File: mount.app.1

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.TH MOUNT.APP 1 "August 1 2003" 
.SH NAME
 mount.app - The WindowMaker universal mount point
.SH SYNOPSIS
.br
 mount.app [options] [-display <disp>]
.SH OPTIONS
.br
 -h, -help	prints help
 -i		Ignore NFS mounts
 -n		Window manager is other than WindowMaker
 -display disp	Select target display (see X manual pages)
.SH DESCRIPTION
.B mount.app
gives you a WindowMaker dockable applet from which you can
mount/unmount your different devices with a simple point-and-click
interface, as well as usage statistics for the currently mounted
devices. 
.PP
Once you launch it, drag it to the dock, set it to be autolaunched,
and enjoy. 
.PP
press the "<" and ">" arrow buttons to select a device / mount point.
press the mount button (the one with a bolt symbol) to mount or unmount.
Double-click on the drive icon to open a program at the mount point
(Midnight Commander for example).  Double click on the black background
to launch the config app.
.PP
Clicking on the bar to the left of the arrows (which is black when
unmounted, green when mounted and yellow while mounting) makes
mount.app mount or unmount the device.
.PP
Double-clicking on the device's icon opens a program to browse its
contents (in the default configuration, an instance of Midnight
Commander in a terminal window).
.PP
Double-clicking on the background area runs mount.conf, mount.app's
configuration manager.
.PP
If you run mount.app as non-root, and none of your devices are marked as
user-mountable, then mount.app will display only the last mount point
listed in your /etc/fstab file.  Read the documentation that came with your
distribution about how to make devices user mountable.  In general it
involves adding the option "user" to the list of options in /etc/fstab.
(the mount(8) and fstab(5) man pages are good reading as well)
.PP
If you make any modifications on the "Icons" tab, you'll have to restart
mount.app for them to take effect.  All other modifications should happen
automagically when you hit the "Make it so" button.
.PP
mount.app stores its configuration in ~/GNUstep/Defaults/mount.app but
you should never have to edit this file directly, unless you need to tweak
something that is not yet configurable from the config app (like fonts and
colors).
.SH MAKING NEW ICONS
You don't like mount.app's icons?  Well then fire up the gimp and make
some new ones.  Just take one of the existing ones as a sample, modify it
to hearts content, then save it to your icondir with the others.  Fire up
the config app and assign one of the "User defined" icon types to it (Or
even override one of the default pixmaps) then assign that icon type to a
mount point.  That's it!
.PP
Unfortunately, because of the way mount.app initializes itself, it cannot
automatically load the new pixmap when the config app quits.  You'll have
to kill the dock app and restart it. (The same is true of mount.app's
colors and fonts).
.SH SEE ALSO
.BR
mount.conf (1)
.SH AUTHOR
Steve Borho (borho@stlnet.com)
.SH WEBSITE
http://mountapp.sourceforge.net