File: notes_for_module_writers

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Information on creating a new processor backend to go with
Business::OnlinePayment.
-----------------------------------------------------------

NOTE: 

    These are the old v2 notes.  

    If you're writing a new module, see these first and then read
    notes_for_module_writers_v3

    If you're updating an existing module for v3, go directly to
    notes_for_module_writers_v3


Create a subclass of Business::OnlinePayment called
Business::OnlinePayment::(processor name).  You should override at least
the following functions (look at Business::OnlinePayment::AuthorizeNet as
an example).

set_defaults: set default information for server/port/path (if your processor
              is not web based you probably dont need to override these).

submit: This is the only function you _MUST_ override, the superclass function
        merely dies(), so if you dont override this, your module doesnt do
        anything.  Some of the things that submit should do:

            * Turn the data into a format usable by the online processor,
              some convenience functions (remap_fields and get_fields), are
              provided by the superclass to make this a little easier.

            * Check and make sure that all the required fields have been
              filled in (the superclass provides the function required_fields()
              which can do this for you).
            
            * IMPORTANT: If the superclass function test_transaction() returns
              true, the transaction must be submitted to the processor in test
              mode.  If your processor is unable to easily provide a test mode,
              your module should die() if test_transaction() returns true,
              this prevents accidental charges for people who thought they were
              submitting test transactions.

            * If your processor provides an option of whether or not you want
              address verification, your module should check to see if the
              require_avs() function returns true, and turn on AVS checking if
              it does.

            * Submit the transaction to the processor and collect a response.

            * Do the following with the response:
              * call server_response() with a copy of the entire unprocessed
                response, to be stored in case the user needs it in the future.
              * call is_success() with either a true or false value, indicating
                if the transaction was successful or not.
              * call result_code() with the servers result code (this is
                generally one field from the response indicating that it was
                successful or a failure, most processors provide many possible
                result codes to differentiate different types of success and
                failure).
              * If the transaction was successful, call authorization() with
                the authorization code the processor provided.
              * If the transaction was not successful, call error_message()
                with either the processor provided error message, or some
                error message to indicate why it failed.