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lifelines 3.0.50-2
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LifeLines Source Release, Version 3.0.50
http://lifelines.sourceforge.net
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

********************************
Contents:
1. General (UNIX) installation
 1a) Dependencies
2. Platform specific notes
 2a) Platforms supported out-of-the-box
 2b) Microsoft Windows
 2c) cygwin
 2d) rpm packages
 2e) Debian binaries
 2f) gcc 2.7.2.1
 2g) curses
 2h) Mac OS X
********************************



******************************
1. General (UNIX) installation
******************************


This is the source distribution of the LifeLines system, a genealogy
software system.

(If you are building from cvs sources, you will not have a configure
script, and you should be reading the README.DEVELOPERS instructions.)

LifeLines should compile correctly using GNU gcc or any native C compiler.
It also will build using the Cygnus tools on Windows (but see note in the
platform notes section below).

To build and install LifeLines, do the following:

	./configure (if that does't work, try 'sh ./configure')
	make
	make install

If you do not have gettext & iconv installed, you may need to use
	./configure --disable-nls

This will generate Makefiles suitable for your platform and then build
and install the LifeLines programs.  You will end up with the following
executables (installed in various places, depending on your platform):

llines   -- main LifeLines system program
btedit   -- general purpose btree edit program
dbverify -- checks a LifeLines database for problems

llines is the main LifeLines program.

dverify can be used to verify the correctness of a LifeLines database.
This is handy if you're storing databases on floppies, or just for
peace of mind.

btedit is a administration tool used for unmangling mangled databases, 
and is extremely powerful.  You should only use this program under the
expert guidance of a LifeLines developer.


docs:
The make process will attempt to generate html, pdf, and text 
documentation from the xml source files. If the jw tools are
not found, errors will display, but the make will continue. 
Pregenerated versions of the documentation are included, in
html, pdf, and text formats, so it is not necessary to have
these tools installed. It is simply beneficial to ensure that
they are absolutely up-to-date.

******************************
1a) Dependencies
******************************
lifelines has a number of dependencies and they vary depending on
how you build lifelines. (Avoid gcc version 2.7.2.1)
1. General dependencies
   ncurses
2. Building from CVS
   automake
   autoconf
   bison
3. Document Generation - see above about docs.
   Regeneration of the docs requires tools to convert from xml to html, pdf,
   and text.  Currently the tools being used are 
   docbook
   docbook-utils
   lynx
4. Multiple Language support - processed files are checked into cvs, but
   to rebuild the language files:
   gettext
   iconv

Some notes on our document generation.  The makefiles currently are setup to 
use the  "docbook-utils" package -- part of the "docbook-tools" package at RedHat.
More tools are becoming available to convert xml to html and/or pdf formats.
On FreeBSD systems it is possible to use Xerces and Xalan -- a XML parser 
and XSLT transformer, respectively, from the Apache XML project:
http://xml.apache.org/
    $ xalan -o ll-userguide.html ll-userguide.xml .../docbook-xsl/html/docbook.xsl
    $ htmldoc -f ll-userguide.pdf ll-userguide.html
DarwinPorts has xercesc, xalanc, docbook-xml, and docbook-xsl.

**************************
2. Platform specific notes
**************************

*********************
2a) Platforms supported out-of-the-box
*********************

Many unix systems should be supported out-of-the-box with the tarball
(lifelines-x.y.z.tar.gz) distribution.

Reported successes include:
 lifelines-3.0.46:
   Fedora Core 3
   FreeBSD 4.11-STABLE
   OS X 10.3.9
 

*********************
2b) Microsoft Windows
*********************

For installing the binary distribution on MS-Windows, refer to the
file Install.LifeLines.Windows.txt included in that distribution
(& also included in the docs subdirectory of the source
distributions).

For compiling from source on MS-Windows, if using cygwin, refer to
the General (UNIX) instruction above (and see also the cygwin note
below). If using MS Visual C++, you may use the project files
included in the subdirectories beneath /win32/msvc6 (which are
currently used by Perry to generate the binaries in the MS-Windows
binary distribution).


**********
2c) Cygwin
**********

Cygwin is a UNIX environment for MS-Windows. 
    http://sources.redhat.com/cygwin
The lines around the boxes in the lifelines curses GUI use OEM
box characters, and so only display correctly with this setting:
    export CYGWIN=codepage:oem
This of course affects the console code page. If all your data is
ASCII, this solution may work fine for you. Otherwise, you may
invoke llines with the -z switch to suppress curses graphics, and
use primitive ASCII graphics. This is not particularly attractive,
but is usable. Suggestions are welcome.
Note that the -z commandline switch was added after the 3.0.9 
release.

To compile libiconv on cygwin, I had to compile it statically, eg,
(in libiconv directory)
   ./configure --enable-static --disable-shared


***************
2d) rpm packages
***************

The source distribution includes the spec file to create rpm
packages.

***************
2e) Debian packages
***************

Christian Perrier maintains a Debian port of linux.
See:
http://packages.debian.org/cgi-bin/search_packages.pl?searchon=names&version=all&exact=1&keywords=lifelines


***************
2f) gcc 2.7.2.1
***************

gcc 2.7.2.1 does not understand -Wreturn-type, so this
must be removed from configure and from CFLAGS in
interp/Makefile* files. This must be done before configuring,
because it causes configure tests to fail spuriously.
(Jan, 2002)


**********
2g) curses
**********

Compiling with curses (lacking ncurses) on a BSDI 3.1 box,
I had to add
    -ltermcap
to the LIBS line in liflines/Makefile. (The symptom was
"unknown symbol... _tputs.)
However, I wound up core dumping at run-time, so I don't know
what is going on. 
(Perry, Jan, 2002)


************
2h) Mac OS X
************

Please see the following page about LifeLines on Mac OS X:
    http://homepage.mac.com/shrubbery/LifeLines
(which is also available via the Apple downloads site and Stepwise.)
This page offers both precompiled binaries and instructions for
compilation.
NB: Because the gnu tests for platform didn't recognize Darwin,
on older versions, perhaps before 10.2.x, it was necessary to pass
an argument to configure, eg,
   ./configure ppc
There is no specific code needed for Darwin; this is just to avoid
the macros getting angry at the unknown output from "uname -a".