File: CUSTOMIZE

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Customization Guide for Lpe

This file describes where to start in customizing lpe to fit your own
preferences.  As of version 1.2.4, lpe reads a configuration file that can be
used to customize its behavior.  I will be adding more options to this config
file as time goes on, and that will be most of what this document describes.
If you are using a version prior to 1.2.4-mhp-2, you'll need to check out the
CUSTOMIZE file from that distribution, as this information will not apply.

The configuration files are SLang scripts, however, you don't have to know
SLang to be able to configure lpe. This documentation will show you the basic
things that can get you started.

The main configuration file is located at $sysconfdir/lperc, depending on
how you configured lpe this can be anything. Most common configurations will
probably be the following:
	/usr/local/etc/lperc
	/usr/etc/lperc
	/etc/lperc

A per-user configuration file exists too, it is located in
	~/.lpe/custom

Before modifying the main file, it is a good idea to test the modifications in
the per-user configuratio file, so you won't break anything.

Lpe does NOT stop at the first file.  Instead, it reads all files present, and
values in later files override values from prior files.  This means that you
can use the .lpe/custom file from your home directory to override site-wide
defaults in /etc/lperc, or compiled-in application defaults. The application
defaults are only used if none of the configuration files can be found.

As I said before, the configuration files are SLang scripts, therefore you
can place SLang function calls into them and whatever SLang allows. For
beginners, the lpe_set_mode_option function will be the most useful. Currently,
this is the only function that affects lpe directly. Its syntax is the
following:

	lpe_set_option ( <option id>, <value> );

The <option id> argument consists of three parts: the mode's name, the
section name, and the option id itself. These parts are separated by dots.
So for example, if you want to turn off highlighting in all modes, you'd place
the following line to your ~/.lpe/custom file:

	lpe_set_option ( "global.general.highlight", 0 );

Note that the "global" name for a mode means that it is global, and affects
all modes. However, you can override it. So if you want to reenable syntax
highlightin for the 'C' mode, you'd place the following line to your 
~/.lpe/custom file too:

	lpe_set_option ( "cmode.general.highlight", 1 );

At this time, only three sections exist: general, color and background.

The general section contains the following options:

offerhelp - Print a message on the status bar explaining how to get help.  This
is sometimes useful for people not familiar with the keys.  A non-zero value
will display the message, and a 0 value will not.  The default is 1 for all
modes.

hardtab - The TAB key inserts actual tab characters, versus inserting spaces to
the next tabstop position.  A non-zero values uses TABS, and a zero values uses
spaces.  The default is 1 for all modes.

autoindent - When the Enter key is pressed, insert whitespace at the beginning
of the new line to match the indent from the previous line.  Non-zero turns it
on.  In general, programming modes have a default of on, whereas most other
modes turn this off by default.

flashbrace - This option only has an effect for modes that support brace
flashing.  Flash the cursor back to an opening brace when a closing one is
typed.  This can be useful for tracking nesting.  The default is on (non-zero)
for all modes where brace flashing is supported.

highlight - This option only has an effect for modes that support syntax
highlighting.  Color the text according to its meaning as defined by the mode.
The default is on (non-zero) for all modes that support it.

The color and background sections are mode dependent, please look at
the sources for what options are available for a specific mode. Later,
a few examples will be included here.

Things that can't be set from the configuration file:

-- Translating messages for localization --------------------------------------

Lpe uses GNU gettext, so translations happen in a manner analogous to other
gettext projects.  See the file ABOUT-NLS for more information.  Notice that
some messages come from the system itself, via the strerror() function call.
I expect that these would already appear in your desired language.  If they do
not, however, you should see about getting a localized version of libc, as
there is nothing that lpe can reasonably do about this situation.

Man pages can be translated and stored in a file called lpe.1.xx, where xx is
the ISO two-letter language code for your language.  (Please use the language
code, not the country code, as they do often differ.  I already have this
problem with the Czech translation, and I'd prefer not to duplicate it.)

Note that many translations are out of date, so you'll probably want to start
from the English version if possible, just to be sure you don't miss anything
(because I use English so it's always up to date with the current release.)

Once you've finished translating, send me the translated man page and message
catalog and I'll include it in a future version of the editor.

-- Changing key bindings ------------------------------------------------------

Key bindings are defined in screen.c, in the function init_slang_keys().  That
function is a sequence of lines that ought to look something like this:

    SLkp_define_keysym("\033\150", SL_KEY_LEFT);   /* Alt-H  */
    SLkp_define_keysym("\033\152", SL_KEY_DOWN);   /* Alt-J  */
    ...
    SLkp_define_keysym("\014", LPE_REFRESH_KEY);   /* Ctrl-L */
    SLkp_define_keysym("\032", LPE_SUSPEND_KEY);   /* Ctrl-Z */

This does just what it looks like it does: defines the keys for all the editor
commands.  The value in the first parameter is the key binding for a given
command, identified by the second parameter.  You can define two key bindings
for a command by including two calls to SLkp_define_keysym, as seen in the yank
command.  You can also define multi-key bindings for a command, as demonstrated
by the cursor movement keys.  (Actually, in the case of cursor movement, those
are escape sequences that come from a single key.  The same technique works for
bindings that require typing two keystrokes.)

The one key you can't change is the interrupt key, because it comes from your
terminal settings.  If you're intent on changing this, try passing 0 as the
first parameter to the SLang_init_tty call in init_slang(), then write a
handler for the desired new interrupt key, in input.c, which simply sets the
global variable 'quit' to 1 and returns.  A similar technique will cause the
minibuf to support your new interrupt character as well.