File: README.httpbench

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httpbench is a latency measurement tool.

Call it like this:

  ./httpbench -k -c 1000 -i 10 -s 5 http://127.0.0.1:8000/README.httpbench

This means that httpbench should open 500 HTTP connections to
127.0.0.1:8000, and every 10 connections it should 5 times request "/"
from the web server there.  The -k tells httpbench to run these 5
requests over the same TCP connection, using HTTP keep-alive.

The output from httpbench looks something like this:

  connecting to 127.0.0.1 port 8000
  sample 69 229
  clat 58
  clat 59
  clat 51
  clat 50
  clat 52
  clat 49
  clat 50
  clat 50
  clat 63
  clat 50
  sample 50 389
  [...]

The first line is for informational purposes.

Lines starting with "sample" give two timings, first the latency for
opening the TCP connection (which should be pretty small unless the web
server has problems calling accept() as fast as incoming connections
arrive).  The second is the average latency for writing the HTTP request
and reading the answer.  The timings are in ?s.

Lines starting with "clat" give the normal TCP connect() latency.  Since
this does not incur any actual work for the HTTP server (besides getting
the event and calling accept()), this should be uniformly small.

Here are a few useful command lines to plot this with gnuplot:

  plot "linux.log" using ($2) title "Linux 2.6: connect latency" with histeps

  plot "linux.log" using ($3) title "Linux 2.6: response latency" with histeps

httpbench can also be used to measure throughput.  To do that, run it
with -c 1 and give the URL to a large file (an ISO image or movie file >
100 MB is good).  The output will look something like this:

  connecting to 127.0.0.1 port 80
  tput 21414
  tput 25054
  tput 25473
  tput 13086
  tput 22462
  tput 110
  tput 25104
  tput 23306
  tput 25026
  tput 25067
  tput 25453
  tput 22296
  tput 25709
  tput 25394
  tput 25141
  tput 23719
  tput 24419
  tput 25089
  tput 25459
  tput 23715
  tput 24156
  tput 25413
  tput 24975
  tput 23840
  tput 24563
  tput 25072
  tput 25451
  [...]

This is from my external firewire hard disk over the loopback interface.
There will be one tput line per megabyte downloaded.  The number is
1000000000 divided by the number of ?sec it took to download this
megabyte, i.e. the average number of kilobytes per second.