File: RELEASE_NOTES

package info (click to toggle)
libdata-formvalidator-perl 4.70-1
  • links: PTS, VCS
  • area: main
  • in suites: wheezy
  • size: 676 kB
  • sloc: perl: 2,839; makefile: 2
file content (126 lines) | stat: -rw-r--r-- 4,126 bytes parent folder | download | duplicates (7)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126

The 4.0 release addresses several lingering concerns I've had with the
interface but didn't now how to address until now. Here's a summary of
the parts of the interface that now have updated alternatives. The old
syntax will still work. 

* Using 'validator_packages' re-invents module loading and importing. 
  'constraint_methods' can be loaded normally:
    use My::Constraints qw(my_constraint);

* Custom constraint_methods don't need to be named "valid_" or "match_".

* Passing parameters to constraints was awkward. It looked like this:

  my_field => {
 		constraint => 'my_constraint',
		params => [\'string',\'bling'],
  }

  constraint_methods allows normal looking parameter passing:

  my_field => FV_length_between(10,20);

* Using a 'constraint_method' as a hash was awkward, because you had  
  to use a hashref to pass it in:

  constraints =>
	  my_date_field => {
			constraint_method => 'date_and_time'
	  }
  }

  Now these kinds of constraints can be used with less effort with the
  'constraint_methods' profile key:

  constraint_methods => {
	 my_date_field => 'date_and_time',
  }
  
  All of the built-in constraints have been updated to support this alternate
  interface in which constraint subroutines actually look and work like normal
  subroutines. 

  Where there is no need to convert old code, here is an example difference of
  using a built-in constraint with the new syntax:

  BEFORE:
  
   constraints => {
   	my_email => 'email',
   }
  
  AFTER:
  
   constraint_methods => {
  	my_email => email(), 
   }
  
  As well, the Regexp::Common support has been improved so that you can
  call these routines through the normal subroutine interface provided,
  and DFV will keep track of the name of the constraint for later use
  in the 'msgs' error message system. 
  
  BEFORE: 
  
    constraints => {
        my_ip => {
                constraint => 'RE_net_IPv4',
                params => [ \'-sep'=> \' ' ],
        },
    }
  
  AFTER: 
  
    constraint_methods => {
        my_ip =>  FV_net_IPv4Z('-sep'=> ' ');
    }

  The 'filter' code has not yet been updated. It has been less of an issue
  since I've never seen a filter that took parameters. If someone wants to work
  on this update, feel free.

* Writing your own constraints is easier. This is where the secret lies for
  making all of these improvements possible.

  Here are the fundamental problems that had to be solved: When declaring a
  constraint, you are really declaring a function that needs to be called, but
  you can't actually call the function then, because you don't have the value
  to validate yet, or the DFV object, or the other data which you might want to
  refer to. However, you might have /some/ parameters you want to provide, such
  as minimum and maximum value on a coolness() constraint you've written.

  The solution? Closures. This is the concept that took me years to understand
  the value of. The subroutine called in the profile will take the parameters
  that you know at that time. It then returns a customized anonymous subroutine.
  When this is called, it will have everything that's needed to complete job.
  Let's look at an example.

  sub coolness {
 	my ($min_cool,$max_cool) = @_; 
	return sub {
		my $dfv = shift;

		# Name it to refer to in the 'msgs' system.
		$dfv->name_this('coolness');

		my $val = $dfv->get_current_constraint_value();

		return ( ($val >= $min_cool) && ($val <= $max_cool) );
	}
  }

  Getting this far leaves one wrinkle left to work out. How can we refer to values of other 
  fields that have been submitted? 

  This is partly solved by the C<$dfv->get_input_data()> method that lets you get at the hash
  of input data from within the constraint method. 

  The following is recommended (but not required) for refering to other fields. 
  I suggest making the final parameter a hashref that names a 'fields' arrayref.
  Like this:

   coolness(1,10,{fields => [qw/personality smarts good_looks/]});

  This would indicate that you are going to use the values of these three
  fields as factors in your C<coolness()> constraint method.