File: README

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most 5.0.0a-4
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Compiling MOST requires an ANSI C compiler.  In addition you MUST have
a copy of the S-Lang library version 2.X.  Version 1 is nolonger
supported.  This library is available from
<http://www.jedsoft.org/slang/>.

                          INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
			  
On Unix, you should be able to simply type:

    ./configure; make

at the Unix prompt.   If you are using CYGWIN, you will need to ensure
that libslang.dll is on your PATH; otherwise the chkslang program will
not run.

If using DJGPP or MINGW32, do:
   
    <edit src/makefile.w32, setting ARCH to either dgj or gw32>
    cd src
    make -f makefile.w32

For VMS, edit the file `vmsmake.com'.  When finished, either type `@vmsmake'
or `@vmsmake gcc' at the VMS prompt.  Once MOST has been created, it must be
installed as a foreign command.  This means that you must first type:

      $  most :== $device:[dir.containing.most]most.exe

I suggest that you first build MOST then view the doc file using MOST (`most
most.doc').  If you need help, hit the `h' key from within MOST. 

MOST understands the following environment variables:

    MOST_SWITCHES 
    MOST_EDITOR, SLANG_EDITOR, EDITOR
    MOST_INITFILE
    MOST_HELP

  1. MOST_SWITCHES is a list of commonly used switches.  

  2. MOST_EDITOR and SLANG_EDITOR are formatted strings describing what
     editor to use.  The string can contain %s and %d formatting descriptors
     that represent the file name and line number, respectively.  For
     example, if JED is your editor, then set MOST_EDITOR to 'jed %s -g %d'.
     Since MOST is just one of several programs that use the S-Lang library,
     I suggest that you use SLANG_EDITOR instead of MOST_EDITOR.

 3. MOST_INITFILE specifies a configuration file for MOST.  One can specifiy
    keymaps, colors, etc. via this file.  In the absence of
    MOST_INITFILE, the program will look for a file call .mostrc in
    the home directory (most.rc on non-Unix systems).

    See `lesskeys.rc' for an example of a key definition file that
    causes MOST to emulate the `less' pager.  See also most-fun.txt
    for a list of functions that can be used for key definitions.  The
    file `most.rc' list the bindings that are built-in to the
    viewer.

 4. If MOST_HELP is defined to point to an existing file, MOST will load a
    file as a help file.  This is useful for describing custom keymaps.
    
Any problems with MOST should be reported to davis@space.mit.edu.

  [Note also that this is really the first non-trivial C program that
  I ever wrote.  Because of this, much of the code appears very
  amateurish.  For example, I tried very hard to avoid C constructs
  that some some authors considered very bad, e.g., goto, continue,
  break.  Of course this made some of the code convoluted, e.g.,
  contrast

      int test = 1;
      while (test)
       {
           function ();

           if (-1 == some_function ())
	     test = 0;
	   
	   if (test)
	     some_other_function ();
       }
       
   with:
       
       while (1)
         {
	    function ();
	    if (-1 == some_function ()) break;
	    some_other_function ();
	 }

   I have since concluded that many text-book authors never actually
   wrote anything non-trivial.  Whenever I work on MOST, I try to make
   some changes in an effort to clean it up. ]

--John Davis