File: 03_before-install.po

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msgid ""
msgstr ""
"Project-Id-Version: 0\n"
"POT-Creation-Date: 2018-03-19 00:26+0100\n"
"PO-Revision-Date: 2018-03-19 00:26+0100\n"
"Last-Translator: Automatically generated\n"
"Language-Team: None\n"
"Language: en-US \n"
"MIME-Version: 1.0\n"
"Content-Type: application/x-publican; charset=UTF-8\n"
"Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit\n"
"X-Generator: Publican v4.3.2\n"

msgid "Before and during the installation"
msgstr ""

msgid "Choose a BIOS password"
msgstr ""

msgid "Before you install any operating system on your computer, set up a BIOS password. After installation (once you have enabled bootup from the hard disk) you should go back to the BIOS and change the boot sequence to disable booting from floppy, CD-ROM and other devices that shouldn't boot. Otherwise a cracker only needs physical access and a boot disk to access your entire system."
msgstr ""

msgid "Disabling booting unless a password is supplied is even better. This can be very effective if you run a server, because it is not rebooted very often. The downside to this tactic is that rebooting requires human intervention which can cause problems if the machine is not easily accessible."
msgstr ""

msgid "Note: many BIOSes have well known default master passwords, and applications also exist to retrieve the passwords from the BIOS. Corollary: don't depend on this measure to secure console access to system."
msgstr ""

msgid "Partitioning the system"
msgstr ""

msgid "Choose an intelligent partition scheme"
msgstr ""

msgid "An intelligent partition scheme depends on how the machine is used. A good rule of thumb is to be fairly liberal with your partitions and to pay attention to the following factors:"
msgstr ""

msgid "Any directory tree which a user has write permissions to, such as e.g. <filename>/home</filename>, <filename>/tmp</filename> and <filename>/var/tmp/</filename>, should be on a separate partition. This reduces the risk of a user DoS by filling up your \"/\" mount point and rendering the system unusable (Note: this is not strictly true, since there is always some space reserved for root which a normal user cannot fill), and it also prevents hardlink attacks. <footnote><para> A very good example of this kind of attacks using /tmp is detailed in <ulink name=\"The mysteriously persistently exploitable program (contest)\" url=\"http://www.hackinglinuxexposed.com/articles/20031111.html\" /> and <ulink name=\"The mysteriously persistently exploitable program explained\" url=\"http://www.hackinglinuxexposed.com/articles/20031214.html\" /> (notice that the incident is Debian-related). It is basicly an attack in which a local user <emphasis>stashes</emphasis> away a vulnerable setuid application by making a hard link to it, effectively avoiding any updates (or removal) of the binary itself made by the system administrator. Dpkg was recently fixed to prevent this (see <ulink name=\"225692\" url=\"http://bugs.debian.org/225692\" />) but other setuid binaries (not controlled by the package manager) are at risk if partitions are not setup correctly. </para></footnote>"
msgstr ""

msgid "Any partition which can fluctuate, e.g. <filename>/var</filename> (especially <filename>/var/log</filename>) should also be on a separate partition. On a Debian system, you should create <filename>/var</filename> a little bit bigger than on other systems, because downloaded packages (the apt cache) are stored in <filename>/var/cache/apt/archives</filename>."
msgstr ""

msgid "Any partition where you want to install non-distribution software should be on a separate partition. According to the File Hierarchy Standard, this is <filename>/opt</filename> or <filename>/usr/local</filename>. If these are separate partitions, they will not be erased if you (have to) reinstall Debian itself."
msgstr ""

msgid "From a security point of view, it makes sense to try to move static data to its own partition, and then mount that partition read-only. Better yet, put the data on read-only media. See below for more details."
msgstr ""

msgid "In the case of a mail server it is important to have a separate partition for the mail spool. Remote users (either knowingly or unknowingly) can fill the mail spool (<filename>/var/mail</filename> and/or <filename>/var/spool/mail</filename>). If the spool is on a separate partition, this situation will not render the system unusable. Otherwise (if the spool directory is on the same partition as <filename>/var</filename>) the system might have important problems: log entries will not be created, packages cannot be installed, and some programs might even have problems starting up (if they use <filename>/var/run</filename>)."
msgstr ""

msgid "Also, for partitions in which you cannot be sure of the needed space, installing Logical Volume Manager (<application>lvm-common</application> and the needed binaries for your kernel, this might be either <application>lvm10</application>, <application>lvm6</application>, or <application>lvm5</application>). Using <literal>lvm</literal>, you can create volume groups that expand multiple physical volumes."
msgstr ""

msgid "Selecting the appropriate file systems"
msgstr ""

msgid "During the system partitioning you also have to decide which file system you want to use. The default file system<footnote><para>Since Debian GNU/Linux 4.0, codename <literal>etch</literal></para></footnote> selected in the Debian installation for Linux partitions is <literal>ext3</literal>, a journaling file system. It is recommended that you always use a journaling file system, such as <literal>ext3</literal>, <literal>reiserfs</literal>, <literal>jfs</literal> or <literal>xfs</literal>, to minimize the problems derived from a system crash in the following cases:"
msgstr ""

msgid "for laptops in all the file systems installed. That way if you run out of battery unexpectedly or the system freezes due to a hardware issue (such as X configuration which is somewhat common) you will be less likely to lose data during a hardware reboot."
msgstr ""

msgid "for production systems which store large amounts of data (like mail servers, ftp servers, network file systems...) it is recommended on these partitions. That way, in the event of a system crash, the server will take less time to recover and check the file systems, and data loss will be less likely."
msgstr ""

msgid "Leaving aside the performance issues regarding journalling file systems (since this can sometimes turn into a religious war), it is usually better to use the <literal>ext3</literal> file system. The reason for this is that it is backwards compatible with <literal>ext2</literal>, so if there are any issues with the journalling you can disable it and still have a working file system. Also, if you need to recover the system with a bootdisk (or CD-ROM) you do not need a custom kernel. If the kernel is 2.4 or 2.6 <literal>ext3</literal> support is already available, if it is a 2.2 kernel you will be able to boot the file system even if you lose journalling capabilities. If you are using other journalling file systems you will find that you might not be able to recover unless you have a 2.4 or 2.6 kernel with the needed modules built-in. If you are stuck with a 2.2 kernel on the rescue disk, it might be even more difficult to have it access <literal>reiserfs</literal> or <literal>xfs</literal>."
msgstr ""

msgid "In any case, data integrity might be better under <literal>ext3</literal> since it does file-data journalling while others do only meta-data journalling, see <ulink url=\"http://lwn.net/2001/0802/a/ext3-modes.php3\" />."
msgstr ""

msgid "Notice, however, that there are some partitions that might not benefit from using a journaling filesystem. For example, if you are using a separate partition for <filename>/tmp/</filename> you might be better off using a standard <literal>ext2</literal> filesystem as it will be cleaned up when the system boots."
msgstr ""

msgid "Do not plug to the Internet until ready"
msgstr ""

msgid "The system should not be immediately connected to the Internet during installation. This could sound stupid but network installation is a common method. Since the system will install and activate services immediately, if the system is connected to the Internet and the services are not properly configured you are opening it to attack."
msgstr ""

msgid "Also note that some services might have security vulnerabilities not fixed in the packages you are using for installation. This is usually true if you are installing from old media (like CD-ROMs). In this case, the system could even be compromised before you finish installation!"
msgstr ""

msgid "Since Debian installation and upgrades can be done over the Internet you might think it is a good idea to use this feature on installation. If the system is going to be directly connected to the Internet (and not protected by a firewall or NAT), it is best to install without connection to the Internet, using a local packages mirror for both the Debian package sources and the security updates. You can set up package mirrors by using another system connected to the Internet with Debian-specific tools (if it's a Debian system) like <application>apt-move</application> or <application>apt-proxy</application>, or other common mirroring tools, to provide the archive to the installed system. If you cannot do this, you can set up firewall rules to limit access to the system while doing the update (see <xref linkend=\"fw-security-update\" />)."
msgstr ""

msgid "Set a root password"
msgstr ""

msgid "Setting a good root password is the most basic requirement for having a secure system. See <citerefentry><refentrytitle>passwd</refentrytitle><manvolnum>1</manvolnum></citerefentry> for some hints on how to create good passwords. You can also use an automatic password generation program to do this for you (see <xref linkend=\"user-pwgen\" />)."
msgstr ""

msgid "Plenty of information on choosing good passwords can be found on the Internet; two that provide a decent summary and rationale are Eric Wolfram's <ulink name=\"How to: Pick a Safe Password\" url=\"http://wolfram.org/writing/howto/password.html\" /> and Walter Belgers' <ulink name=\"Unix Password Security\" url=\"http://www.belgers.com/write/pwseceng.txt\" />"
msgstr ""

msgid "Run the minimum number of services required"
msgstr ""

msgid "Services are programs such as ftp servers and web servers. Since they have to be <emphasis>listening</emphasis> for incoming connections that request the service, external computers can connect to yours. Services are sometimes vulnerable (i.e. can be compromised under a given attack) and hence present a security risk."
msgstr ""

msgid "You should not install services which are not needed on your machine. Every installed service might introduce new, perhaps not obvious (or known), security holes on your computer."
msgstr ""

msgid "As you may already know, when you install a given service the default behavior is to activate it. In a default Debian installation, with no services installed, the number of running services is quite low and the number of network-oriented services is even lower. In a default Debian 3.1 standard installation you will end up with OpenSSH, Exim (depending on how you configured it) and the RPC portmapper available as network services<footnote><para>The footprint in Debian 3.0 and earlier releases wasn't as tight, since some <command>inetd</command> services were enabled by default. Also standard installations of Debian 2.2 installed the NFS server as well as the telnet server.</para></footnote>. If you did not go through a standard installation but selected an expert installation you can end up with no active network services. The RPC portmapper is installed by default because it is needed for many services, for example NFS, to run on a given system. However, it can be easily removed, see <xref linkend=\"rpc\" /> for more information on how to secure or disable RPC services."
msgstr ""

msgid "When you install a new network-related service (daemon) in your Debian GNU/Linux system it can be enabled in two ways: through the <command>inetd</command> superdaemon (i.e. a line will be added to <filename>/etc/inetd.conf</filename>) or through a standalone program that binds itself to your network interfaces. Standalone programs are controlled through the <filename>/etc/init.d</filename> files, which are called at boot time through the SysV mechanism (or an alternative one) by using symlinks in <filename>/etc/rc?.d/*</filename> (for more information on how this is done read <filename>/usr/share/doc/sysvinit/README.runlevels.gz</filename>)."
msgstr ""

msgid "If you want to keep some services but use them rarely, use the <command>update-*</command> commands, e.g. <command>update-inetd</command> and <command>update-rc.d</command> to remove them from the startup process. For more information on how to disable network services read <xref linkend=\"disableserv\" />. If you want to change the default behaviour of starting up services on installation of their associated packages<footnote><para>This is desirable if you are setting up a development chroot, for example.</para></footnote> use <command>policy-rc.d</command>, please read <filename>/usr/share/doc/sysv-rc/README.policy-rc.d.gz</filename> for more information."
msgstr ""

msgid "<command>invoke-rc.d</command> support is mandatory in Debian, which means that for Debian 4.0 <emphasis>etch</emphasis> and later releases you can write a policy-rc.d file that forbids starting new daemons before you configure them. Although no such scripts are packaged yet, they are quite simple to write. See <application>policyrcd-script-zg2</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "Disabling daemon services"
msgstr ""

msgid "Disabling a daemon service is quite simple. You either remove the package providing the program for that service or you remove or rename the startup links under <filename>/etc/rc${runlevel}.d/</filename>. If you rename them make sure they do not begin with 'S' so that they don't get started by <command>/etc/init.d/rc</command>. Do not remove all the available links or the package management system will regenerate them on package upgrades, make sure you leave at least one link (typically a 'K', i.e. kill, link). For more information read <ulink name=\"Customizing runlevels\" url=\"http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/reference/ch-system.en.html#s-custombootscripts\" /> section of the Debian Reference (Chapter 2 - Debian fundamentals)."
msgstr ""

msgid "You can remove these links manually or using <literal>update-rc.d</literal> (see <citerefentry><refentrytitle>update-rc.d</refentrytitle><manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry>). For example, you can disable a service from executing in the multi-user runlevels by doing:"
msgstr ""

msgid "\n"
"  # update-rc.d <varname>name</varname> stop <varname>XX</varname> 2 3 4 5 ."
msgstr ""

msgid "Where <emphasis>XX</emphasis> is a number that determines when the stop action for that service will be executed. Please note that, if you are <emphasis>not</emphasis> using <application>file-rc</application>, <literal>update-rc.d -f <varname>service</varname> remove</literal> will not work properly, since <emphasis>all</emphasis> links are removed, upon re-installation or upgrade of the package these links will be re-generated (probably not what you wanted). If you think this is not intuitive you are probably right (see <ulink name=\"Bug 67095\" url=\"http://bugs.debian.org/67095\" />). From the manpage:"
msgstr ""

msgid ""
"\n"
"  If any files /etc/rc<varname>runlevel</varname>.d/[SK]??name already exist then\n"
"  update-rc.d does nothing.  This is so that the system administrator \n"
"  can rearrange the  links,  provided that  they  leave  at  least one\n"
"  link remaining, without having their configuration overwritten."
msgstr ""

msgid "If you are using <application>file-rc</application> all the information regarding services bootup is handled by a common configuration file and is maintained even if packages are removed from the system."
msgstr ""

msgid "You can use the TUI (Text User Interface) provided by <application>sysv-rc-conf</application> to do all these changes easily (<command>sysv-rc-conf</command> works both for <application>file-rc</application> and normal System V runlevels). You will also find similar GUIs for desktop systems. You can also use the command line interface of <application>sysv-rc-conf</application>:"
msgstr ""

msgid "\n"
"  # sysv-rc-conf foobar off"
msgstr ""

msgid "The advantage of using this utility is that the rc.d links are returned to the status they had before the 'off' call if you re-enable the service with:"
msgstr ""

msgid "\n"
"  # sysv-rc-conf foobar on"
msgstr ""

msgid "Other (less recommended) methods of disabling services are:"
msgstr ""

msgid "Removing the <filename>/etc/init.d/<varname>service_name</varname></filename> script and removing the startup links using:"
msgstr ""

msgid "\n"
"  # update-rc.d <varname>name</varname> remove"
msgstr ""

msgid "Move the script file (<filename>/etc/init.d/<varname>service_name</varname></filename>) to another name (for example <filename>/etc/init.d/OFF.<varname>service_name</varname></filename>). This will leave dangling symlinks under <filename>/etc/rc${runlevel}.d/</filename> and will generate error messages when booting up the system."
msgstr ""

msgid "Remove the execute permission from the <filename>/etc/init.d/<varname>service_name</varname></filename> file. That will also generate error messages when booting."
msgstr ""

msgid "Edit the <filename>/etc/init.d/<varname>service_name</varname></filename> script to have it stop immediately once it is executed (by adding an <command>exit 0</command> line at the beginning or commenting out the <literal>start-stop-daemon</literal> part in it). If you do this, you will not be able to use the script to startup the service manually later on."
msgstr ""

msgid "Nevertheless, the files under <filename>/etc/init.d</filename> are configuration files and should not get overwritten due to package upgrades if you have made local changes to them."
msgstr ""

msgid "Unlike other (UNIX) operating systems, services in Debian cannot be disabled by modifying files in <filename>/etc/default/<varname>service_name</varname></filename>."
msgstr ""

msgid "FIXME: Add more information on handling daemons using <application>file-rc</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "Disabling <command>inetd</command> or its services"
msgstr ""

msgid "You should check if you really need the <command>inetd</command> daemon nowadays. Inetd was always a way to compensate for kernel deficiencies, but those have been taken care of in modern Linux kernels. Denial of Service possibilities exist against <command>inetd</command> (which can increase the machine's load tremendously), and many people always preferred using stand-alone daemons instead of calling services via <command>inetd</command>. If you still want to run some kind of <command>inetd</command> service, then at least switch to a more configurable Inet daemon like <command>xinetd</command>, <command>rlinetd</command> or <command>openbsd-inetd</command>."
msgstr ""

msgid "You should stop all unneeded Inetd services on your system, like <command>echo</command>, <command>chargen</command>, <command>discard</command>, <command>daytime</command>, <command>time</command>, <command>talk</command>, <command>ntalk</command> and r-services (<command>rsh</command>, <command>rlogin</command> and <command>rcp</command>) which are considered HIGHLY insecure (use <command>ssh</command> instead)."
msgstr ""

msgid "You can disable services by editing <filename>/etc/inetd.conf</filename> directly, but Debian provides a better alternative: <literal>update-inetd</literal> (which comments the services in a way that it can easily be turned on again). You could remove the <command>telnet</command> daemon by executing this commands to change the config file and to restart the daemon (in this case the <command>telnet</command> service is disabled):"
msgstr ""

msgid "\n"
"  /usr/sbin/update-inetd --disable telnet"
msgstr ""

msgid "If you do want services listening, but do not want to have them listen on all IP addresses of your host, you might want to use an undocumented feature on <command>inetd</command> (replace service name with service@ip syntax) or use an alternative <command>inetd</command> daemon like <command>xinetd</command>."
msgstr ""

msgid "Install the minimum amount of software required"
msgstr ""

msgid "Debian comes with <emphasis>a lot</emphasis> of software, for example the Debian 3.0 <emphasis>woody</emphasis> release includes 6 or 7 (depending on architecture) CD-ROMs of software and thousands of packages, and the Debian 3.1 <emphasis>sarge</emphasis> release ships with around 13 CD-ROMs of software. With so much software, and even if the base system installation is quite reduced <footnote><para>For example, in Debian woody it is around 400-500 Mbs, try this: <screen> $ size=0 $ for i in `grep -A 1 -B 1 \"^Section: base\" /var/lib/dpkg/available | grep -A 2 \"^Priority: required\" |grep \"^Installed-Size\" |cut -d : -f 2 `; do size=$(($size+$i)); done $ echo $size 47762 </screen> </para></footnote> you might get carried away and install more than is really needed for your system."
msgstr ""

msgid "Since you already know what the system is for (don't you?) you should only install software that is really needed for it to work. Any unnecessary tool that is installed might be used by a user that wants to compromise the system or by an external intruder that has gotten shell access (or remote code execution through an exploitable service)."
msgstr ""

msgid "The presence, for example, of development utilities (a C compiler) or interpreted languages (such as <command>perl</command> - but see below -, <command>python</command>, <command>tcl</command>...) may help an attacker compromise the system even further:"
msgstr ""

msgid "allowing him to do privilege escalation. It's easier, for example, to run local exploits in the system if there is a debugger and compiler ready to compile and test them!"
msgstr ""

msgid "providing tools that could help the attacker to use the compromised system as a <emphasis>base of attack</emphasis> against other systems. <footnote><para> Many intrusions are made just to get access to resources to do illegitimate activity (denial of service attacks, spam, rogue ftp servers, dns pollution...) rather than to obtain confidential data from the compromised system. </para></footnote>"
msgstr ""

msgid "Of course, an intruder with local shell access can download his own set of tools and execute them, and even the shell itself can be used to make complex programs. Removing unnecessary software will not help <emphasis>prevent</emphasis> the problem but will make it slightly more difficult for an attacker to proceed (and some might give up in this situation looking for easier targets). So, if you leave tools in a production system that could be used to remotely attack systems (see <xref linkend=\"vuln-asses\" />) you can expect an intruder to use them too if available."
msgstr ""

msgid "Please notice that a default installation of Debian <emphasis>sarge</emphasis> (i.e. an installation where no individual packages are selected) will install a number of development packages that are not usually needed. This is because some development packages are of <emphasis>Standard</emphasis> priority. If you are not going to do any development you can safely remove the following packages from your system, which will also help free up some space:"
msgstr ""

msgid ""
"\n"
"Package                    Size\n"
"------------------------+--------\n"
"gdb                     2,766,822\n"
"gcc-3.3                 1,570,284\n"
"dpkg-dev                  166,800\n"
"libc6-dev               2,531,564\n"
"cpp-3.3                 1,391,346\n"
"manpages-dev            1,081,408\n"
"flex                      257,678\n"
"g++                         1,384 (Note: virtual package)\n"
"linux-kernel-headers    1,377,022\n"
"bin86                      82,090\n"
"cpp                        29,446\n"
"gcc                         4,896 (Note: virtual package)\n"
"g++-3.3                 1,778,880\n"
"bison                     702,830\n"
"make                      366,138\n"
"libstdc++5-3.3-dev        774,982"
msgstr ""

msgid "This is something that is fixed in releases post-sarge, see <ulink name=\"Bug #301273\" url=\"http://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=301273\" /> and <ulink name=\"Bug #301138\" url=\"http://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=301138\" />. Due to a bug in the installation system this did not happen when installing with the installation system of the Debian 3.0 <emphasis>woody</emphasis> release."
msgstr ""

msgid "Removing Perl"
msgstr ""

msgid "You must take into account that removing <command>perl</command> might not be too easy (as a matter of fact it can be quite difficult) in a Debian system since it is used by many system utilities. Also, the <application>perl-base</application> is <emphasis>Priority: required</emphasis> (that about says it all). It's still doable, but you will not be able to run any <command>perl</command> application in the system; you will also have to fool the package management system to think that the <application>perl-base</application> is installed even if it's not. <footnote><para>You can make (on another system) a dummy package with <application>equivs</application>. </para></footnote>"
msgstr ""

msgid "Which utilities use <command>perl</command>? You can see for yourself:"
msgstr ""

msgid ""
"\n"
"  $ for i in /bin/* /sbin/* /usr/bin/* /usr/sbin/*; do [ -f $i ] &amp;&amp; {\n"
"  type=`file $i | grep -il perl`; [ -n \"$type\" ] &amp;&amp; echo $i; }; done"
msgstr ""

msgid "These include the following utilities in packages with priority <emphasis>required</emphasis> or <emphasis>important</emphasis>:"
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/bin/chkdupexe</filename> of package <application>util-linux</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/bin/replay</filename> of package <application>bsdutils</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/cleanup-info</filename> of package <application>dpkg</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/dpkg-divert</filename> of package <application>dpkg</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/dpkg-statoverride</filename> of package <application>dpkg</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/install-info</filename> of package <application>dpkg</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/update-alternatives</filename> of package <application>dpkg</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/update-rc.d</filename> of package <application>sysvinit</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/bin/grog</filename> of package <application>groff-base</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/adduser</filename> of package <application>adduser</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/debconf-show</filename> of package <application>debconf</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/deluser</filename> of package <application>adduser</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/dpkg-preconfigure</filename> of package <application>debconf</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/dpkg-reconfigure</filename> of package <application>debconf</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/exigrep</filename> of package <application>exim</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/eximconfig</filename> of package <application>exim</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/eximstats</filename> of package <application>exim</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/exim-upgrade-to-r3</filename> of package <application>exim</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/exiqsumm</filename> of package <application>exim</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/keytab-lilo</filename> of package <application>lilo</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/liloconfig</filename> of package <application>lilo</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/lilo_find_mbr</filename> of package <application>lilo</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/syslogd-listfiles</filename> of package <application>sysklogd</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/syslog-facility</filename> of package <application>sysklogd</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "<filename>/usr/sbin/update-inetd</filename> of package <application>netbase</application>."
msgstr ""

msgid "So, without Perl and, unless you remake these utilities in shell script, you will probably not be able to manage any packages (so you will not be able to upgrade the system, which is <emphasis>not a Good Thing</emphasis>)."
msgstr ""

msgid "If you are determined to remove Perl from the Debian base system, and you have spare time, submit bug reports to the previous packages including (as a patch) replacements for the utilities above written in shell script."
msgstr ""

msgid "If you wish to check out which Debian packages depend on Perl you can use"
msgstr ""

msgid "\n"
"$ grep-available -s Package,Priority -F Depends perl"
msgstr ""

msgid "or"
msgstr ""

msgid "\n"
"$ apt-cache rdepends perl"
msgstr ""

msgid "Read the Debian security mailing lists"
msgstr ""

msgid "It is never wrong to take a look at either the debian-security-announce mailing list, where advisories and fixes to released packages are announced by the Debian security team, or at <ulink url=\"mailto:debian-security@lists.debian.org\" />, where you can participate in discussions about things related to Debian security."
msgstr ""

msgid "In order to receive important security update alerts, send an email to <ulink name=\"debian-security-announce-request@lists.debian.org\" url=\"mailto:debian-security-announce-request@lists.debian.org\" /> with the word \"subscribe\" in the subject line. You can also subscribe to this moderated email list via the web page at <ulink name=\"http://www.debian.org/MailingLists/subscribe\" url=\"http://www.debian.org/MailingLists/subscribe\" />."
msgstr ""

msgid "This mailing list has very low volume, and by subscribing to it you will be immediately alerted of security updates for the Debian distribution. This allows you to quickly download new packages with security bug fixes, which is very important in maintaining a secure system (see <xref linkend=\"security-update\" /> for details on how to do this)."
msgstr ""