File: INSTALL

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gtkmathview 0.6.5-1
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There are three basic steps to building and installing the
GIMP on unix:

  1. You need to have installed the following libraries:
     - GTK version 1.2.x or better (http://www.gtk.org)
     - libxml version 2.x.y (http://xmlsoft.org)
       NEW: with version 0.1.1 of gtkmathview has been added
       backward compatibility with versions 1.x.y of libxml
       because of its widespread use, however that versions have
       some annoying bugs, in particular they don't handle
       correctly Unicode character references inside the document
       (e.g. α) so it is strongly suggested to upgrade
       to libxml2 if possibile (and to use accordingly the
       --enable-libxml2 option when running ./configure, see
       below for a complete list of options).
  2. Configure GtkMathView by running the `configure' script.
  3. Build GtkMathView by running `make'.
  4. Install GtkMathView libraries and include files
     by running `make install'.

Generic instructions for configuring and compiling auto-configured
packages are included below. Here is an illustration of commands that
might be used to build and install GtkMathView. The actual configuration,
compilation and installation output is not shown.

  % tar xvfz gtkmathview-x.y.z.tar.gz   # unpack the sources
  % cd gtkmathview-x.y.z                # change to the toplevel directory
  % ./configure                         # run the `configure' script
  % make                                # build the library
  % make install                        # install the library (must be root)

The `configure' script examines your system, and adapts GtkMathView to
run on it. The script has many options, some of which are described in
the generic instructions included at the end of this file. All of the
options can be listed using the command `./configure --help'. There
are six commands special options the GIMP `configure' script
recognizes. These are:

  1. --enable-shared and --disable-shared. This option affects whether
     shared libraries will be built or not. Shared libraries provide
     for much smaller executables, but they are difficult to debug
     with. If you are interested in doing development, it is probably
     wise to specify `--disable-shared'. The default is to enable
     shared libraries.

  2. --enable-checks and --disable-checks. This option causes the build
     process to compile with debugging enabled. If debugging is
     disabled, the GIMP will instead be compiled with optimizations turned
     on. The default is for debugging to be disabled. NOTE: This
     option is intended primarily as a convenience for developers.

  3. --enable-helm and --disable-helm. This option causes the
     compilation of some features to achieve more sophisticated
     interacting capabilities with the widget. Is it usually turned
     on in the context of the HELM project, but you might find
     something useful (see the section about interaction in the
     reference manual).

  4. --enable-stats and --disable-stats. This option enables or
     disables the computation of some statistics about MathML
     documents processed by the widget. It can be useful for architectural
     decisions.

  5. --enable-floating and --disable-floating. If enabled, internal
     computation will be done by the widget in floating-point rather than
     fixed-point arithmetics. It is slower, but it can be useful to test
     whether fixed-point has some significant loss of precision.

  6. --with-libxml2 and --without-libxml2. Enable this if you have
     installed version 2.x of libxml, disable otherwise. This is
     required because there are some incompatibilities between the
     versions. However, usage of version 2 is recommended. Remember
     that both libxml2 and libxml2-devel packages must be installed
     (the same holds also for version 1.x). If no explicit value
     is given, then the configuration script tries to guess it.

  7. --with-t1lib and --without-t1lib. Enable this if you have
     installed version 1.x of t1lib, disable otherwise. t1lib
     will enable to render Type1 fonts with anti-aliasing and
     kerning. If no explicit value is given, then the configuration
     script tries to guess it.

      Generic Instructions for Building Auto-Configured Packages
      ==========================================================


To compile this package:

1.  Configure the package for your system.  In the directory that this
file is in, type `./configure'.  If you're using `csh' on an old
version of System V, you might need to type `sh configure' instead to
prevent `csh' from trying to execute `configure' itself.

The `configure' shell script attempts to guess correct values for
various system-dependent variables used during compilation, and
creates the Makefile(s) (one in each subdirectory of the source
directory).  In some packages it creates a C header file containing
system-dependent definitions.  It also creates a file `config.status'
that you can run in the future to recreate the current configuration.
Running `configure' takes a minute or two.

To compile the package in a different directory from the one
containing the source code, you must use GNU make.  `cd' to the
directory where you want the object files and executables to go and
run `configure' with the option `--srcdir=DIR', where DIR is the
directory that contains the source code.  Using this option is
actually unnecessary if the source code is in the parent directory of
the one in which you are compiling; `configure' automatically checks
for the source code in `..' if it does not find it in the current
directory.

By default, `make install' will install the package's files in
/usr/local/bin, /usr/local/lib, /usr/local/man, etc.  You can specify
an installation prefix other than /usr/local by giving `configure' the
option `--prefix=PATH'.  Alternately, you can do so by changing the
`prefix' variable in the Makefile that `configure' creates (the
Makefile in the top-level directory, if the package contains
subdirectories).

You can specify separate installation prefixes for machine-specific
files and machine-independent files.  If you give `configure' the
option `--exec-prefix=PATH', the package will use PATH as the prefix
for installing programs and libraries.  Normally, all files are
installed using the same prefix.

`configure' ignores any other arguments that you give it.

If your system requires unusual options for compilation or linking
that `configure' doesn't know about, you can give `configure' initial
values for some variables by setting them in the environment.  In
Bourne-compatible shells, you can do that on the command line like
this:
        CC='gcc -traditional' DEFS=-D_POSIX_SOURCE ./configure

The `make' variables that you might want to override with environment
variables when running `configure' are:

(For these variables, any value given in the environment overrides the
value that `configure' would choose:)
CC              C compiler program.
                Default is `cc', or `gcc' if `gcc' is in your PATH.
INSTALL         Program to use to install files.
                Default is `install' if you have it, `cp' otherwise.
INCLUDEDIR      Directory for `configure' to search for include files.
                Default is /usr/include.

(For these variables, any value given in the environment is added to
the value that `configure' chooses:)
DEFS            Configuration options, in the form '-Dfoo -Dbar ...'
LIBS            Libraries to link with, in the form '-lfoo -lbar ...'

If you need to do unusual things to compile the package, we encourage
you to teach `configure' how to do them and mail the diffs to the
address given in the README so we can include them in the next
release.

2.  Type `make' to compile the package.

3.  Type `make install' to install programs, data files, and
documentation.

4.  You can remove the program binaries and object files from the
source directory by typing `make clean'.  To also remove the
Makefile(s), the header file containing system-dependent definitions
(if the package uses one), and `config.status' (all the files that
`configure' created), type `make distclean'.

The file `configure.in' is used as a template to create `configure' by
a program called `autoconf'.  You will only need it if you want to
regenerate `configure' using a newer version of `autoconf'.