists, only the owner of the directory
			is allowed to read the contents of the files in the
			directory.  Subdirectories of this directory will
			inherit the privacy protection.

        Clients do not get to read the directory information directly.
        Instead, fspd maintains a directory listing for each directory
        in a cache file.  If the directory is writable by fspd, or if a
        writable file in it is prepared beforehand, fspd will store the
        directory information in .FSP_CONTENT file in that directory.
        Otherwise, it will store the information in a pair of files (with
        hashed names) in a special directory specified in the fspd.conf
	file.  The latter allows read-only directories to be exported.

        When a client requests information for a directory, the cache
        file is created if it doesn't exist, and it is rebuilt if it is
        out of date.  The information is accessed by having the client
        read the directory listing file. Care is taken so that the client
        will not get corrupted entries when the directory is changed while
        the listing is being read.

        Files being uploaded are first written to a temporary file in the
        work directory: .TXXXXXXXXYYYY where XXXXXXXX is the inet number
        of the client, and YYYY is the port number of the client program.
        When upload is compelete, the file is moved into the intended
        location.

        Sending it an 'alarm' signal will cause fspd to dump its current
        client database into the file .HTAB_DUMP in the work directory.
        This can be useful for debugging and for catching rogue clients.