File: HACKING.DKIM

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Here is a list of components of Mail::DKIM, and the parts of the DKIM spec.
they implement:

http://mipassoc.org/dkim/specs/draft-allman-dkim-base-01.txt

  Canonicalization/DkimCommon.pm -- 5.4
  Canonicalization/simple.pm     -- 3.4.1 and 3.4.3
  Canonicalization/relaxed.pm    -- 3.4.2 and 3.4.4


http://mipassoc.org/mass/specs/draft-allman-dkim-base-00-10dc.html

  Algorithm/rsa_sha1.pm      -- 3.3.1
  Canonicalization/nowsp.pm  -- 3.4.2
  Signature.pm               -- 3.5
  Signer.pm                  -- 5
  Verifier.pm                -- 6

--

New version - update version numbers in these files:
  lib/Mail/DKIM.pm
  lib/Mail/DKIM/Verifier.pm
  lib/Mail/DKIM/Signer.pm
  lib/Mail/DKIM/Common.pm
  README

--

New algorithm:
  create new algorithm class by copying and editing
    lib/Mail/DKIM/Algorithm/rsa_sha1.pm
  edit lib/Mail/DKIM/Common.pm:
    get_algorithm_class() - add a check for your new algorithm and return
      the name of your new algorithm class
    add a "use" line at the top of this file so that your algorithm class
      gets imported

--

How the Verifier Works:

First, the message headers are fed into the verifier object, where they
are stored into a buffer until all headers have been seen.

  message +----------+
  ------> | Verifier |
          +----------+

When the blank line separating the header from the body has been seen,
the verifier looks at the headers, picking out and parsing each DKIM
and DomainKey signature for verification. The signature specifies which
algorithm and canonicalization method the verifier should use. The
verifier creates an "algorithm object" corresponding to each signature.
Each algorithm object will perform the verification for one signature.

Now the verifier feeds the message headers from its buffer into each
newly-constructed algorithm object, which in turn feeds the headers into
the header canonicalizer, which canonicalizes the headers and feeds the
result into a Digest object, which will compute the SHA-1 or SHA-256
digest.

  +----------+         +-----------+     +---------+   can.  +--------+
  | Verifier | headers | Algorithm |     | Canoni- | headers | Header |
  |          | ------> |           | --> | calizer | ------> | Digest |
  +----------+         +-----------+     +---------+         +--------+

Now the verifier accepts the rest of the message (i.e. the body). The
body is not buffered in memory; it gets piped through the algorithm,
the body canonicalizer, and into the body digest.

  message +----------+   +-----------+   +---------+ can. +--------+
  body    | Verifier |   | Algorithm |   | Canoni- | body |  Body  |
  ------> |          | > |           | > | calizer | ---> | Digest |
          +----------+   +-----------+   +---------+      +--------+

Now the whole message has been read.

The DKIM signature, minus the contents of the b= tag, is fed into the
header canonicalizer, which gets fed into the header digest.

            modified DKIM +---------+  can.  +--------+
              signature   | Canoni- | header | Header |
            ------------> | calizer | -----> | Digest |
                          +---------+        +--------+

The header digest is computed, and the algorithm verifies it against
the value of the b= tag in the signature. If it fails to match, the
signature has "failed".

Next, the body digest is computed, and compared with that in the
signature. If it fails to match, the signature has "failed".

Otherwise, the signature has "passed".

--

Asynchronous DNS lookups

In the dkimproxy case, as the message is received it is being "fed"
into the DKIM verifier. The DKIM verifier can emit the DNS queries
as soon as the header is read and parsed. Each signature is assumed
to have a valid public key. When the entire message is finished,
the DKIM verifier will wait for any DNS queries that haven't finished,
then verify the signatures.

In the SpamAssassin case, the message is already in memory.
SpamAssassin will want to create the DKIM verifier and give it the
message header early so that the DNS queries can be emitted. Then
when the DNS responses are received, it can come back and give the
verifier the rest of the message.

Considering this, it might be useful to provide a slightly different
API for SpamAssassin. One that explicitly specifies the header
boundaries (when it expects DNS queries to be emitted), and the
end of message (when the DNS responses are ready, or it's ok to block
until they are). E.g.

  $dkim = Verifier->new(Resolver => $my_custom_resolver);
  $dkim->process_header($entire_header);
  $dkim->process_body($entire_message_body);
  $my_custom_resolver->wait_for_responses();
  $dkim->do_verification();
  my $result = $dkim->result;