File: INSTALL

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libbinio 1.4%2Bdfsg1-6
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Installation:
-------------
Refer to the appropriate INSTALL files for your build system:

INSTALL.unix    All UNIX builds, including cygwin
INSTALL.win32   Microsoft Visual C++ builds
INSTALL.dos     WATCOM C/C++ builds

Appendix to 'INSTALL.dos':
--------------------------
The build instructions of the WATCOM build are generic and generated
automatically. They assume that the main Makefile would be called 'Makefile'.
This isn't the case for AdPlug's WATCOM build! AdPlug's WATCOM Makefile is
called 'Makefile.wat'. Thus, you have to give the commandline option
'/f Makefile.wat' every time you run a 'wmake' command. For example, to
install AdPlug, call wmake like this:

wmake /f Makefile.wat install

Do this similary with any other 'wmake' target.

CVS and UNIX:
-------------
If you checked out from CVS and use UNIX, first run:

autoreconf --install

to generate the build cruft and get the configure script. You need recent
versions of autoconf, automake and libtool to do this.

Also, you need to pass --enable-maintainer-mode to the configure script to
generate some missing files.

Extra setup for DOS and Windows builds:
---------------------------------------
After you've done all steps from 'INSTALL.dos' or 'INSTALL.win32', you have
to copy the file 'binio.h.in' to 'binio.h' (maybe overwriting it) in the
'src' subdirectory and then open it ('binio.h'). Set all #define's in the
configuration section of the file to your preferred settings. All items are
documented.

Next, substitute the biggest (in size of bytes, as returned by the sizeof()
operator) standard integer and floating-point types for @TYPE_INT@ and
@TYPE_FLOAT@, respectively. Most of the time, you would just substitute 'long'
for @TYPE_INT@ and 'double' for @TYPE_FLOAT@, but some compilers have even
longer types, like 'long long' and 'long double'. If your compiler supports one
of those, you can substitute them instead to be able to access even longer
sections within your binary streams.