File: README

package info (click to toggle)
libjira-client-automated-perl 1.90-1
  • links: PTS, VCS
  • area: main
  • in suites: bullseye, sid
  • size: 208 kB
  • sloc: perl: 1,428; makefile: 2
file content (590 lines) | stat: -rw-r--r-- 20,371 bytes parent folder | download
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
232
233
234
235
236
237
238
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
256
257
258
259
260
261
262
263
264
265
266
267
268
269
270
271
272
273
274
275
276
277
278
279
280
281
282
283
284
285
286
287
288
289
290
291
292
293
294
295
296
297
298
299
300
301
302
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
310
311
312
313
314
315
316
317
318
319
320
321
322
323
324
325
326
327
328
329
330
331
332
333
334
335
336
337
338
339
340
341
342
343
344
345
346
347
348
349
350
351
352
353
354
355
356
357
358
359
360
361
362
363
364
365
366
367
368
369
370
371
372
373
374
375
376
377
378
379
380
381
382
383
384
385
386
387
388
389
390
391
392
393
394
395
396
397
398
399
400
401
402
403
404
405
406
407
408
409
410
411
412
413
414
415
416
417
418
419
420
421
422
423
424
425
426
427
428
429
430
431
432
433
434
435
436
437
438
439
440
441
442
443
444
445
446
447
448
449
450
451
452
453
454
455
456
457
458
459
460
461
462
463
464
465
466
467
468
469
470
471
472
473
474
475
476
477
478
479
480
481
482
483
484
485
486
487
488
489
490
491
492
493
494
495
496
497
498
499
500
501
502
503
504
505
506
507
508
509
510
511
512
513
514
515
516
517
518
519
520
521
522
523
524
525
526
527
528
529
530
531
532
533
534
535
536
537
538
539
540
541
542
543
544
545
546
547
548
549
550
551
552
553
554
555
556
557
558
559
560
561
562
563
564
565
566
567
568
569
570
571
572
573
574
575
576
577
578
579
580
581
582
583
584
585
586
587
588
589
590
NAME

    JIRA::Client::Automated - A JIRA REST Client for automated scripts

VERSION

    version 1.9

SYNOPSIS

        use JIRA::Client::Automated;
    
        my $jira = JIRA::Client::Automated->new($url, $user, $password);
    
        # If your JIRA instance does not use username/password for authorization
        my $jira = JIRA::Client::Automated->new($url);
    
        my $jira_ua = $jira->ua(); # to add in a proxy
    
        $jira->trace(1); # enable tracing of requests and responses
    
        # The simplest way to create an issue
        my $issue = $jira->create_issue($project, $type, $summary, $description);
    
        # The simplest way to create a subtask
        my $subtask = $jira->create_subtask($project, $summary, $description, $parent_key);
    
        # A complex but flexible way to create a new issue, story, task or subtask
        # if you know Jira issue hash structure well.
        my $issue = $jira->create({
            # Jira issue 'fields' hash
            project     => {
                key => $project,
            },
            issuetype   => {
                name => $type,      # "Bug", "Task", "Sub-task", etc.
            },
            summary     => $summary,
            description => $description,
            parent      => {        # only required for a subtask
                key => $parent_key,
            },
            ...
        });
    
    
        my $search_results = $jira->search_issues($jql, 1, 100); # query should be a single string of JQL
        my @issues = $jira->all_search_results($jql, 1000); # query should be a single string of JQL
    
        my $issue = $jira->get_issue($key);
    
        $jira->update_issue($key, $update_hash); # update_hash is { field => value, ... }
        $jira->create_comment($key, $text);
        $jira->attach_file_to_issue($key, $filename);
    
        $jira->transition_issue($key, $transition, $transition_hash); # transition_hash is { field => value, ... }
    
        $jira->close_issue($key, $resolve, $comment); # resolve is the resolution value
        $jira->delete_issue($key);
    
        $jira->add_issue_watchers($key, $watcher1, ......);
        $jira->add_issue_labels($key, $label1, ......);

DESCRIPTION

    JIRA::Client::Automated is an adapter between any automated system and
    JIRA's REST API. This module is explicitly designed to easily create
    and close issues within a JIRA instance via automated scripts.

    For example, if you run nightly batch jobs, you can use
    JIRA::Client::Automated to have those jobs automatically create issues
    in JIRA for you when the script runs into errors. You can attach error
    log files to the issues and then they'll be waiting in someone's open
    issues list when they arrive at work the next day.

    If you want to avoid creating the same issue more than once you can
    search JIRA for it first, only creating it if it doesn't exist. If it
    does already exist you can add a comment or a new error log to that
    issue.

WORKING WITH JIRA 6 Atlassian has made a very complete REST API for recent
(> 5.0) versions of JIRA. By virtue of being complete it is also somewhat
large and a little complex for the beginner. Reading their tutorials is
*highly* recommended before you start making hashes to update or transition
issues.

    https://developer.atlassian.com/cloud/jira/platform/rest/#about

    This module was designed for the JIRA 5.2.11 REST API, as of March
    2013, but it works fine with JIRA 6.0 as well. Your mileage may vary
    with future versions.

JIRA ISSUE HASH FORMAT

    When you work with an issue in JIRA's REST API, it gives you a JSON
    file that follows this spec:

    https://developer.atlassian.com/cloud/jira/platform/rest/#api-api-2-issue-post

    JIRA::Client::Automated tries to be nice to you and not make you deal
    directly with JSON. When you create a new issue, you can pass in just
    the pieces you want and "create_issue" will transform them to JSON for
    you. The same for closing and deleting issues.

    Updating and transitioning issues is more complex. Each JIRA
    installation will have different fields available for each issue type
    and transition screen and only you will know what they are. So in those
    cases you'll need to pass in an "update_hash" which will be transformed
    to the proper JSON by the method.

    An update_hash looks like this:

        { field1 => value, field2 => value2, ...}

    For example:

        {
            host_id => "example.com",
            { resolution => { name => "Resolved" } }
        }

    If you do not read JIRA's documentation about their JSON format you
    will hurt yourself banging your head against your desk in frustration
    the first few times you try to use "update_issue". Please RTFM.

    Note that even though JIRA requires JSON, JIRA::Client::Automated will
    helpfully translate it to and from regular hashes for you. You only
    pass hashes to JIRA::Client::Automated, not direct JSON.

    I recommend connecting to your JIRA server and calling "get_issue" with
    a key you know exists and then dump the result. That'll get you
    started.

METHODS

 new

        my $jira = JIRA::Client::Automated->new($url, $user, $password);

    Create a new JIRA::Client::Automated object by passing in the
    following:

      1. URL for the JIRA server, such as "http://example.atlassian.net/"

      2. Username to use to login to the JIRA server

      3. Password for that user

    All three parameters are required if your JIRA instance uses basic
    authorization, for which JIRA::Client::Automated must connect to the
    JIRA instance using some username and password. You may want to set up
    a special "auto" or "batch" username to use just for use by scripts.

    If you are using Google Account integration, the username and password
    to use are the ones you set up at the very beginning of the
    registration process and then never used again because Google logged
    you in.

    If you have other ways of authorization, like GSSAPI based
    authorization, do not provide username or password.

        my $jira = JIRA::Client::Automated->new($url);

 ua

        my $ua = $jira->ua();

    Returns the LWP::UserAgent object used to connect to the JIRA instance.
    Typically used to setup proxies or make other customizations to the
    UserAgent. For example:

        my $ua = $jira->ua();
        $ua->env_proxy();
        $ua->ssl_opts(...);
        $ua->conn_cache( LWP::ConnCache->new() );

 trace

        $jira->trace(1);       # enable
        $jira->trace(0);       # disable
        $trace = $jira->trace;

    When tracing is enabled each request and response is logged using carp.

 create

        my $issue = $jira->create({
            # Jira issue 'fields' hash
            project     => {
                key => $project,
            },
            issuetype   => {
                name => $type,      # "Bug", "Task", "SubTask", etc.
            },
            summary     => $summary,
            description => $description,
            parent      => {        # only required for a subtask
                key => $parent_key,
            },
            ...
        });

    Creating a new issue, story, task, subtask, etc.

    Returns a hash containing only the basic information about the new
    issue, or dies if there is an error. The hash looks like:

        {
            id => 24066,
            key => "TEST-57",
            self => "https://example.atlassian.net/rest/api/latest/issue/24066"
        }

    See also
    https://developer.atlassian.com/cloud/jira/platform/rest/#api-api-2-issue-post

 create_issue

        my $issue = $jira->create_issue($project, $type, $summary, $description, $fields);

    Creating a new issue requires the project key, type ("Bug", "Task",
    etc.), and a summary and description.

    The optional $fields parameter can be used to pass a reference to a
    hash of extra fields to be set when the issue is created, which avoids
    the need for a separate "update_issue" call. For example:

        $jira->create_issue($project, $type, $summary, $description, {
            labels => [ "foo", "bar" ]
        });

    This method calls "create" and return the same hash reference that it
    does.

 create_subtask

        my $subtask = $jira->create_subtask($project, $summary, $description, $parent_key);
        # or with optional subtask type
        my $subtask = $jira->create_subtask($project, $summary, $description, $parent_key, 'sub-task');

    Creating a subtask. If your JIRA instance does not call subtasks
    "Sub-task" or "sub-task", then you will need to pass in your subtask
    type.

    This method calls "create" and return the same hash reference that it
    does.

 update_issue

        $jira->update_issue($key, $field_update_hash, $update_verb_hash);

    There are two ways to express the updates you want to make to an issue.

    For simple changes you pass $field_update_hash as a reference to a hash
    of field_name => new_value pairs. For example:

        $jira->update_issue($key, { summary => $new_summary });

    That works for simple fields, but there are some, like comments, that
    can't be updated in this way. For them you need to use
    $update_verb_hash.

    The $update_verb_hash parameter allow you to express a series of
    specific operations (verbs) to be performed on each field. For example:

        $jira->update_issue($key, undef, {
            labels   => [ { remove => "test" }, { add => "another" } ],
            comments => [ { remove => { id => 10001 } } ]
        });

    The two forms of update can be combined in a single call.

    For more information see:

        L<https://developer.atlassian.com/cloud/jira/platform/rest/#api-api-2-issue-issueIdOrKey-put>

 get_issue

        my $issue = $jira->get_issue($key);

    Returns details for any issue, given its key. This call returns a hash
    containing the information for the issue in JIRA's format. See "JIRA
    ISSUE HASH FORMAT" for details.

 transition_issue

        $jira->transition_issue($key, $transition);
        $jira->transition_issue($key, $transition, $update_hash);

    Transitioning an issue is what happens when you click the button that
    says "Resolve Issue" or "Start Progress" on it. Doing this from code is
    harder, but JIRA::Client::Automated makes it as easy as possible.

    You pass this method the issue key, the name of the transition or the
    target status (spacing and capitalization matter), and an optional
    update_hash containing any fields that you want to update.

  Specifying The Transition

    The provided $transition name is first matched against the available
    transitions for the $key issue ('Start Progress', 'Close Issue'). If
    there's no match then the names is matched against the available target
    status names ('Open', 'Closed'). You can use whichever is most
    appropriate. For example, in your configuration the transition names
    might vary between different kinds of projects but the status names
    might be the same. In which case scripts that are meant to work across
    multiple projects might prefer to use the status names.

    The $transition parameter can also be specified as a reference to an
    array of names. In this case the first one that matches either a
    transition name or status name is used. This makes it easier for
    scripts to work across multiple kinds of projects and/or handle the
    migration of names by allowing current and future names to be used, so
    the later change in JIRA config doesn't cause any breakage.

  Specifying Updates

    If you have required fields on the transition screen (such as
    "Resolution" for the "Resolve Issue" screen), you must pass those
    fields in as part of the update_hash or you will get an error from the
    server. See "JIRA ISSUE HASH FORMAT" for the format of the update_hash.

    (Note: it appears that in some obscure cases missing required fields
    may cause the transition to fail without causing an error from the
    server. For example a field that's required but isn't configured to
    appear on the transition screen.)

    The $update_hash is a combination of the $field_update_hash and
    $update_verb_hash parameters used by the "update_issue" method. Like
    this:

        $update_hash = {
            fields => $field_update_hash,
            update => $update_verb_hash
        };

    You can use it to express both simple field settings and more complex
    update operations. For example:

        $jira->transition_issue($key, $transition, {
            fields => { summary => $new_summary },
            update => {
                labels   => [ { remove => "test" }, { add => "another" } ],
                comments => [ { remove => { id => 10001 } } ]
            }
        });

 close_issue

        $jira->close_issue($key);
        $jira->close_issue($key, $resolve);
        $jira->close_issue($key, $resolve, $comment);
        $jira->close_issue($key, $resolve, $comment, $update_hash);
        $jira->close_issue($key, $resolve, $comment, $update_hash, $operation);

    Pass in the resolution reason and an optional comment to close an
    issue. Using this method requires that the issue is is a status where
    it can use the "Close Issue" transition (or other one, specified by
    $operation). If not, you will get an error from the server.

    Resolution ("Fixed", "Won't Fix", etc.) is only required if the issue
    hasn't already been resolved in an earlier transition. If you try to
    resolve an issue twice, you will get an error.

    If you do not supply a comment, the default value is "Issue closed by
    script".

    The $update_hash can be used to set or edit the values of other fields.

    The $operation parameter can be used to specify the closing transition
    type. This can be useful when your JIRA configuration uses nonstandard
    or localized transition and status names, e.g.

            use utf8;
            $jira->close_issue($key, $resolve, $comment, $update_hash, "Done");

    See "transition_issue" for more details.

    This method is a wrapper for "transition_issue".

 delete_issue

        $jira->delete_issue($key);

    Deleting issues is for testing your JIRA code. In real situations you
    almost always want to close unwanted issues with an "Oops!" resolution
    instead.

 create_comment

        $jira->create_comment($key, $text);

    You may use any valid JIRA markup in comment text. (This is handy for
    tables of values explaining why something in the database is wrong.)
    Note that comments are all created by the user you used to create your
    JIRA::Client::Automated object, so you'll see that name often.

 search_issues

        my @search_results = $jira->search_issues($jql, 1, 100, $fields);

    You've used JQL before, when you did an "Advanced Search" in the JIRA
    web interface. That's the only way to search via the REST API.

    This is a paged method. Pass in the starting result number and number
    of results per page and it will return issues a page at a time. If you
    know you want all of the results, you can use "all_search_results"
    instead.

    Optional parameter $fields is the arrayref containing the list of
    fields to be returned.

    This method returns a hashref containing up to five values:

      1. total => total number of results

      2. start => result number for the first result

      3. max => maximum number of results per page

      4. issues => an arrayref containing the actual found issues

      5. errors => an arrayref containing error messages

    For example, to page through all results $max at a time:

        my (@all_results, @issues);
        do {
            $results = $self->search_issues($jql, $start, $max);
            if ($results->{errors}) {
                die join "\n", @{$results->{errors}};
            }
            @issues = @{$results->{issues}};
            push @all_results, @issues;
            $start += $max;
        } until (scalar(@issues) < $max);

    (Or just use "all_search_results" instead.)

 all_search_results

        my @issues = $jira->all_search_results($jql, 1000);

    Like "search_issues", but returns all the results as an array of
    issues. You can specify the maximum number to return, but no matter
    what, it can't return more than the value of
    jira.search.views.default.max for your JIRA installation.

 get_issue_comments

        $jira->get_issue_comments($key);

    Returns arryref of all comments to the given issue.

 attach_file_to_issue

        $jira->attach_file_to_issue($key, $filename);

    This method does not let you attach a comment to the issue at the same
    time. You'll need to call "create_comment" for that.

    Watch out for file permissions! If the user running the script does not
    have permission to read the file it is trying to upload, you'll get
    weird errors.

 make_browse_url

        my $url = $jira->make_browse_url($key);

    A helper method to return the ".../browse/$key" url for the issue. It's
    handy to make emails containing lists of bugs easier to create.

    This just appends the key to the URL for the JIRA server so that you
    can click on it and go directly to that issue.

 get_link_types

        my $all_link_types = $jira->get_link_types();

    Get the arrayref of all possible link types.

 link_issues

        $jira->link_issues($from, $to, $type);

    Establish a link of the type named $type from issue key $from to issue
    key $to . Returns nothing on success; structure containing error
    messages otherwise.

 add_issue_labels

        $jira->add_issue_labels($issue_key, @labels);

    Adds one more more labels to the specified issue.

 remove_issue_labels

        $jira->remove_issue_labels($issue_key, @labels);

    Removes one more more labels from the specified issue.

 add_issue_watchers

        $jira->add_issue_watchers($key, @watchers);

    Adds watchers to the specified issue. Returns nothing if success;
    otherwise returns a structure containing error message.

 get_issue_watchers

        $jira->get_issue_watchers($key);

    Returns arryref of all watchers of the given issue.

 assign_issue

        $jira->assign_issue($key, $assignee_name);

    Assigns the issue to that person. Returns the key of the issue if it
    succeeds.

 add_issue_worklog

        $jira->add_issue_worklog($key, $worklog);

    Adds a worklog to the specified issue. Returns nothing if success;
    otherwise returns a structure containing error message.

    Sample worklog: { "comment" => "I did some work here.", "started" =>
    "2016-05-27T02:32:26.797+0000", "timeSpentSeconds" => 12000, }

 get_issue_worklogs

        $jira->get_issue_worklogs($key);

    Returns arryref of all worklogs of the given issue.

FAQ

 Why is there no object for a JIRA issue?

    Because it seemed silly. You could write such an object and give it
    methods to transition itself, close itself, etc., but when you are
    working with JIRA from batch scripts, you're never really working with
    just one issue at a time. And when you have a hundred of them, it's
    easier to not objectify them and just use JIRA::Client::Automated as a
    mediator. That said, if this is important to you, I wouldn't say no to
    a patch offering this option.

BUGS

    Please report bugs or feature requests to the author.

AUTHOR

    Michael Friedman <frimicc@cpan.org>

CREDITS

    Thanks very much to:

    Tim Bunce <timb@cpan.org>

    Dominique Dumont <ddumont@cpan.org>

    Zhuang (John) Li <7humblerocks@gmail.com>

    Ivan E. Panchenko <panchenko@cpan.org>

    José Antonio Perez Testa <japtesta@gmail.com>

    Frank Schophuizen <Frank.Schophuizen@philips.com>

    Zhenyi Zhou <zhenyz@cpan.org>

    Roy Lyons <Roy.Lyons@cmegroup.com>

    Neil Hemingway <hemingway@cpan.org>

    Andreas Mager <amager@barracuda.com>

    Mike Svendsen <msven.dev@gmail.com>

COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE

    This software is copyright (c) 2016 by Polyvore, Inc.

    This is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under
    the same terms as the Perl 5 programming language system itself.