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ncurses-hexedit 0.9.7-11
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  Hexedit version 0.9.3 by Adam Rogoyski <apoc@laker.net> Temperanc on EFNet
  Copyright (C) 1998, 1999 Adam Rogoyski

  --- GNU General Public License Disclamer ---
  This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
  it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
  the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or
  (at your option) any later version.
  This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
  but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
  MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
  GNU General Public License for more details.


        **   THIS IS NOT THE OFFICIAL DOCUMENTATION **
  I forget to update this file.  The Texinfo or LaTeX documentation is what
is really worth reading.  Look in docs/ direcotry.


  Hexedit Version 0.9.3 is a full screen text mode Hex editor using the
curses library.

  Hexedit needs to be run in a screen with at least 80 columns or it will
not look very good.  At least an 80x10 screen minimum.  It will look fine
at any larger modes.  It should resize fine in an xterm.

I've built and tested this on the following systems:
   Linux 2.0.36 i386    ncurses 4.2 (gcc)
   Linux 2.2.3  i386    ncurses 4.2 (gcc)
   OpenBSD 2.4  i386    ncurses     (gcc)
   SunOS 5.6    Sparc   curses      (gcc)
   AIX 4.3.2    rs6000  curses      (gcc and cc)
   AIX 4.3.2    ppc     curses      (gcc and cc)
   DOS 6.22     i386    pdcurses    (djgpp gcc)
   IRIX 6.3     mips    curses      (gcc)
   HP-UX B.10.20        curses      (gcc)
   SunOS 5.5.1  sparc   curses      (gcc)
   OSF V4.0     alpha   curses      (gcc)


COLOR:

  SunOS/Solaris:
     For color, try TERM=AT386, else vt100.

  AIX Users:
     You can use TERM=aixterm for color, but when not in X it seems
     to get the colors mixed up.

  LINUX USERS:
     If the editor is not using the last line of the screen, you probably
     didn't set your TERM environment to linux.
     in bash:  export TERM=linux
     in tcsh:  setenv TERM linux
     Also try vt100 if linux doesn't work.  Color seems to work with
     TERM=linux.
   


Controls:

Maneuver            Arrow Keys (or h,j,k.l), Home, End
Page Up             Control-y, Control-b, Alt-v, Page Up, u, y
Page Down           Control-v, Control-f, Page Down, v, space
Bytes <=> Text      Tab, Control-i
Insert/Add Byte     Control-a, Insert
Delete byte         control-d, Delete
goTo Offset         Control-t, t
Offset + Jump       +, -, n (jump again)
Help                Control-g
Redraw Screen       Control-l
Save                Control-o
Save and Quit       Control-x
Quit (no save)      Control-c
viEw as text        Control-e 
Search              Control-w, w
find Next           Control-n
Undo                Control-u
ASCII <=> EBCDIC    Control-R
Switch Spacing      Control-P
Binary Calculator   Control-/


   NOTE: 
     - For some commands, Control-x, Control-g and Escape are cancel.
       Escape may take a second to work.  This is normal, it is how curses
       works and deals with input I believe.  
     - Viewing as text may seem messed up when looking at big binary
       chunks (why do you want to view this as text anyways?), but 
       it's fine.  When looking at binary in text, I had to decide how
       to display files with little or no newlines so that text
       portions look ok and the same each time.  So it looks back to the
       last new line and starts from there.  So the part you may want
       to look at may not even be on the screen.  To me, this isn't
       a problem - It's a binary file, look at it in hex!  Also, all non
       printable characters, even newlines, are represented as "." even
       in the full screen text mode.
       NOTE: This only takes a snapshot of the current section, you cannot
       use this feature as a fileviewer of text.  It just lets you see
       a quick snapshot of what it would like like in text.
     - Goto Offset command takes input as either Hex (i.e. 0xFF), Octal
       (i.e. 0377) or Base 10 (i.e. 255).  I know what you're thinking,
       but no, strtol () does this for you.
     - I put a few different ways to page up and down because most
       people are used to vi or emacs.  I personally like how pico is
       set up.  Any other resemblances to pico are purely my doing.
     - Year 2000 compliant. =)
     - Searching uses the Boyer-Moore search algorith, and the whole
       file is in memory, so it's fast.  Real fast.
     - Changes are highlighted in bold.  If you insert or delete a byte,
       all bold is removed until you change something else.  This seems 
       like the best thing to do here.  Or else I'd be highlighting all
       the rest of the file.
     - Undo: for undo, if the modified byte is on the screen, it is reverted
       to its previous state.  If it is not on the screen, you are brought
       to the byte's location so it is viewable on the screen.  The next
       Undo command will revert the byte back to its previous state.
     - Environment variable HEXEDIT can be used to save your command line
       options.  Example, export HEXEDIT=-8r would put hexedit into
       readonly mode with 8-bit printing on by default.

BUGS - DRAWBACKS

      - You currently can only edit files and disks up to 4.2 gigs.
      - On SunOS if you use control-v for page down you have to do it
        twice.  This has to do with the terminal driver interpreting
        Control-v for its purposes.  If there is a portable way to
        changes this let me know.
        *** I've been informed that this is a normal terminal driver thingy.
        Still, how do I get around it?
      - I've had different results with older versions of ncurses.  Tell
        me if anything breaks.  It should work though.


   If there are any problems and bugs please send me mail so I can fix 
   them.  If you have any extra computer stuff, money, guitar stuff,
   or anything Stevie Ray Vaughan that you don't want please contact me.


   Shameless plugs:
      Video Game Expresss! http://www.vgeonline.com
      Lisa Loeb Web Shrine http://www.lisaloeb.org

   Author:
      Adam Rogoyski <apoc@laker.net>
      As of January 1999, I am a sophomore of Computer Science at the
      Univeristy of Texas at Austin.