File: INSTALL

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input-utils 1.0-1.1
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howto compile and install this package
======================================


really short install instructions
---------------------------------

	$ make
	$ su -c "make install"



the more detailed version
-------------------------

Make sure you use GNU make.  The file name "GNUmakefile" isn't a joke,
this package really requires GNU make.

As first step make will do some config checks on your system and write
the results to Make.config.  If you want to have a look at Make.config
before the actual build starts you can run this step separately using
"make config".

The Makefiles use the usual GNU-ish Makefile conventions for variable
names and default values, i.e. prefix=/usr/local, ...

The values for some frequently adapted variables are initialized from
the enviroment.  Thus you can change the defaults simply by setting
environment variables:

	$ prefix="/usr"
	$ CFLAGS="-O3 -mcpu=i686"
	$ export prefix CFLAGS

Almost any variable can be overridden on the make command line.  It is
often used this way to install into some buildroot for packaging ...

	$ su -c "make DESTDIR=/tmp/buildroot install"

... but it works for most other variables equally well.  There are
some exceptions through, it usually does _not_ work for CFLAGS for
example.

Try "make verbose=yes" if you want to see the complete command lines
executed by make instead of the short messages (for trouble shooting,
because you like this way, for whatever reason ...).  This also makes
the config checks performed by "make config" more verbose.

If you don't trust my Makefiles you can run "make -n install" to see
what "make install" would do on your system.  It will produce
human-readable output (unlike automake ...).

Have fun,

  Gerd

-- 
Gerd Hoffmann <kraxel@redhat.com>