File: INSTALL

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geos 3.7.1-1
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Compatibility notes
===================

OS/X 10.6, compile with gcc-4.0 rather than the default gcc that 
comes with XCode.

  CC=gcc-4.0 CXX=g++-4.0 ./configure

Quickstart
==========

As root:

   ./configure
   make
   make install

The default install location for GEOS is /usr/local.

Linux: Make sure that /usr/local/lib is added to /etc/ld.so.conf 
       Make sure that you run /sbin/ldconfig afterwards 

Solaris: Make sure that /usr/local/lib is added to LD_LIBRARY_PATH


Basic Installation
==================

The simplest way to compile this package is:


  1. `cd' to the directory containing the package's source code and type
     `./configure' to configure the package for your system.  If you're
     using `csh' on an old version of System V, you might need to type
     `sh ./configure' instead to prevent `csh' from trying to execute
     `configure' itself.

     Running `configure' takes awhile.  While running, it prints some
     messages telling which features it is checking for.

  2. Type `make' to compile the package.

  3. Optionally, type `make check' to run any self-tests that come with
     the package.

  4. Type `make install' to install the programs and any data files and
     documentation.

  5. You can remove the program binaries and object files from the
     source code directory by typing `make clean'.  To also remove the
     files that `configure' created (so you can compile the package for
     a different kind of computer), type `make distclean'.  There is
     also a `make maintainer-clean' target, but that is intended mainly
     for the package's developers.  If you use it, you may have to get
     all sorts of other programs in order to regenerate files that came
     with the distribution.


Compilers and Options
=====================

   Some systems require unusual options for compilation or linking that
the `configure' script does not know about.  You can give `configure'
initial values for variables by setting them in the environment.  Using
a Bourne-compatible shell, you can do that on the command line like
this:
     CC=c89 CFLAGS=-O2 LIBS=-lposix ./configure

Or on systems that have the `env' program, you can do it like this:
     env CPPFLAGS=-I/usr/local/include LDFLAGS=-s ./configure


Installation Names
==================

   By default, `make install' will install the package's files in
`/usr/local/bin', `/usr/local/man', etc.  You can specify an
installation prefix other than `/usr/local' by giving `configure' the
option `--prefix=PATH'.


Operation Controls
==================

`configure' recognizes the following options to control how it
operates.

--cache-file=FILE
     Use and save the results of the tests in FILE instead of
     `./config.cache'.  Set FILE to `/dev/null' to disable caching, for
     debugging `configure'.

--help
     Print a summary of the options to `configure', and exit.

--quiet
--silent
-q
     Do not print messages saying which checks are being made.  To
     suppress all normal output, redirect it to `/dev/null' (any error
     messages will still be shown).

--srcdir=DIR
     Look for the package's source code in directory DIR.  Usually
     `configure' can determine that directory automatically.

--version
     Print the version of Autoconf used to generate the `configure'
     script, and exit.

--prefix
     Change the default installation location

`configure' also accepts some other, not widely useful, options.