File: INSTALL

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maildrop 2.9.3-2
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                                  Requirements

     * C++ compiler - A C++ compiler is required.
     * make - The GNU make is recommended. Solaris's make is to be avoided.
       xBSD already has a gmake port, install it and use it (use gmake
       everywhere this document refers to make).
     * GDBM/DB - optional.
     * The PCRE library (http:/www.pcre.org) is required.
     * The Courier Unicode Library (http://www.courier-mta.org/unicode) must
       be installed first.
     * Courier Authentication Library - optional, for LDAP, MySQL, or
       PostgreSQL support.

       If the configure script detects that the Courier Authentication
       Library is installed, support for courier-authlib gets automatically
       compiled. Use the --disable-authlib option to manually disable
       courier-authlib support.

       When courier-authlib support is enabled, the -d option to maildrop
       will look up the account using the Courier Authentication Library,
       making it possible to store mail account configuration in an LDAP,
       MySQL, or a PostgreSQL database. See the courier-authlib documentation
       for more information.

       See http://www.courier-mta.org/authlib/ for more information.

         NOTE:

         When using the standalone maildrop build with courier-authlib, one
         of the following configurations must be used:

            * Your mail server must invoke maildrop as the root user (the -d
              flag reads the mail account's uid and gid, then drops root).
            * Manually change the permissions on the maildrop binary to be
              setuid root.
            * Manually change the permissions on the courier-authlib's socket
              directory (/usr/local/var/spool/authdaemon by default) to be
              globally readable or executable.

         The default permissions on courier-authlib's socket directory blocks
         world-access to the filesystem socket connected to courier-authlib's
         authentication daemon process. In order for maildrop to connect to
         the authentication library, maildrop must either have root
         privileges (which will be temporary, as soon as maildrop determines
         the account's userid and groupid, it will drop root, before reading
         the maildroprc file), or courier-authlib's socket directory must
         have world read and execute permission.

         Note that if the permissions on the socket directory are changed,
         anyone on the system can connect and obtain any account's password!

         It is the system administrator's responsibility to choose the
         appropriate security policy when using the Courier Authentication
         Library.

         NOTE:

         When using the option to have maildrop invoked as root, an
         additional option to automatically create a new account's home
         directory becomes possible.

         This uses the AUTH_MKHOMEDIR_SKEL environment variable. If this
         environment variable is set, it must point to a template directory
         such as /etc/skel. If the environment variable is set, and the
         authenticated account's home directory does not exist, the contents
         of the template directory get recursively copied into the new home
         directory. The permissions of AUTH_MKHOMEDIR_SKEL and its contents
         are preserved, and the owner userid and groupid is set to the
         authenticated account's userid and groupid.

         Consult your mail server's documentation for more information on how
         to initialize the mail delivery agent's environment variables.

                              Installing maildrop

   The typical sequence of commands to install maildrop is as follows. You
   will likely need to use the GNU version of make. Other makes may not work.
   See below for definition of various options to the configure script:

    ./configure [options]
    make
    make install-strip
    make install-man

   If the make command stops with syntax error in any Makefile, you probably
   have an older make utility. See if you have a gmake command available. If
   so, rerun configure as follows:

 ./configure [options] MAKE=gmake

   Then execute the remaining commands, replacing make with gmake every time.

   If make install-strip fails, try make install.

   The configure script creates Makefile, and config.h. After running
   configure, you may want to edit xconfig.h, and config.h in order to make
   minor adjustments to the configuration.

   Some versions of make may have problems handling the Makefile. If your
   make gives you errors, try using the gmake command instead - the GNU make.

   NOTE: configure attempts to automatically configure the following options
   for maildrop according to your specific system. After running configure,
   you should review these options and make any necessary adjustments.

WHAT GETS INSTALLED

   If you're upgrading, read UPGRADING below.

   The following assumes that the default options are used. The usual GNU
   toolchain options can be used to relocate files from their default
   locations (run ./configure --help for more information).

     * /usr/local/bin - A number of binaries will be installed here, starting
       with the main binary, maildrop, as well as additional utilities:
       dotlock, maildirmake, makemime, reformail, and reformime. If certain
       options are selected, some additional binaries may be installed here
       as well.

     * /usr/local/man - manual pages.

     * /usr/local/include - C header files, for development, if the
       --with-devel option is specified to the configure script.

     * /usr/local/lib - C libraries, for development, if the --with-devel
       option is specified to the configure script.

     * /usr/local/share/maildrop/html - HTML versions of manual pages
       installed in /usr/local/man.

   These are the default directories. The defaults can be changed using the
   standard autoconf options, run ./configure --help for more information.

UPGRADING

    From version 1.1 or earlier.

   Read UPGRADE for some important notes. The default installation
   directory/layout has changed.

    From version 0.70 or earlier.

   The --with-gdbm option has been renamed to --with-db. Its functionality
   remains the same. The name change is due to some internal housekeeping.

    From version 0.65, or earlier.

   If possible, use a prebuilt package on platforms with a package manager
   (rpm on Red Hat and derived distributions, deb on Debian, etc). If you've
   been compiling and instaling maildrop manually, be aware of the following
   changes when upgrading from 0.65 or earlier.

     * The makegdbm utility has been renamed as makedat, to better reflect
       the fact that it can be compiled with DB as well as GDBM database
       support.

     * Config scripts from earlier versions usually created a Makefile that
       automatically gzipped all manual pages during installation. This code
       has been taken out. make install now installs uncompressed manual
       pages only. If you do a make install, you'll need to go in and
       manually remove gzipped manual pages from the previous version of
       maildrop.

     * You will need to have Perl 5 available to complete the compilation and
       installation process.

Operating system specific notes

   This section will list any platform-depended issues.

    Solaris

   This problem has been reported for Solaris 2.6. Other Solaris versions or
   related platforms can be affected. Symptom - trying to run maildrop
   results in an error message saying that libstdc++ cannot be opened.

   Solaris's run time linker has a problem running C++ applications which
   have the setuid or setgid bit set. On Solaris, libstdc++ (the runtime C++
   library) is installed in /usr/local/lib. Solaris's runtime linker will
   only open shared libraries in /usr/lib for programs with the setuid or
   setgid bit set.

   Maildrop is installed with the setuid and setgid bits set, so that
   maildrop can change to the recipient's userid and group id. There are
   three easy workarounds.

    1. If you can configure your mail transport agent to set the correct user
       and group IDs before running maildrop, maildrop will not need the
       setuid and setgid privileges. After running make install-strip, go
       ahead and manually turn these bits off for the maildrop, dotlock, and
       reformail.

    2. Create a soft link from /usr/lib/localto /usr/local/lib, and add
       /usr/lib/local to the LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable.

    3. Create a soft link to libstdc++ from /usr/libto /usr/local/lib

    Any sendmail platform

   There are two quirks that anyone installing maildrop on a sendmail-based
   system should be aware of.

     * Unlike other mail transport agents, most sendmails completely discard
       error messages from the local delivery agent. Therefore, you should
       use the --enable-syslog=1 flag to configure on systems running
       sendmail, unless you are very familiar with maildrop. Without this
       flag, if you have any problems and maildrop is not installed
       correctly, you will end up with a bunch of deferred mail, and
       absolutely nothing to indicate why. Although maildrop will report an
       error message, sendmail will discard the message without recording it
       anywhere. With the --enable-syslog=1 option enabled, you at least get
       to see the error messages in your syslog. However, please note that
       syslog will now show any fatal maildrop errors resulting from botched
       user recipe files.

     * Interactive or background delivery mode. Usually the default sendmail
       delivery mode is i - interactive, or b - background. It appears that
       some versions of sendmail have a minor conflict with maildrop's
       default security level. The conflict arises in a situation where a
       local user sends a message to another local user. It appears that at
       least some versions of sendmail invoke maildrop with the userid set to
       the sender, and the -d option specifying the recipient. The default
       maildrop configuration allows only certain "trusted" users to use the
       -d option. What will happen is that maildrop will report an error, and
       return an exit code to sendmail indicating a temporary error. The
       message will be deferred, and on the next queue run, sendmail will
       attempt to re-deliver it. But now, sendmail will do a queue run as
       root, and root is allowed to use the -d option, so the message is
       delivered.

   Note that this applies ONLY if you have maildrop defined as the local
   delivery agent in sendmail.cf. This will happen if maildrop is invoked
   from a .forward file. There are three possible solutions: do nothing,
   since no real harm is done, local mail simply gets delivered with some
   delay; you can change the default queueing method (in sendmail.cf) to
   queue messages; or, you can specify --enable-restrict-trusted=0 option to
   configure, and lift the restriction on the -d option. However, keep in
   mind that the --enable-restrict-trusted=0 option allows a malicious user
   use the -d option to mailbomb another local user's mailbox. This is why
   the option is enabled by default. Of course, the same can also be
   accomplished by funneling the mailbomb through sendmail, instead of
   running maildrop directly. However, I can only tighten things up on my
   end; I presume that throttling mechanisms are in place in sendmail to
   block that avenue of attack.

    Any AFS platform

   If you're using AFS, it is possible that daemon processes will not even
   have the read privileges on their effective userid's home directory.
   maildrop likes to keep its temporary files in $HOME/.tmp, instead of
   creating them in a shared public directory. You will need to specify the
   --disable-tempdir flag when running configure, which configures maildrop
   to use /tmp or /var/tmp for temporary file storage. (NOTE - this is
   already a default option effective with maildrop 1.1)

Options to configure

   Although most configuration is done as described in the following section,
   I am migrating them to the configure script. Currently, configure support
   the following options:
    

     * --enable-DEBUG - specifying this parameter to configure enables some
       debugging code. Used only by those who know how to use it. :-)

     * --without-db - do not compile support for GDBM or DB databases.
       Because supporting GDBM/DB databases significantly increases the size
       of maildrop, GDBM/DB support can be omitted. If you do not have
       GDBM/DB libraries, configure automatically disables GDBM/DB support.
       Specifying --without-db disables the gdbmopen, gdbmclose, gdbmfetch,
       and gdbmstore functions, and does not compile or install the
       maildrop.makedat utility.

     * --with-db=db - use the Berkeley DB library instead of GDBM. This
       option will transparently use libdb.a instead of libgdbm.a. The
       gdbmopen, gdbmclose, gdbmfetch, and gdbmstore functions work exactly
       the same, but they will use libdb instead of libgdbm.

     * --with-etcdir=directory - use the specified directory instead of /etc,
       which is where maildrop expects to find some configuration files and
       directories.

     * --enable-syslog=1 - if specified, maildrop will log all fatal errors
       to syslog(3). This is recommended for sendmail, which does not log
       error messages for delivery agents.

     * --enable-maildrop-uid=root and --enable-maildrop-gid=mail - sets the
       userid and the groupid for the maildrop, maildirmake, and dotlock
       programs. If not specified, they default to "root" and "mail"
       respectively. See MAILBOX_MODE and RESET_GID below for more
       information.

     * --with-devel - install development libraries and include files. This
       option causes make install to copy over and install libraries, include
       files, and manual pages, that are used by maildrop to parse and
       process E-mail messages.

   Most systems invoke the mail delivery agent and specify the account to
   which the message is addressed. The mail delivery agent is a program
   that's owned by root, and has the set-user-id bit set. The mail delivery
   agent then immediately resets its userid to whomever the message is
   addressed to.

   Some mail systems run the delivery agent without specifying the recipient
   on the command line. The user id is set by the mail system before running
   the mail delivery agent. In this case, root privileges are not required,
   and you may manually remove the set-user-id bit after installing maildrop.

   Some mail systems may use group privileges in order to write to the system
   mailbox directory. maildrop is installed with the set-group-id bit set as
   well, and the mail group is assumed to be 'mail'.  If a mail group other
   than 'mail' is used, specify it via the --enable-maildrop-gid option. You
   will also need to set the RESET_GID variable to 0 (see below). If
   RESET_GID is left alone to its default value of 1, maildrop will drop any
   acquired group ID right away, so its not necessary to remove the setgid
   bit. maildrop attempts to detect if this is the case, but you always need
   to confirm this.
    

     * --enable-sendmail=program - sets the initial value for the SENDMAIL
       environment variable for maildrop recipes. This is the pathname to the
       default mail delivery agent. If this option is not specified,
       configure will try to find it itself.

     * --enable-lockext-def=extension - sets the initial value for the
       LOCKEXT environment variable in maildrop. This is the filename
       extension of dotlock files. The default is ".lock".

     * --enable-locksleep-def=seconds - sets the initial value for the
       LOCKSLEEP environment variable. This is how long maildrop waits before
       trying to create a dotlock file again, if the dotlock file already
       exists. The default is 5 seconds.

     * --enable-locktimeout-def=seconds - sets the initial value for the
       LOCKTIMEOUT environment variable. This is how long maildrop waits
       before removing a stale dotlock file. The default is 60 seconds.

     * --enable-lockrefresh-def=seconds- sets the initial value for the
       LOCKREFRESH environment variable. This is how often maildrop refreshes
       its own dotlock files, to keep them from going stale. The default is
       15 seconds.

   See the manual page for maildropfilter for more information on these
   variables.

     * --enable-tempdir=directory - sets the name of a subdirectory in each
       user's home directory where maildrop writes temporary files. maildrop
       will create this directory, if missing. The default is .tmp.

     * --disable-tempdir - do not use a subdirectory, instead create
       temporary files in a shared /tmp or /var/tmp directory. May be
       required on systems where daemon processes execute without privileges
       to access shared filesystems. This is now the default option starting
       with maildrop 1.1.

     * --enable-smallmsg=bytes - sets the size of a message, in bytes, before
       maildrop saves the message in a temporary file. Smaller messages are
       read in memory, and filtered and delivered directly from memory. In
       order to avoid consuming excessive amounts of expensive RAM, maildrop
       saves larger messages in a temporary file. If the standard input to
       maildrop is a file, a temporary file is not necessary. The default is
       8192 bytes.

     * --enable-global-timeout=seconds - sets numbers of seconds that
       maildrop is willing to spend in order to deliver a single message.
       This value becomes a hard coded limit. When the time expires, maildrop
       terminates with an EX_TEMPFAIL error code. This is intended to stop
       runaway mail filters. The default is 300 seconds (five minutes).

     * --enable-crlf-term=flag - if set to 1, maildrop saves messages in the
       mailbox with each line terminated by a carriage return/line feed
       sequence. When set to 0, lines will be terminated by the linefeed
       character only. The default value is 0.

     * --enable-restrict-trusted=flag - if set to 1, maildrop permits only
       certain "trusted" user or group IDs to use the -d option. Setting this
       variable to 0 allows anyone to use the -d option (provided that
       maildrop has set-userid-to-root privileges). This allows certain
       denial-of-service attacks, so this setting is not recommended. The
       default value is 1.

     * --enable-keep-fromline=flag - if set to 1, when maildrop saves a
       message to a mailbox file, it will use the same From_line address
       which was present in the original message. If the original message
       lacked a From_ line, maildrop will use the name of the user running
       maildrop. If set to 0, maildrop will keep the original From_ line
       address only if invoked by root, and reset it otherwise. The default
       value of this option is the value of the --enable-restrict-trusted
       option. Note that this option is new to maildrop version 0.54b. The
       logic in the previous version of maildrop was always the same as if
       this option was 0. Therefore, depending upon the value of the
       --enable-restrict-trusted flag, you may find that maildrop behavior
       changes with version 0.54b. This option also controls the semantics of
       the -f option to maildrop (see below).

     * --enable-trusted-users='...' - sets the list of users allowed to use
       the -d option if --enable-restrict-trusted is set to 1. If
       --enable-restrict-trusted is set to 0, this option is not used. Put a
       list of user IDs allowed to use the -d option between the apostrophes,
       separated by single spaces. If your mail transport agent uses maildrop
       as the local delivery agent this list must include the userid that the
       mail transport agent runs as. If this option is not specified,
       maildrop attempts to put together a list including common mail system
       user ids.

     * --enable-trusted-groups='...' - this is similar to the
       --enable-trusted-users option, but specifies a list of group IDs
       instead of user IDs. If --enable-restrict-trusted option is used, the
       -d option will be permitted only if the real userid, of whoever's
       invoking maildrop, is included in the trusted users list, OR if the
       real groupid is included in the trusted groups list, OR if the
       effective groupid is included in the trusted groups list.

       CAUTION: the default configuration script installs maildrop with the
       set group ID bit set, so that the effective groupid will always be the
       same in the default maildrop configuration. If this group ID is
       included in the trusted groups list, this effectively will allow
       everyone to use the -d option.

       The trusted groups feature has been implemented in order to add
       additional flexibility in setting up a secure maildrop environment. If
       the --enable-trusted-groups option is not used, the trusted groups
       list is empty, so that the semantics of the trusted users option
       remains the same as with previous versions of maildrop.

     * --enable-use-flock=flag - if this option is set to 1, maildrop will
       use either the flock(), the lockf(), or the fcntl() system call to
       lock a mailbox file when delivering a message. On most systems, all
       three use compatible locking mechanisms. In some very isolated cases,
       flock(), lockf(), and fcntl(), are different, incompatible, locking
       mechanisms. maildrop must use the same locking mechanism as any mail
       reading programs. The configuration script will run some tests to
       determine what locking function calls are available, and will choose
       one by itself. The --with-locking-method can be used to manually
       choose the locking function call to use.

     * --with-locking-method=name - manually select a locking function call.
       name is either "fcntl", "flock", or "lockf". Otherwise the
       configuration script will pick one by itself.

     * --enable-use-dotlock=flag - if this option is set to 1, maildrop will
       create .lock files in order to gain access to the system mailbox file.
       If this option is set to 0, maildrop will not use .lock files
       automatically. However, the dotlock command can still be used to
       manually create .lock files. The default value for this option is 1,
       unless maildrop detects that the system mailbox directory does not
       have the sticky bit set (set below), in which case the default option
       is 0. maildrop attempts to figure out what the locking mechanism is
       used by the mail reading programs. A mail reading program can only
       create dotlock files in the system mailbox directory if the sticky bit
       is set. Note, it is possible for both --enable-use-flockand
       --enable-use-dotlock to be set to 1, in which case both locking
       mechanisms are used simultaneously.

     * --with-trashquota - include deleted messages, and the Trash folder, in
       the estimated quota usage for maildirs. This should be used if related
       packages (SqWebMail, Courier-IMAP) were also compiled with the
       --with-trashquota option.

     * --with-dirsync - after delivering a new message to a maildir
       explicitly sync the maildir's directory directory. There's a school of
       thought which believes that the Linux ext2 filesystem requires the
       parent directory to be synced, in addition to the new message file
       that's just been written to disk. There's another school of thought
       that thinks that this issue is completely blown out of proportion, and
       is really nothing more than a tempest in a teapot. However -- to
       accomodate the former school of thought -- this option adds a little
       bit of extra code to sync the parent directory.

  Selecting an alternate C++ compiler

   maildrop is written in C++. Some systems may have more than one C++
   compiler available. If the default C++ compiler that's selected by the
   configure script doesn't work, you may try an alternate C++ compiler.
   First, you must extract the tarball again, into a different directory.
   Then, before running ./configure, set the CXX environment variable to the
   C++ compiler to be used. For example, to select the CC compiler:


 $ CXX=CC
 $ export CXX
 $ ./configure [options]

   Then proceed as usual. The CXXFLAGS environment variable can also be used
   to override compiler flags that configure selects.

  Configuring the location of the system mailbox

   When maildrop has a message to deliver to a user, maildrop must know where
   user's mailbox is. Different systems use different places to store E-mail,
   and different mechanisms to access it. And even on the same operating
   system you may have variations due to different mail software.

   Here are just some of the possible scenarios that may exist that maildrop
   knows how to handle:
    

     * All users' mailboxes usually are stored in a single directory, and the
       name of the mailbox is the user name. On systems with many mailboxes,
       the mailbox directory can be partitioned into a hierarchical tree,
       based upon the initial letters of the user name. For example, the
       mailbox for the user jtomas is /var/mail/j/jt/jthomas; mail for sjones
       is stored in /var/mail/s/sj/sjones.

     * Instead of storing mail in a separate directory, the system may store
       incoming mail in each user's home directory.

     * Instead of storing mail in a traditional mailbox file, the system may
       implement a directory based format called maildir, that was introduced
       in the Qmail mail server. With maildrop as your local delivery agent
       you may implement the maildir format without having to use Qmail
       itself. Maildir is a much more efficient mail storage format which
       requires far less overhead. No locking of any kind is needed; multiple
       instances of maildrop can dump mail into the same maildir at the same
       time.

     * When mail is saved in a traditional mailbox file, only one program may
       access the file at the same time. In order to synchronize access to
       the mailbox file, the traditional mechanism uses a separate dot-lock
       file. Newer systems may also use the flock() function on the mailbox
       file itself. maildrop, by default, uses both mechanisms, except in one
       case (see the --enable-use-dotlock option to configure, above), but
       one or the other can always be selected to be used exclusively.

     * Traditionally, the directory where system mailboxes reside has the
       sticky bit set; all individual files are owned by their respective
       users, with read/write permissions set for the user only, and
       dot-locking is used to lock the mailbox. An alternative arrangement is
       to remove the sticky bit from the directory, the directory has the
       mail group ownership, and each mailbox is owned by the user, and the
       mail group, with read/write privileges given to the owner. The mail
       delivery agent runs under the user id, and the mail group id. This
       allows the mail delivery agent to create new mailboxes, and have the
       write permission on the user's mailbox. The flock() function is used
       to lock an individual mailbox.

   As you can see, there is a lot of variation in possible mail setups. It is
   important that maildrop is configured to match your existing mail setup. 
   The configure script tries to automatically figure out the correct
   settings, but you MUST always verify the output file, config.h, to make
   sure that the settings are correct. Description of each variable defined
   in config.hfollows. In addition, there are certain variables defined in a
   different file, xconfig.h. These are settings that config.h cannot
   automatically determine.

    DEFAULT_DEF

   This variable specifies the initial setting for the DEFAULT variable in
   maildrop, which should be the location of the system default mailbox. If
   DEFAULT_DEF begins with a slash, it should refer to a directory, and
   maildrop will automatically append the user's name.

   If it doesn't begin with a slash, maildrop will prepend the user's home
   directory to DEFAULT_DEF. To use maildrop with qmail, which normally
   delivers to $HOME/Mailbox, set DEFAULT_DEF to ./Mailbox.

   The '=' character in DEFAULT_DEF gets replaced by progressive characters
   from the user name of the user whose mail is being delivered. For example,
   if mail to the user name "john" is delivered to /var/mail/j/jo/john and
   mail to user "root" is delivered to /var/mail/r/ro/root, DEFAULT_DEF
   should be set to /var/mail/=/== (maildrop automatically appends the full
   user name as the last component).

   If the DEFAULT_DEF/DEFAULT variable refers to a directory, maildrop
   assumes that it is delivering the message to a maildir, otherwise maildrop
   will deliver mail to a mailbox file, creating a new file if necessary.
   maildrop does not deliver mail to flat directory, like procmail. If you
   need to save messages in a directory, use the included program,
   maildirmake, to create a maildir directory.

    MAILBOX_MODE and RESET_GID

   Here are the required setting in two of the most common mailbox
   environments:
    

     * Mailbox spool directory has the sticky bit set, mailboxes are readable
       and writable by the user only - set MAILBOX_MODE to 0600, and
       RESET_GID to 1.

     * Mailbox spool directory does not have the sticky bit set, is writable
       by the mail group ID, mailboxes are readable and writable by the user
       ID - set MAILBOX_MODE to 0600, and RESET_GID to 0.

   MAILBOX_MODE are the permissions maildrop uses to create new mailbox
   files. If a mailbox file already exists, maildrop is not going to change
   its permissions.

   RESET_GID indicates whether maildrop should immediately drop any
   set-group-id privileges. maildrop is installed with the set-group-id bit
   set with maildrop's group id set to the mail group. If system mailbox
   files have read/write access by both the user and the mail group, set
   RESET_GID to 0 to keep the mail group ID, and specify the mail groupusing
   the --enable-maildrop-gid flag to configure (see above).

    TRUSTED_USERS

   If --enable-restrict-trusted option given to the configure script is set
   to 1 (this is the default), maildrop allows only the users listed in this
   environment variable to use the -d option. See the online documentation
   for the description of the -d option.

   Mail can be delivered in two different ways:
    

     * The mail transport agent runs with root privileges. To deliver mail to
       a local user, the mail transport agent runs maildrop after changing
       the user id to the local user. In this case the -d option is not
       needed.

     * The mail transport agent runs as a non-privileged user. To deliver
       mail to a local user, the mail transport agent runs the mail delivery
       agent and specifies the user name with the -d option. The mail
       delivery agent is expected to be a program with root privileges, and
       it immediately must change its userid to the one specified by the -d
       option. If this is the case, you must include the mail transport
       agent's userid in the TRUSTED_USERS variable.

   If --enable-restrict-trusted option given to the configure script is set
   to 0, anyone can use the -d option. That is not recommended, it leaves
   open a possibility for certain denial-of-service attacks.

  Other configuration variables

   The configure script also sets the following variables in autoconf.h.
   After running the configure script, you may need to make some adjustments
   to these variables also.

    DEFAULT_PATH

   This variable in "autoconf.h" sets the initial contents of the PATH
   variable, which is the initial system search path for commands invoked by
   maildrop as child processes.

    SENDMAIL_DEF

   This variable in "autoconf.h" sets the initial contents of the SENDMAIL
   variable, which is the local mail transport agent. maildrop runs this
   program when instructed to deliver mail to a mailbox whose name begins
   with the forwarding "!" character.

    Other variables in autoconf.h

   All the other variables are self explanatory, and rarely need to be
   changed.

Using maildrop with sendmail

   Maildrop can be easily used as sendmail's local delivery agent, instead of
   procmail. Here is the suggested entry for sendmail.cf, courtesy of Eric J.
   Schwertfeger <ejs@bfd.com>:


 Mlocal,         P=/usr/local/bin/maildrop, F=lsAw5:/|@SPfhn, S=10/30, R=20/40,
                 T=DNS/RFC822/X-Unix,
                 A=maildrop -d $u

   You may also consider including the D, F, and M flags as well.

The -f option to maildrop

   The -f option is new to version 0.55. The -f option sets the initial value
   of the FROM variable. If no -f option is given, maildrop looks at any
   From_ line in the message being delivered, otherwise it defaults to the
   name of the user who invoked maildrop.

   If the --enable-keep-fromline option is set to 0, anyone may use the -f
   option. If --enable-keep-fromline is set to 1, only "trusted" users (as
   defined by --enable-trusted-users) may use the -f option (ignored for
   everyone else).

   The initial value of the FROM variable is also used in the From_ line for
   the message when maildrop saves it in a mailbox file. Although a recipe
   may change the contents of the FROM variable, only the initial value gets
   saved in the From_ line.

  Maildirs

   maildrop supports an alternative mail storage format called "maildir".
   Unlike regular mailboxes, maildirs do not require locking, and are much
   faster to use. Support for maildirs is not universal, but the number of
   software packages that understands maildirs is constantly growing.

   A maildir is a specially formatted directory, where messages are stored as
   individual files, according to certain conventions. Use the maildirmake
   command to create a maildir, with its structure and permissions properly
   set:

   maildirmake ./Maildir

   This creates a subdirectory in the current directory called "Maildir",
   which is then prepared to store E-mail messages.

  Maildir folder extension

   This version of maildrop supports two extensions to the traditional
   maidlir format: folders and quotas. The standard maildir format does not
   support any kind of a folder hierarchy, and depends on the underlying
   filesystem to enforce maximum usage quotas.

   It is important to note that at this time not all maildir software
   supports these extensions. Support is implemented mainly in other Courier
   packages. Descriptions of these extension are freely available, hopefully
   other software packages will add support for these extensions too.

   Names of folders are limited by the maximum filename size of your
   filesystem, and the names may not start with a period. Use the -f option
   to maildirmake to create a new folder:

   maildirmake -f Important ./Maildir

   "./Maildir" must already be an existing maildir. The -f flag creates a
   folder inside an existing maildir. A folder is just a subdirectory within
   a maildir that is itself a maildir. The name of the subdirectory is the
   folder name prefixed by a period. Also, the folder subdirectory contains a
   zero-length file called "maildirfolder".

   Maildrop can deliver to folders just like to regular maildirs:

   to "./Maildir/.Important"

   Anywhere maildrop can deliver to a maildir, it can also deliver to a
   maildir folder.

   See the manual page for maildirmake for more information.

  Maildir quota extension

   The quota extension allows maximum maildir quotas to be enforced where
   filesystem-based quotas are not available, or cannot be used. This quota
   mechanism has a number of limitations which are discussed in the manual
   page for maildirquota, which contains more information.

   Quota enforcement can be implemented by setting the MAILDIRQUOTA variable
   in maildrop, as described in the maildirquota manual page.

   Of course, quotas will be enforced only when maildrop is used to deliver
   mail. Other applications, that do not understand the quota enhancement,
   will not enforce any quotas. Mail delivered to a maildir by other
   applications will not figure in quota calculation for some period of time.
   Eventually, a regularly scheduled quota recalculation will pick them up
   and include them in the current maildir quota.