File: INSTALL

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mutt 0.91.2-2
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Supported platforms
===================

Mutt has been reported to compile and run under the following Unix operating
systems:

	AIX
	BSDI
	Convex
	Data General Unix (DG/UX)
	Digital Unix (OSF/1)
	DYNIX/ptx
	FreeBSD
	HP-UX
	IRIX
	Linux
	Atari MiNT
	MkLinux
	NetBSD
	QNX
	Solaris
	SunOS
	Ultrix
	UnixWare

- An ANSI C compiler (such as gcc) is required.

- You must also have a SysV compatible curses library, or you must
  install either

	GNU ncurses, ftp://prep.ai.mit.edu/pub/gnu/

  or

	S-Lang, ftp://space.mit.edu/pub/davis/slang/

Installation
============

Installing Mutt is rather painless through the use of the GNU autoconf
package.  Simply untar the Mutt distribution, and run the ``configure''
script.  In most cases, it will automatically determine everything it needs
to know in order to compile.  However, there are a few options to
``configure'' to help it out, or change the default behavior:

--prefix=DIR
	install Mutt in DIR instead of /usr/local

--with-sharedir=DIR
	specify where to put architecture independent data files

--with-curses=DIR
	use the curses lib in DIR/lib.  If you have ncurses, ``configure''
	will automatically look in /usr/include/ncurses for the include
	files.

--with-slang[=DIR]
	use the S-Lang library instead of ncurses.  This library seems to
	work better for some people because it is less picky about proper
	termcap entries than ncurses.  It is recommended that you use at
	*least* version 0.99-38 with Mutt.

--with-mailpath=DIR
	specify where the spool mailboxes are located on your system

--with-homespool[=FILE]
	treat file in the user's home directory as the spool mailbox.  Note
	that this is *not* the full pathname, but relative to the user's
	home directory.  Defaults to "mailbox" if FILE is not specified.

--enable-pop
	enable POP3 support

--enable-hidden-host
	local hostname is not part of the FQDN.

--with-rx
	use GNU rx instead of local regexp routines.  Many systems don't
	have the POSIX compliant regcomp/regexec/regfree routines, so this
	provides a way to support them.

--enable-flock
	use flock() to lock files

--disable-fcntl
	by default, Mutt uses fcntl() to lock files.  Over NFS this can
	result in poor performance on read/write.  Note that using this
	option could be dangerous if dotlocking is also disabled

--enable-nfs-fix
	some implementations of NFS do not always write the
	atime/mtime of small files.  This means that Mutt's ``mailboxes''
	feature does not always work properly, as it uses these
	attributes to work out whether the file has new mail.  This
	option enables a workaround to this bug.

--enable-locales-fix
	on some systems, the result of isprint() can't be used reliably
	to decide which characters are printable, even if you set the
	LANG environment variable.  If you set this option, Mutt will
	assume all characters in the ISO-8859-* range are printable.  If
	you leave it unset, Mutt will attempt to use isprint() if either
	of the environment variables LANG, LC_ALL or LC_CTYPE is set,
	and will revert to the ISO-8859-* range if they aren't.

--with-exec-shell=SHELL
	on some versions of unix, /bin/sh has a bug that makes using emacs
	with mutt very difficult.  If you have the problem that whenever
	you press control-G in emacs, mutt and emacs become very confused,
	you may want to try using a Bourne-derived shell other than
	/bin/sh here.  Some shells that may work are bash, zsh, and ksh.
	C shells such as csh and tcsh will amost certainly not work right.
	Note that this option is unrelated to what shell mutt gives you
	when you press '!'.  Only use this option to solve the above problem,
	and only specify one of the above shells as its argument.

--enable-exact-address
	By default, Mutt will rewrite all addresses in the form
		Personal Name <user@host.domain>
	regardless of the input.  By enabling this option, Mutt will write
	addresses in the same form they are parsed.  NOTE: this requires
	significantly more memory

Once ``configure'' has completed, simply type ``make install.''

Mutt should compile cleanly (without errors) and you should end up with a
binary called ``mutt.''  If you get errors about undefined symbols like
A_NORMAL or KEY_MIN, then you probably don't have a SysV compliant curses
library.  You should install either ncurses or S-Lang (see above), and then
run the ``configure'' script again.

Platform Notes
==============

Solaris 2.4

	The system regcomp() and regexec() routines are very badly broken.
	So much so that using them will cause Mutt to be totally unusable.
	The --with-rx option to `configure' should always be used.  (Note:
	the problems have apparently been fixed in Solaris 2.5)

	Color does not work right with Solaris curses.  You will have to
	compile with either ncurses or slang to get working color support.