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input-utils 1.0-1.1
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This is a small collection of input layer utilities.  I wrote them
mainly for testing and debugging, but maybe others find them useful
too :-)


lsinput
=======

probe and list all devices


input-event
===========

listen for events and print them.  Expects a device number as argument
(0 == /dev/input/event0, ...).

  -t <sec>   set timeout, quits after <sec> seconds without input.
             default is 10
  -g         grab device using EVIOCGRAB, i.e. get exclusive access to
             the device


input-kbd
=========

read/write keyboard maps (scancode => linux keycode).  Also expects a
device number as argument.

If the input device supports maps, it will print them to stdout.
Looks like this (AT Keyboard):

	0x0001 =  67  # KEY_F9
	0x0002 =  65  # KEY_F7
	0x0003 =  63  # KEY_F5
	0x0004 =  61  # KEY_F3
	[ ... ]

If the device doesn't support maps the utility just prints the keys
and/or buttons supported by the device (my mouse):

	bits: BTN_LEFT
	bits: BTN_RIGHT
	bits: BTN_MIDDLE

If you pass a map file via -f switch the utility will parse it and
reconfigure the device.  Syntax is identical to the maps printed out,
i.e. you can dump the current map to some file, edit it and then apply
the changes.  The key names are also accepted, i.e. both this ...

	0x0001 = 67

... and this ...

	0x0001 = KEY_F9

... works.


input-send
==========

small daemon which reads from a input device and sends it over the
network to everyone who connects.  Listens on tcp port 1234.


input-recv
==========

the receiving end for the send utility.  Connects to localhost:1234
right now and prints stuff to stderr.  Plan is to put events into
/dev/input/uinput some day which basically gives you a remote input
device.


Have fun,

  Gerd

-- 
Gerd Knorr <kraxel@bytesex.org> [SUSE Labs]