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<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//IETF//DTD HTML//EN">
<html><head>
<meta name="GENERATOR" content="Microsoft� HTML Help Workshop 4.1">
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="Leash.css">
<title>Encryption_Types</title></head>

<body>
<h1>Encryption Types</h1>
<p>
Kerberos supports several types of encryption for securing session keys
and the tickets. The type used for a particular ticket or session key
is automatically negotiated when you request a ticket or a service. </p>
<ul>
<li>When encrypting tickets, the Key Distribution Center (KDC) for your
Kerberos installation checks for an encryption type that is shared by
both the KDC and the service you are attempting to use.</li>
<li> When encrypting session keys, the KDC checks for an encryption
type shared by the KDC, the service, and the client requesting the
session (you). </li>
</ul>

<table>
<tbody><tr>
<th id="th2">How to...</th> <th id="th2">Learn about...</th></tr>
<tr>
<td>
<ul id="helpul">
<li><a href="#view"> View encryption types</a></li>
</ul>
</td>
<td>
<ul id="helpul">
<li><a href="#weak"> Weak encryption types</a></li>
<li><a href="#supported"> Supported encryption types</a></li>
<li><a href="#related-help"> Related help</a></li>
</ul>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody></table>

<p></p>
<h2><a name="weak"> Weak Encryption Types </a></h2>
<p>
In the table of Encryption Types below, some encryption types are noted as <b>weak</b>.
Most of them are encryption types that used to be strong but now, with
more computing power available, are considered weak and therefore
undesirable. However, they are still sometimes used for backwards
compatibility. If Kerberos is installed in a network that contains some
older machines running operating systems that do not support the newer
encryption types, administrators can choose to allow the weaker
encryption when connecting to the older machines.</p>
<p>
<a href="#top">Back to Top</a> </p>
<h2><a name="view">View Encryption Types</a></h2>
<ol>
<li>Click the Options tab and find the View Options panel. </li>
<li>Click the Encryption Type checkbox to select it. This opens the
Encryption Type column in the main window, showing the encryption type
associated with each of your tickets and session keys. <br>
<a href="HTML/Options_Tab.htm#using-ticket-options">How to: Use Ticket Options  Panel</a></li>
<li>Click and drag the line to the right of the Encryption Type column
header to widen the column enough to see both the ticket and session
key.</li>
<li> Click the blue triangle to the left of a principal name to see all
tickets and session keys issued to that principal. Each ticket and key
will have an entry in the Encryption type column. <br>
<a href="HTML/View_Tickets.htm">How to: View Tickets </a>
</li></ol>


<p>
<a href="#top">Back to Top</a> </p>

<a name="supported"><p></p></a>
<h2>Supported Encryption Types </h2>
<table>
<tbody><tr>
<th>Encryption Type </th>
<th>Description</th>
</tr>
<tr>
<th id="th2"> des3- </th>
   <td> The triple DES family improves on
the original DES (Data Encryption Standard) by using 3 separate 56-bit
keys. Some modes of 3DES are considered weak while others are strong
(if slow). <ul id="helpul">
<li> des3-cbc-sha1</li>
<li> des3-cbc-raw  (<b>weak</b>) </li>
<li>des3-hmac-sha1 </li>
<li>des3-cbc-sha1-kd </li>
</ul>
</td>
 </tr>
<tr>
<th id="th2"> aes </th>
     <td>The AES Advanced Encryption Standard
family, like 3DES, is a symmetric block cipher and was designed
to replace them. It can use multiple key sizes. Kerberos specifies use
for 256-bit and 128-bit keys.
<ul id="helpul">
<li> aes256-cts-hmac-sha1-96 </li>
<li> aes128-cts-hmac-sha1-96 </li>
</ul>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<th id="th2"> rc4 or <br> arcfour</th>
<td>The RC4 (Rivest Cipher 4) is a symmetric stream cipher that can use
multiple key sizes. The exportable variations are considered weak, but
other variations are strong.
<ul id="helpul">
<li> arcfour-hmac </li>
<li> rc4-hmac </li>
<li> arcfour-hmac-md5</li>
<li> arcfour-hmac-exp (<b>weak</b>) </li>
<li> rc4-hmac-exp (<b>weak</b>) </li>
<li> arcfour-hmac-md5-exp(<b>weak</b>) </li>
</ul>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody></table>
<p>
<a href="#top">Back to Top</a> </p>
<h2><a name="related-help">Related Help</a></h2>
<ul id="helpul">
<li><a href="HTML/View_Tickets.htm">View tickets</a></li>
<li><a href="HTML/Kerberos_Terminology.htm#ticket">Kerberos Terminology: Tickets</a></li>
</ul>


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