File: READ_ME.FWEB

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fweb 1.62-6
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			  --- INSTALLING FWEB ---


IMPORTANT NOTES:

* FWEB attempts to use the GNU standards for configuration, makefiles, etc.
If you are a Unix user (more precisely, if you have sh available), please
follow the installation procedure described below under ``SUMMARY of
INSTALLATION PROCEDURE''.  If you are an IBM-PC user, executable files that
run in extended memory MAY be provided in

	ftp/pppl.gov:/pub/fweb/executables

(Their availability may lag behind the standard Unix release.)  Otherwise,
DO NOT USE THIS VERSION, as neither the code nor the installation
procedures have been tested for v1.50 or above on non-unix platforms.

* Documentation for this version is maintained in GNU texinfo format.  The
installation procedure will install the relevant files (`make install').
Online information will then be available through the info browser
(accessible through emacs, stand-alone, or by saying `ftangle -h').
Alternatively, you can obtain printed documentation by saying

	cd Manual
	lpr fweb.ps

if fweb.ps has been saved on your system.

SUMMARY of INSTALLATION PROCEDURE:

  (0) If you are a Unix user with an ANSI-C compiler (you will have a
minimum of hassle with gcc), install FWEB by using the `./configure', then
`make' procedure described below.  Brackets denote optional.  By default,

	prefix == /usr/local 
	exec-prefix == /usr/local

	CFLAGS == -O

(NOTE WELL that the FWEB source code is supposed to be ANSI-compatible.  It
compiles without warnings with `gcc -ansi -pedantic'.  Some compilers
default to old-style Kernighan & Ritchie; for them, you must override the
default by providing an explicit CFLAGS argument to make.  For example, on
the DEC alpha, you may need to say `make CFLAGS="-std1 -O"'.  Please report
ANY compiler warnings you obtain from an allegedly ANSI-compatible
compiler.)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
	cd fweb-1.61/Web
	./configure [--prefix=path] [--exec-prefix=path]
	make -n install 
# Use the -n option to see what's going to happen.  Ignore the fact that this
# may say it's going to run FTANGLE; that won't happen when you say `make'
# below.  If you need to make changes to system paths, etc.,
# either use the --prefix and/or --exec-prefix options, or edit
# defaults.mk.in, then rerun ./configure.)
	make [CFLAGS='special compiler flags']
	<Log on as root>
	make install
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This should be sufficient.  However, if you have difficulties, you may need
to absorb the following information.

  ./configure is an sh script that was generated automatically by running the
utility program `autoconf'.  In a departure from standard procedure, it first
reads an FWEB configuration file whose default name is `configure.ini'.
(More about that below.)  Then it attempts to figure out various local
system features automatically.  Finally, it generates three files from
autoconf templates with .in suffixes:

	defaults.mk.in  => defaults.mk
	config.h.in     => config.h
	custom.h.in     => custom.h

The file `defaults.mk' is included into Web/Makefile.  The files `config.h'
and `custom.h' are included into the C code by the *.c files.  Check
out what configure produces, especially for the directory prefixes in the
INSTALLATION section of `defaults.mk'.  If you need to make changes, make
them in the *.in files (save the old templates), then run ./configure again.

  For more information about automatic configuration, read the file
UNIX_INSTALL, which comes courtesy of the Free Software Foundation..  

  The present procedure differs in one respect from standard ./configure
protocol: an extra layer of variable definitions is used for variables
related to FWEB that are not figured out automatically by ./configure.
E.g., instead of saying in defaults.mk.in ``OBJ = obj'', one says ``OBJ =
@_OBJ_@''.  Configure replaces the @_OBJ_@ with the present value of the
environment variable _OBJ_.  To give that a value, ./configure sources in
the contents of the file $CONFIGURE_INI.  If the environment variable
CONFIGURE_INI isn't defined, then the default file `configure.ini' is read.
This mechanism is partly used to aid the developer--files like `ansi.ini' are
used to automatically generate the old-style bootstrap files for systems
that can't use ./configure---and partly to ease the transition to
./configure, which doesn't figure everything out for itself yet.

  Note that configure.ini unsets the values of certain variables like CC.
(It unsets CC in particular in order to help ensure that gcc is
automatically chosen as the compiler of choice.)

   (1) If you can't use ./configure, you can try using the (very-very!)
old-style bootstraps in the boot subdirectory.  However, these haven't yet
been upgraded or tested, with the exception of those for the IBM-PC.  (If
you're an expert, of course, you're welcome to proceed at your own risk.)