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netrik 1.16.1-2
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  netrik 1.16.1 (beta)
>====================<


_What it is_ (INTRODUCTION)

Netrik is the ANTRIK Internet Viewer/Browser/Explorer/Navigator/whatever. (Tell
us which one you like best :-) )

Netrik is Free Software published under the GNU GPL; see LICENSE for details.

If you haven't already done so, you may want to take a look at the SourceForge
page at http://netrik.sourceforge.net , where you can read extensive
discussion on topics like: What it is all about; why it is there; how it
developes; what features are intended; why we consider it necessary etc.

For short, netrik intends to be a really fancy text mode WWW browser (somewhat
similar to lynx, links, w3m -- only better ;-) ). Well, that's the plan.
Presently it's rather simple; but has quite a number of unique features
regarding user interface, HTML presentation and others.


_What is new_ (CHANGES)

The 1.16 release adds the new command 'l'. This will enter a special mode, in
which every link on the active screen area gets a unique label (one or two
letters) assigned, and the user can then type these letters to immediately
follow the respective link. (The idea is borrowed from Vimperator, and
implemented in netrik by Evan M. Gates.)

Note that this feature is considered experimental: It might be changed or
entirely replaced by other commands for the same use case in the future.

1.16.1 uses ncursesw instead of ncurses, which makes utf8 work somewhat again.
(Not properly, but back to the partially-broken state it was in before.)

See NEWS for changes in previous releases.


_Where it runs_ (SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS)

Netrik is developed and tested under GNU/Linux and GNU Hurd. However, for now
it doesn't use a lot of stuff specific to GNU. It might require some tweaking,
but should not be too hard to make it work on other UNIX-like systems. There
are reports of running some older versions on FreeBSD and Solaris, for example.
In short: Good luck ;-)

Specifically, it depends on the ncurses library and GNU getopt. GNU readline
and history libraries can be used for fancy command prompt editing. See
TROUBLESHOOTING below for more details.

For viewing pages on FTP servers, or if you don't want to use the builtin HTTP
handling, you also need to have GNU Wget installed. (Of course you can replace
it with your favourite HTTP loader, by using --with-wget-call=... option to
configure.)

Viewing compressed (local) files requires gzip and/or bzip2 installed.


_How to use_ (INSTALL)

Installation is triggered by the typical command sequence:

   ./configure && make && make install

in the netrik directory. (If you got netrik from CVS, you'll have to do
"autoreconf -i" first.)

In the case some of the commands fails without printing a useful diagnostic
message, please send a bug report. (See _Bugs_.)

All installation steps should work automatically; no user interaction is
necessary. However, you may want to set some options influencing important
features of the program. Use

   ./configure --help

to find out what options are available.

Some details of the compiling process can also be influenced by make variables,
e.g.

   CC=gcc-3.0 ./configure

Especially LDFLAGS and CPPFLAGS may be useful, to give the location of a
library and its headers if it resides in an unusual place.

The installation process should be straightforward, if you have all necessary
libraries installed. See _Why it fails_ below if you run into trouble.


For DEBIAN USERS, installation is even simpler: Just use the command

   debuild -b -us -uc

in the unpacked source directory, and then install the resultig package with

   dpkg -i ../netrik_*.deb

(Assuming you have no other .deb matching the wildcard already lying about;
use the shell's <tab>-completion feature to get the correct file name.)


_What you can do with it_ (USAGE)

Well, netrik implements most all basic browser functionality now, so you can do
the same as with any other browser -- read local HTML files, browse the web.
(There are some limitations however: No file save/download, no cookies, no
SSL.)

The most typical use would be invoking with just the name of some local file or
with some HTTP URL as argument (you can usually leave out the "http://"), which
will load the resource and startup in interactive browser mode.

Use 'j' and 'k' to scroll the page, up and down arrows (or uppercase 'J' and
'K') to select links, and the return key to follow a link. (There are many more
link selection commands; you may for example prefer using a combination of
'+'/'-' and <tab>/'p' instead of 'J' and 'K'. See doc/keys.html or doc/keys.txt
for a complete listing.)

See "man netrik" and/or the various documentation files in doc/ for other
invocation methods, command line options, and more browser commands.

Netrik may also be quite useful for a quick test of HTML files (using --debug)
-- it should complain about almost all syntax errors. (The man page has an
example.)


_Why it fails_ (TROUBLESHOOTING)

INSTALLATION (especially on non-GNU systems) often fails because some libries
are missing:

If you want to have fancy command line editing in netrik, you need a shared
library version of the GNU Readline library, and the development files
(headers) going with it. If using GNU/Linux, your distribution should provide a
package named something like "libreadline-dev"; some distributions fail to do
so, however. In that case you can get the source (from your distribution or
from ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/readline/ ) and compile it with "make shared" and
"make install-shared".

You also need the ncurses development files. (These are mandatory.) Your
distribution should provide a "libncurses-dev" package (or something similar);
some distributions have only one "ncurses" package providing both the library
and the development files.

On FreeBSD, the GNU Getopt port (libgnugetopt) needs to be installed.

STARTUP often causes trouble because of a wrong terminal setting: As netrik
normally uses text colors excessiveley, it complains if it can't use colors.
Thus, your $TERM environment variable needs to be set to some color terminal
type in order to run netrik; e.g. "linux", "xterm" or "ansi", but not "linux-m"
or "vt100".

Note: On some systems, the "xterm" terminal definition also doesn't contain the
color settings; if it fails with just "xterm", try "xterm-color" instead.

Netrik can also run in a (very crude) monochrome mode now. If you actually have
a monochrome terminal, you can avoid the warning about colors on each startup:
Use the --bw option on the command line, or put it into your ~/.netrikrc. (See
doc/config.txt or doc/config.html for details.)


_Keeping in Touch_ (MAILING LIST)

As of course you are very interested in netrik ;-), you may want to subscribe
to the mailing list. Probably not all messages will be of interest to you, but
you will have a good overview on current netrik development.

To subscribe, either send a mail to
netrik-general-request@lists.sourceforge.net with the word "subscribe" as
subject, or go to http://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/netrik-general .

Again, you can go to the project homepage at http://netrik.sf.net and find
lots of information there. (Both topical and general.)


_How it works_

Netrik consists basically of three big modules: The layout engine, the
file/HTTP loader, and the pager. However, these aren't clearly separated, but
closely interlocked; especially the loader is coupled very tighly to the layout
engine, or one might say: built around it.

Of these three, the layouting is the biggest and probably most interesting part
-- while the others consist of bunch of specific solutions for all the
different aspects of their functionality, the layout engine has quite a clear
generic design:

The whole layouting is done by a series of simple processing steps applied one
after the other, each one generating a new data structure from the output of
the previous one.

The first step (parse-syntax.c) reads the input stream (using load.c), and
creates a syntax tree, which contains all the elements (HTML tags) as well as
the content (the text between the tags) assigned to each element.

The next step (parse-elements.c) looks up the element names -- which were
stored as strings up to now -- in a table, and assigns enumerated numbers to
each one, to faciliate further processing.

An additional pass is used now to fix the broken tree that is created by the
syntax parser with SGML documents. (Containing unclosed elements.)

The third step (parse-struct.c) is the central part of the process: The syntax
tree, which is a representation of the file stucture, is converted to a
structure tree, which is a representation of the page as it appears on the
screen. It contains one item for each thing visible on the page, like text
blocks, blank lines, boxes etc.

The fourth step (pre-render.c) places the items on the page. From the sizes of
the items it determines at which coordinates inside the page every single item
will be displayed. It also generates a page allocation map, allowing for fast
lookup which items are present at a certain page position.

After all these preparation passes, the interactive viewer (pager.c) is called.
Every time the visible page area changes, it uses render.c to display the new
region, according to the information from the item tree generated before.

See doc/hacking.txt or doc/hacking.html for a more in-depth discussion.


_Dumps_

If invoked with the "--debug" option, netrik prints lots of additional
information while loading/layouting the page, before the pager is (re)started.
Most every program part generates some messages, which are often (more or less)
self-explanatory; however, by far the most -- and most interesting -- dumps are
generated by the layout engine:

While parsing the syntax, every parsed character is dumped. If a parsing error
occurs (or something worse, like segmentation fault), the last character dumped
is the one which caused the problem. (The same is already done while parsing
the HTTP header, if loading by HTTP.)

After syntax parsing has finished, the whole parse tree is dumped. It may be a
bit confusing, as a node's text is printed *before* a node, not after it, as
one may expect. (The representation of the syntax tree is quite different from
W3C DOM: Instead of a mix of child element nodes and text nodes, a parent node
contains *only* a list of child nodes; the text content is always stored with
the next child node...) The reason is that the nodes stores the text that comes
before it in the document, not after it, so dumping it after it would be even
more confusing.

After parse-elements.c and sgml.c have finished, the tree is dumped again, but
this time the element and attribute names are not printed in their textual
representation from the document, but instead looked up from a table of known
facilities. Also, this second tree dump happens after the SGML fixing, as
opposed to the first. Dummy elements (for storing text content that can't be
assigned to any real child) are indicated by a question mark, and the global
element (tree top) by an exclamation mark.

After parse-struct.c and pre-render.c have finished, the resulting item tree is
dumped. The coordinates assigned by pre-render.c for each item are printed, and
the text strings of text items are dumped in the correct colours. Links and
anchors are also listed for each text item.

Again, see doc/hacking.txt for a more thorough description.


_Benchmarks_

I've decided that it's time to repeat the benchmarks, for at least three
reasons: First of all, much time has passed since I last compared, and many
browsers are available in new Versions. (Especially the graphical ones.)

Then, I realized that some browsers (links, and especially Netscape4) behave
considerably different when loading local files than when loading via HTTP.
This time I've compared HTTP speed, as this is more realistic...

Finally, to allow a more useful comparision between the text based and the
graphical browsers, I've removed all image references from the test files.

The most important obeservation was that links needs additional time to load
from HTTP. (The amount of time doesn't depend on the document contents, but
fluctuates.) For simple documents, this is quite considerable: The loading time
is up to about twice as long as for local files. That's why this time netrik,
w3m and links all had very similar results. (Sometimes links was faster,
sometimes netrik.) Lynx was still much slower. (It doesn't seem to scale well
with big files...)

The difference to the graphical browsers wasn't that big this time. When
loading local files, Netscape was nearly as fast as netrik/w3m/links, for most
files. (For files with tables, it was actually much faster then the
table-enabled text mode browsers links and w3m.)

However, it exposes a very strange behaviour when loading from HTTP: For very
simple HTML files, it gets *much* slower; but with the more complicated files,
it was still super-fast...

Opera is also gotten much better, and is sometimes nearly as fast as Netscape
with local files now. Due to Netscape's anomaly with simple files, it's
sometimes even faster over HTTP.

Mozilla is also gotten faster, but is still very much slower than Netscape or
even Opera.

Note: The tests were done with a couple of very large files (1 MB), so they
only measure pure HTML parsing (and HTTP loading) speed, but no response times
in realistic circumstances...


_Feedback_

If you just want to tell us that you love netrik (of course you do :-) ), or if
you think our code is inefficient, or if you do not like our arrogant tone, or
if you found some bug, or if you think netrik is ugly and useless, or if you
don't like our indentation, or if you found typos somewhere, or if you think
our comments are cryptic, or if you think something could be done better, or if
you have a suggestion for some feature, or if you want to know something, or if
your cat likes watching you using netrik -- in short, if ever you feel the
irresistable desire to tell us something: Do so! :-)

Send an e-mail to netrik-general@lists.sourceforge.net . Keep in mind that this
is a public mailing list, and everyone can look at the archives. If you prefer
a more "personal" way, you can also mail the maintainer (which happens to be
me): antrik@users.sourceforge.net


_Contribute_

If you want the fame of participating in the greatest project of the new
millenium ;-), or if you just feel obliged to return something to netrik for
all the happy hours you spent with it :-), or maybe if you simply want to see
your favourite feature implemented as soon as possible: Start by subscribing to
the mailing list. (s.a., _Keeping in Touch_) It's that simple. Really. (You may
want to introduce yourself after subscribing -- but we don't insist :-) )

If you want to start hacking right away, a glance at the ToDo file should give
you some ideas.


_Bugs_

Netrik is still far from complete, and many things won't work. However, all
features that are implemented should work correcty -- so if you find some bug,
don't hesitate to report it; send an e-mail. Again, the address is
netrik-general@lists.sourceforge.net