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libcgi-ssi-perl 0.92-5
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NAME
     CGI::SSI - Use SSI from CGI scripts

SYNOPSIS
     # autotie STDOUT or any other open filehandle

       use CGI::SSI (autotie => 'STDOUT');

       print $shtml; # browser sees resulting HTML

     # or tie it yourself to any open filehandle

       use CGI::SSI;

       open(FILE,'+>'.$html_file) or die $!;
       $ssi = tie(*FILE, 'CGI::SSI', filehandle => 'FILE');
       print FILE $shtml; # HTML arrives in the file

     # or use the object-oriented interface

       use CGI::SSI;

       $ssi = CGI::SSI->new();

       $ssi->if('"$varname" =~ /^foo/');
          $html .= $ssi->process($shtml);
       $ssi->else();
          $html .= $ssi->include(file => $filename);
       $ssi->endif();

       print $ssi->exec(cgi => $url);
       print $ssi->flastmod(file => $filename);

     #
     # or roll your own favorite flavor of SSI
     #

       package CGI::SSI::MySSI;
       use CGI::SSI;
       @CGI::SSI::MySSI::ISA = qw(CGI::SSI);

       sub include {
          my($self,$type,$file_or_url) = @_; 
          # my idea of include goes something like this...
          return $html;
       }
       1;
       __END__

     #
     # or use .htaccess to include all files in a dir
     #

       # in .htaccess
       Action cgi-ssi /cgi-bin/ssi/process.cgi
       <FilesMatch "\.shtml">
          SetHandler cgi-ssi
       </FilesMatch>
   
       # in /cgi-bin/ssi/process.cgi
       #!/usr/local/bin/perl 
       use CGI::SSI;
       CGI::SSI->handler();
       __END__

DESCRIPTION
    CGI::SSI is meant to be used as an easy way to filter shtml through CGI
    scripts in a loose imitation of Apache's mod_include. If you're using
    Apache, you may want to use either mod_include or the Apache::SSI module
    instead of CGI::SSI. Limitations in a CGI script's knowledge of how the
    server behaves make some SSI directives impossible to imitate from a CGI
    script.

    Most of the time, you'll simply want to filter shtml through STDOUT or
    some other open filehandle. "autotie" is available for STDOUT, but in
    general, you'll want to tie other filehandles yourself:

        $ssi = tie(*FH, 'CGI::SSI', filehandle => 'FH');
        print FH $shtml;

    Note that you'll need to pass the name of the filehandle to "tie()" as a
    named parameter. Other named parameters are possible, as detailed below.
    These parameters are the same as those passed to the "new()" method.
    However, "new()" will not tie a filehandle for you.

    CGI::SSI has it's own flavor of SSI. Test expressions are Perlish. You
    may create and use multiple CGI::SSI objects; they will not step on each
    others' variables.

    Object-Oriented methods use the same general format so as to imitate SSI
    directives:

        <!--#include virtual="/foo/bar.footer" -->

      would be

        $ssi->include(virtual => '/foo/bar.footer');

    likewise,

        <!--#exec cgi="/cgi-bin/foo.cgi" -->

      would be

        $ssi->exec(cgi => '/cgi-bin/foo.cgi');

    Usually, if there's no chance for ambiguity, the first argument may be
    left out:

        <!--#echo var="var_name" -->

      could be either

        $ssi->echo(var => 'var_name');

      or

        $ssi->echo('var_name');

    Likewise,

        $ssi->set(var => $varname, value => $value)

      is the same as 

        $ssi->set($varname => $value)

    $ssi->new([%args])
        Creates a new CGI::SSI object. The following are valid (optional)
        arguments:

         DOCUMENT_URI    => $doc_uri,
         DOCUMENT_NAME   => $doc_name,
         DOCUMENT_ROOT   => $doc_root,
         errmsg          => $oops,
         sizefmt         => ('bytes' || 'abbrev'),
         timefmt         => $time_fmt,
         MAX_RECURSIONS  => $default_100, # when to stop infinite loops w/ error msg
         COOKIE_JAR      => HTTP::Cookies->new,

    $ssi->config($type, $arg)
        $type is either 'sizefmt', 'timefmt', or 'errmsg'. $arg is similar
        to those of the SSI "spec", referenced below.

    $ssi->set($varname => $value)
        Sets variables internal to the CGI::SSI object. (Not to be confused
        with the normal variables your script uses!) These variables may be
        used in test expressions, and retreived using $ssi->echo($varname).
        These variables also will not be available in external, included
        resources.

    $ssi->echo($varname)
        Returns the value of the variable named $varname. Such variables may
        be set manually using the "set()" method. There are also several
        built-in variables:

         DOCUMENT_URI  - the URI of this document
         DOCUMENT_NAME - the name of the current document
         DATE_GMT      - the same as 'gmtime'
         DATE_LOCAL    - the same as 'localtime'
         LAST_MODIFIED - the last time this script was modified

    $ssi->exec($type, $arg)
        $type is either 'cmd' or 'cgi'. $arg is similar to the SSI "spec"
        (see below).

    $ssi->include($type, $arg)
        Similar to "exec", but "virtual" and "file" are the two valid types.
        SSI variables will not be available outside of your CGI::SSI object,
        regardless of whether the virtual resource is on the local system or
        a remote system.

    $ssi->flastmod($type, $filename)
        Similar to "include".

    $ssi->fsize($type, $filename)
        Same as "flastmod".

    $ssi->printenv
        Returns the environment similar to Apache's mod_include.

    $ssi->cookie_jar([$jar])
        Returns the currently-used HTTP::Cookies object. You may optionally
        pass in a new HTTP::Cookies object. The jar is used for web requests
        in exec cgi and include virtual directives.

  FLOW-CONTROL METHODS
    The following methods may be used to test expressions. During a "block"
    where the test $expr is false, nothing will be returned (or printed, if
    tied).

    $ssi->if($expr)
        The expr can be anything Perl, but care should be taken. This causes
        problems:

         $ssi->set(varname => "foo");
         <!--#if expr="'\$varname' =~ /^foo$/" -->ok<!--#endif -->

        The $varname is expanded as you would expect. (We escape it so as to
        use the $varname within the CGI::SSI object, instead of that within
        our progam.) But the $/ inside the regex is also expanded. This is
        fixed by escaping the "$":

         <!--#if expr="'\$varname' =~ /^value\$/" -->ok<!--#endif -->

        The expressions used in if and elif tags/calls are tricky due to the
        number of escapes required. In some cases, you'll need to write
        "\\\\" to mean "\".

    $ssi->elif($expr)
    $ssi->else
    $ssi->endif
SEE ALSO
    "Apache::SSI" and the SSI "spec" at
    http://www.apache.org/docs/mod/mod_include.html

AUTHOR
    (c) 2000-2007 James Tolley <james@bitperfect.com> All Rights Reserved.

    This is free software. You may copy and/or modify it under the same
    terms as perl itself.

CREDITS
    Many Thanks to Corey Wilson for a bug report and fix.