File: INSTALL

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libcurses-perl 1.02-1
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This package requires at least perl5.001, but perl5.002 is highly
recommended, especially for the MakeMaker improvements.  Some of
the MakeMaker stuff mentioned below (PERL_SRC=<...>, etc) may not
work with perl5.001.

[ Addendum: perl5.003 + the security patch is even better, having the
  ExtUtils::testlib module.  You should probably upgrade at least to
  there. ]

When I say "perl5" below, I mean whatever you've called the perl
version 5 executable on your system.  One common mistake is
accidentally using perl version 4.

1) Make sure perl5 has been built.  Unpack "Curses-1.02.tar.gz".

   gunzip -c Curses-1.02.tar.gz | tar xvf -

2) Chdir to the "Curses" directory.

   cd Curses-1.02

3) Want to see if maybe the package can autoconfigure itself?  It's
   pretty dumb about it, but give it a try and skip to (5).

4) Look in the "hints" directory to see if any of the hint files are
   appropriate to your machine's OS.  If so, symlink or copy it to the
   file "c-config.h" in the current ("Curses") directory.  If not,
   copy "hints/c-none.h" to "c-config.h" in the current directory.
   Then edit "c-config.h" and follow the directions.  If you have to
   "roll your own", be sure and save a copy.  A "make clean" will
   delete "c-config.h".  If you "rolled your own", please send me a
   copy so I can include it in future distributions (see
   "hints/c-isc.h" for an example of a user-contributed "c-config.h").

   Edit "Makefile.PL" and pick or add the appropriate options.

5) perl5 Makefile.PL

   This package needs the perl5 header files.  If you've already
   installed perl5, the "Makefile.PL" will magically know where
   they are.  If you haven't installed perl5, you may need to
   tell the "Makefile.PL" where the header files are.  You can
   do this with the "PERL_SRC=<source directory>" option.

   perl5 Makefile.PL PERL_SRC=/local/src/perl5

   If you want to install this package somewhere besides the
   perl5 installation directories, it can get a little complicated.
   The easiest way is to set the "INST_LIB=", "INST_ARCHLIB="
   and "INST_MAN3DIR=" variables to the directories where you want
   things.  You're allowed to use the "~" (tilde) to mean your home
   directory.

   perl5 Makefile.PL INST_LIB=~/lib/perl INST_ARCHLIB=~/lib/perl \
      INST_MAN3DIR=~/man/man3

   The "Makefile.PL", along with just about every other perl module,
   uses the "ExtUtils::MakeMaker" package to generate the "Makefile".
   I highly recommend reading the "ExtUtils::MakeMaker" man page, as
   there are lots of neat options you can specify.

   If the "Makefile.PL" tells you that it can't do something (it
   prints out "I'm sorry" and some more stuff), then you'll need to go
   back to step (4) and try configuring by hand.

6) make

   `make' will first run a perl script called `test.syms' that
   generates the file "pCurses.h".  It should do a pretty good job,
   but if you find that it isn't picking up the correct values, you
   can edit "pCurses.h" by hand and follow the directions.  If you
   have to "roll your own", be sure and save a copy.  A "make clean"
   will delete "pCurses.h".

   `make' will then try to compile "Curses.c".  If you get any
   undefined curses symbols, it means that your curses really doesn't
   have those functions, and you should edit "pCurses.h" and/or
   "c-config.h" and change the #define to #undef for that function.

   If you get other compile errors, it is probably because the curses
   include file and the perl include files are conflicting.  You'll
   have to figure out what's wrong and add proper C code to
   "c-config.h".  See "hints/c-sunos.sysv.h" for an example of how to
   do this.

   One common problem: If the compile of Curses.c fails because of an
   undefined type "chtype", put "#define chtype int" in "c-config.h"
   after the include file (see "hints/c-sunos.bsd.h" for an example).

   Another problem: Depending on the version of ncurses and the
   compiler you use, you might get an error that looks approximately
   like:

      Curses.c: In function `XS_Curses_keyname':
      Curses.c:1531: warning: initialization discards `const' from pointer
      target type

   Ignore it; it's only a warning.  Newer ncurses prototype keyname()
   to returning a const char*, and I didn't feel like going through a
   bunch of pain to both support older compilers and to make the
   warning go away.

7) Optionally test the distribution.  This bit can get a little
   complicated, because things changed between perl5.001, perl5.002,
   and perl5.003.

   If you didn't set the "INST_*" options in step (5), and if you're
   running perl5.001, try:

   perl5 -Iblib demo
   perl5 -Iblib gdc

   If you're running perl5.002, try:

   perl5 -Iblib/arch -Iblib/lib demo
   perl5 -Iblib/arch -Iblib/lib gdc

   If you're running perl5.003 (or later, probably), try:

   perl5 -MExtUtils::testlib demo
   perl5 -MExtUtils::testlib gdc

   If you did set the "INST_*" options, hopefully you've put that
   directory in your "PERL5LIB" environment variable.  If not, do. :-)

   perl5 demo
   perl5 gdc

   "gdc" is a digital clock ported from the "ncurses" distribution.

   As mentioned in the "README", the demo is not intended to be an
   exhaustive test of all the possible Curses functions.  If it
   doesn't do all the functions correctly, it may be a Curses bug or
   it may be a problem with your system's "libcurses.a".  There's no
   getting around the fact that you need to be conversant in how your
   system's "libcurses.a" works to be able to use Curses most
   effectively.

   For "demo", you can try:

   make cdemo

   This will try to compile a pure-C version of the "demo".  If you
   see the same errors in it that you see in "demo", it means there's
   a bug in your libcurses.
   
8) Doing a :

   make install

   will install everything in the "standard" perl5 places, just like
   stuff from the base perl5 distribution.  If you set the "INST_*"
   options to where you want Curses to reside, you can skip this step.

9) Enjoy!

   If your enjoyment is ruined (:-) because the module doesn't work
   right, peruse the Curses pod document (located at the end of
   "Curses.pm") for incompatibilities with other Perl programs.  Also
   check the end of the "README" for problems that may exist for your
   particular libcurses.a or operating system.