File: INSTALL-ecm

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Instructions to install GMP-ECM:

0) you first need to install the GNU MP (GMP) library.
   GNU MP is available from <http://gmplib.org/>.

   Remark: GNU MP is already installed in most Linux distributions.
   However it is often an old version, moreover without processor-specific
   optimizations. If you care about efficiency, be sure to install the
   latest version of GNU MP (6.1.0 as of February 2016), and to compile it
   for your particular processor.
   Warning: make sure you have only one version of GMP installed on your
   system at a given time. Frequently, after compiling GMP from source
   and installing it without removing the distribution's GMP package,
   later attempts to build software that uses GMP find the GMP header 
   file from the distribution's GMP package and the library from the 
   newly compiled GMP (or vice versa). GMP-ECM tries to detect this by
   comparing the version number from header and library; if this test 
   fails, you should remove the obsolete GMP installation.

1) check your configuration with:

   $ ./configure

   The configure script accepts several options (see ./configure --help).
   In particular you can specify the GMP installation directory with:

   $ ./configure --with-gmp=<gmpdir>

   where <gmpdir>/include contains the header file gmp.h, and <gmpdir>/lib
   contains the static or dynamic libraries (libgmp.a, libgmp.so, libgmp.lib).
 
   To compile the GMP-ECM library as a shared library, use the
   --enable-shared parameter for ./configure. Building a shared library is
   disabled by default.

   Note: the configure script will first search for a static GMP library, which
   makes GMP-ECM more efficient. When only a dynamic library is available, make
   sure to correctly set your dynamic libraries search path (LD_LIBRARY_PATH
   on Unix systems), otherwise the configure script may fail.

   Warning: it is recommended to use the same compiler and options as those
   used to compile GMP, otherwise the compilation may fail, or you may get
   poor performance. In the GMP build directory, simply type:

   $ egrep -w '(CC|CFLAGS)' config.log

   to see which compiler and options were used to build GMP. For example
   on a Sparc v9 you may have to type:
   
   $ ./configure CC=cc CFLAGS="-fast -fns=no -fsimple=1 -xarch=v9" 
   
   Note 2: On x86, x86-64, and 64 bit PowerPC systems, using GMP-ECM's 
   own modular multiplication code usually gives better performance than 
   the GMP-based functions. On these systems, configure enables it by 
   default. If the system is not identified correctly, you can enable 
   it by adding the command line parameter "--enable-asm-redc" to 
   configure. To disable it, add "--disable-asm-redc".
   On 32-bit x86 systems that have SSE2 (e.g., Pentium 4, some Celeron, 
   some Sempron, Via C7), use of SSE2 instructions in stage 2 of P-1, P+1, 
   and ECM is enabled by default. You can enable it manually by adding the
   command line parameter "--enable-sse2" and disable it by adding 
   "--disable-sse2" to ./configure. The SSE2 code is not used in 64-bit
   builds, regardless of these parameters.

   Note 3: If you want to use George Woltman's GWNUM library for speeding up
   factoring base 2 numbers, obtain the source file from
   <ftp://mersenne.org/gimps/> (on December 2011 the latest source is
   source272.zip), build the gwnum library for your operating system, then use

   $ ./configure --with-gwnum=<gwnum directory>

   The directory must include the gwnum.a or gwnum.lib file as well as 
   gwnum.h and related header files. The source file of the gwnum library
   is available at <http://www.mersenne.org/source.htm>.

2) compile the program with:

   $ make

   This will create the 'libecm.a' library, the 'libecm.so' shared
   library if --enable-shared was used, the 'ecm' binary file,
   the 'ecmfactor' binary file (sample use of libecm.a), and 'tune',
   a tuning program.

3) to check that the program works correctly, type:

   $ make check

   This will run several tests for P+1, P-1, ECM. These tests take a few
   minutes. It should normally end with "All ECM tests are ok."

4) (optional) to tune GMP-ECM, simply type:

   $ make ecm-params; make

   See also README ("How to get the best of GMP-ECM?"). Note: if your machine
   has not enough memory for the tune program, you can run it manually with
   ./tune -max_log2_len 16 for example (the default is 18).

5) (optional) you can then install the ecm binary and its man page:

   $ make install

   By default, installation will be done in /usr/local.
   You can change with the --prefix option of configure at step 1:
   
   $ ./configure --prefix=<my_installation_directory>

   The ecm binary will go in <my_installation_directory>/bin,
   its man page in <my_installation_directory>/share/man/man1,
   the ecm library in <my_installation_directory>/lib,
   and the corresponding header file in <my_installation_directory>/include.

   You can also do "make uninstall" to remove those files.

6) If you like GMP-ECM, please help us factoring Cunningham numbers. First
   download "cunningham.in" on <http://www.loria.fr/~zimmerma/ecmnet/>, then
   perform one ecm test with B1=110e6 on each number of this file:

   $ ./ecm 110e6 < cunningham.in > cunningham.out &

   If you find any factor (grep found cunningham.out), please submit it
   using the report form on <http://www.loria.fr/~zimmerma/ecmnet/>.

============================================================================

To install GMP-ECM with support of NVIDIA Graphics Cards: see README.gpu

============================================================================

Known problems:

* [reported by Sam Rawlins] with MinGW under Windows XP (32-bit), the
  compilation fails in spv.c. A fix seems to add -msse2 to CFLAGS.
  See http://lists.gforge.inria.fr/pipermail/ecm-discuss/2010-June/004077.html
* GCC 4.4 might miscompile GMP-ECM on Sparc,
  see http://gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=45559 for more details.
  The problem is due in fact to a bug in the Linux kernel. A fix is to use
  -mcpu=v8 with GCC 4.4 if the bug occurs.

============================================================================

For Windows users:

Windows users have two options for building GMP-ECM: (a) the use of a
number of Unix on Windows environments, or (b) the use of Microsoft
Visual Studio C/C++ 2008.  The former is described here while the latter
is described in the readme.txt file within the build.vc10 subdirectory.

(a) For Windows users with a Unix-like environment:

Before you can compile GMP-ECM, you will need a compiler. Several suitable
compilers are freely available, for example as part of MinGW, CygWin and 
Microsoft's Services for Unix (SFU). We recommend MinGW as it is a smaller 
download than the others and generates binaries that run on any Windows 
system, even if they don't have MinGW installed themselves.

Step-by-step instructions, courtesy of Jes Hansen:

1) Download the current MinGW from
   http://prdownloads.sf.net/mingw/MinGW-3.1.0-1.exe?download
   and MSYS from http://prdownloads.sf.net/mingw/MSYS-1.0.10.exe?download

2) Create a folder, for example C:\GNU, and install MinGW (execute the 
   MinGW-3.1.0-1.exe file) into C:\GNU\MinGW

3) Install MSYS (execute the MSYS-1.0.10.exe file) into C:\GNU\msys
   Now you get an icon on the desktop where you can start the MinSys. Do
   this, because is creates your home folder. Then exit it again.

4) Download the latest version of GMP in .tar.gz format from
   http://gmplib.org/ and place it in your newly created home folder.
   The home folder is in C:\GNU\msys\home and has the same name as your
   Windows login name.

5) Download GMP-ECM (if you do not have it already) from
   http://ecm.gforge.inria.fr/ and place it in your home folder as well.

6) Start the MinSys up again from the desktop and type 
   tar -xvzf gmp-6.1.0.tar.gz
   cd gmp-6.1.0
   ./configure
   make install
   cd ~

7) You are back in your home directory. Now type
   tar -xvzf ecm-x.y.z.tar.gz
   cd ecm-x.y.z
   ./configure --with-gmp=/usr/local
   make

8) Four executables should have appeared. The main application is ecm.exe,
   which can be run from the Windows command line.

============================================================================

In case of a problem, report it to us, with:

- the output of the config.log file

- the versions of GMP-ECM and GMP used (first output line), for example:
  
  GMP-ECM x.y.z [configured with GMP u.v.w, --enable-asm-redc] [P+1]

- the detailed input enabling us to reproduce the problem, for example:

  $ echo 328006342451 | ./ecm -pp1 -x0 5 120 7043

- the output you get.

Then send your bug report at <ecm-discuss@lists.gforge.inria.fr>.
This is a public list, with archives available at
<http://lists.gforge.inria.fr/pipermail/ecm-discuss/>.