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oleo 1.6-16
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			How to Use Oleo

This is a brief description of Oleo.  It is not a good introduction to
spreadsheets in general.  We hope to provide more complete
documentation in the future.


		Cell references:

The case of cell and range letters is ignored.  Lowercase letters in
cell and range letters are silently turned into their uppercase
equivelents.

	Absolute vs Relative references:

A reference to a cell may be either absolute or relative.  The only
difference between them (besides how they are printed) is how they are
adjusted when a cell is moved or copied.

When an expression containing an absolute reference is moved or copied, the
reference will still point to the same cell.

When an expression containing a relative reference is moved or copied, the
reference is changed to point to the cell at the same offset from the
reference's new position.

So if the expression 'R[+1]C[+1]' is in cell R8C9 it refers to cell R9C10.
If the same expression is copied into cell R1C1 it will refer to R2C2.


	Address Syntax:

Oleo supports two syntaxes for cell address, called `a0' and `noa0'.
To switch between these syntaxes, use the set-option command.

	M-x set-option a0
	M-x set-option no a0


	In 'noa0' mode: (the default)

Absolute cell references have the form R{row_num}C{col_num}, as in R1C1 (the
topleft cell in the sheet).

Relative ones have the form R[{offset}]C[{offset}], as in R[-1]C[+1] (The
cell above and to the right of the current cell).  An offset of zero, can be
deleted, along with its square-brackets, as in RC[+1] (the cell to the right
of the current cell.)

Mixed-mode references also work about the same as you'd
expect, as in R4C[-1] (the cell in row four that's one left
of the current cell.)

Ranges are of the form R{row1}:{row2}C{col1}:{col2}, where the row and
column references may be either absolute or relative.  If
{row2}=={row1} or {col2}=={col1}, the colon and the redundant number
may be omitted, as in R1:10c2 (Rows one through ten in column two).

Mixed-mode rangers work, and have the syntax you'd expect, as in R2:[-1]c3.


	In 'a0' mode:

Relative cell reference have the form {col_let}{row_num}, as in A1 (the
topleft cell in the sheet).
		
Absolute ones have the form ${col_let}${row_num}, as in $A$1 (The topleft
cell in the sheet).

Mixed-mode ones work about the way you'd expect, with $A1 having an absolute
column, but a relative row. . .

Ranges are either {cell_ref}:{cell_ref} or {cell_ref}.{cell_ref}, where the
cell_refs describe opposite corners of the range.  So A1:B2 is the topmost,
leftmost four cells in the spreadsheet.

Mixed mode rangers work, and have the syntax you'd expect, as in '$A3.$F9.



		Keymaps:

Keymaps may have a 'default map'.  If a key is pressed which does not have an
assigned meaning in that map, the map's default map is checked, and that
map's default map, until a command is found or there are no more default maps
to scan.

Here is a list of keymaps, and the keymaps to which they default:
Oleo normally has five keymaps.  They are:

   KEYMAP (DEFAULT)		 USE
  universal			The root of all keymaps.
  help (universal)		Help commands.
  mouse (universal)		Bindings for mouse buttons.
  navigate (universal)		Commands that move the cursor.
  trolx-navigate (universal)	Navigate commands prefixed by ^X.
  meta-navigate (universal)     Navigate commands prefixed by ESC.
  main (navigate)		The default keymap.
  trolx (trolx-navigate)	Default ^X commands.
  meta (meta-navigate)		Default ESC commands.
  digit (main)			The numeric prefix keymap.
  edit (universal)		The keymap for edditting in the input area.
  meta-edit (universal)	  	Edit commands prefixed by ESC.
  trolx-edit (universal)	Edit commands prefixed by ^X.
  ansi (universal)		A keymap for ANSI arrows keys.


The command write-keys can be used to produce a listing of
keybindings.  Also, the source file init.c lists the default bindings.


		Input Editing:

When the spreadsheet is reading text input, you can use a few
text-editing commands.  Note that there in no history mechanism and no
yank command.  If you accidentally ^U your text, it is *gone*.
This will be improved in the future.

While the input area is active, the commands that move the cell cursor
are disabled.  If you want to move the cell cursor, use the
other-window command (^X-o) to leave and later reenter the input area.

The following editing commands are defined:

Name:		Key:	What it does:

M-A	insert-abs-ref		Insert/over-write an absolute reference to the
				current cell/region.
M-R	insert-rel-ref		Insert/over-write a relative reference to the
				current cell/region.
M-E	insert-cell-expression	Insert/over-write the expression in the
				current cell.
M-V	insert-cell-value	Insert/over-write the value of the current
				cell.
^A	cursor-begin-line	Move the cursor to the beginning of the text.
^B	cursor-back-char	Move the cursor back a character.
M-B	cursor-back-word	Move back a word.
^D	delete-next-char	Delete the character under the cursor.
M-D	delete-next-word	Delete from the cursor to the end of
				the current word.
^E	cursor-end-line		Move to the end of the text.
^F	cursor-fwd-charF	Move forward a character.
M-F	cursor-fwd-word		Move forward a word.
^H  ^?	delete-prev-char	Delete the character to the left of the cursor.
^J  ^M	finish-line		Finish editing the text, and execute the
				command you've been typing the text in for.
^K	delete-to-end		Delete from the cursor to the end of the text.
M-O	toggle-over-write	Toggle between overwrite and insert mode.
^U  ^X	delete-to-start		(BEWARE!) Deletes from the cursor to the
				beginning of the line.
^W	delete-prev-word	Delete the word to the left of the cursor.
' ' to ~ self-insert		These characters are either inserted or
				over-written into the text.
^X-O	other-window		Move the cursor into the cell area.

		Input Defaults:

Almost all editing commands remember what you typed the last time you used
that command, and start you up editing a copy of that text.  If you want to
type in something completely new, just type ^X (or ^U) and type in your new
text.


			Error Messages:

Error messages are displayed on the input line.  If oleo needs to display
more than one error message at a time, it will display [MORE] at the end of
the first msg, and will wait for you to type a key before displaying the next
one.  Oleo will also display the [MORE] message if you are entering text in
the input line, so that you will be able to see the error message.  

			Info Messages:

Some commands (like format-cell) occasionally display non-error information.
If the status line is enabled, the message is displayed there, and subsequent
non-error messages will over-write them without [MORE] prompting.  This in
quite useful if the msg in question concerns how far oleo has gotten through
some task (like reading a file).  If the status line is disabled, the
messages are displayed in the input line.

			The Main Commands:

Key	Command Name		What it does
h  ^B	go-left		These commands move the cell-cursor one cell
j  ^N	go-down		in the appropriate direction.  
k  ^P	go-up
l  ^F	go-right
y	go-upleft
u	go-upright
b	go-downleft
n	go-downright

H ^X-<	scroll-left		These scroll the current window one screenful
J M-v	scroll-down		in the appropriate direction.  They try to
K ^V	scroll-up		leave the cell cursor in (roughly the same
L ^X->	scroll-right		place in the window, so that an L followed by
Y	scroll-upleft		an H will leave the cell cursor back in the
U	scroll-upright		original cell, however, since the number of
B	scroll-downleft		rows and columns in each screenful varies,
N	scroll-downright	this will not always work.

M-H M-b	scan-left	These commands move to the first/last nonempty cell in
M-J M-n	scan-down	the current row/column.  If given a repeat count, they
M-K M-p	scan-up		go to the N-th most nonempty cell.  If there are no
M-L M-f	scan-right	cells, the cursor is moved to the leftmost/top cell.

^G	break	This will abort a partially completed command.  If you are
		typing text on the top line, the text you typed will be saved
		and presented as the default the next time you start that
		command.

^L	recenter-window		This redraws the screen.  If the page option
		is not set in this window, it will try to move the current
		cell to the center of the window.  If the page option is set,
		this will just redraw the screen.

o	set-option	This asks for an option to set or reset, and tries to
		do so.


d	set-defaults	This command will change the default alignment, format,
		protection, or width.  If the status-line is enabled,
		this will display the current settings there.

Q	quit	This command exits the spreadsheet and returns you to the
		shell.  This may ask for confirmation if oleo thinks you have
		unsaved changes.  If you do not save your changes before
		quitting, they will be lost forever.

^R M-^l	redraw-screen	This redraws the screen.  It is most useful if
		line-noise or another program has scribbled on your display.
				

M-U	set-user-format		Set a user-defined format.

v	set-variable	This prompts you for a name followed by a cell or
		range that you want to refer to by that name.  To
		'undefine' a variable, use set-variable with just its
		name.

V	show-variable

^V	show-all-variables	This shows the values of all currently defined
		variables.

!	recalculate	 Recalculate the spreadsheet until all the cells whose
		values may have changed have been evaluated.  If there are
		circular cell references, the cells in the loop will be
		evaluated at most 40 times (this number subject to change!)

:	bind-key  This asks for the name of a keymap followed by a
		command name and a key to bind it to.  If the 'command' you
		give is a cell or region in the spreadsheet, it is taken as a
		macro, and bound to the key you specify.

;	describe-key	Have the user press a key, and then describe
		what function that key is bound to.

M-<	read-commands	This command opens the file you specify reads in each
		line, and executes them as if you'd typed them in to
		execute-command.  If any command needs more arguments than are
		included on the line, it will prompt you (interactively) for
		the missing information.

M->	write-keys	Write a list of commands to the file that, when
		executed with read-commands, will return the keymaps to their
		current state.

w ^x^s		Save the spreadsheet to a file, using the current
		file-format.

r ^x^v	visit-spreadsheet	Read in a file in the current
 		file-format.  This erases the current contents of the
		spreadsheet first.  This may ask for confirmation.

R ^x^i	merge-spreadsheet
		Read in a file and merge its contents into the
		current spreadsheet.  Note that some file-formats, (like
		panic-save) won't work with this command.

^X-DEL	clear-spreadsheet
		Delete the entire spreadsheet.  This may ask
		for confirmation if oleo thinks you may be about to lose
		un-saved work.

c	copy-region	Copy a region.  Takes two ranges, copies the source
		range into the dest range.  If the dest range size is a
		multiple of the source range size, the source range is copied
		multiple times.  If the dest range is given as a cell, the
		cell is the location of the top-left corner of the dest range.

C	copy-values-in-region	Copy just the values of one region to another.

F	format-region	Change the format, alignment, protection,
		or width of a region.  If the status line is active, oleo
		will display the current alignment, format, width and
		protection of the top-left cell in the region.

m	move-region	This is similar to copy-region, except that the two
		ranges must be the same size, and that cells that reference
		the source region may be modified to reference the dest
		region instead.  (absolute references are modified, relative
		ones aren't.)  Variables whose ranges are inside the source
		region are also adjusted.

p	print-region	Print a region to a file.  Asks for a region
		(to print) and a filename to to write to.

s	sort-region	Sort a region.  This takes the region to sort, a
		region that is the first element of the region, and a list of
		cells that are to be used as the sorting-keys.  Here's an
		example.  sort-region r1:100c1:10 r1:2c1:10 +r1c2 -r1c3 This
		means: Sort the region R1:100C1:10 in two-row, ten-column
		chunks, sorting on the cell that's in the top-row
		one-column-in.  If they are similar, use the cell in the
		top-row two-columns-in, with high values ending up before low
		ones.

^x-w	write-region-to-file	Write a region of the spreadsheet to a file.
		This command is not allowed with some
		file-formats (like panic-save).

X	delete-region	Delete {value, formula, format, etc} of a
		region.  This DOES NOT ask for confirmation.

M-(	start-entering-macro	Start storing a keyboard macro.  Keyboard
		macros are strings that contain the characters you typed.

M-)	stop-entering-macro	Finish a keyboard macro, and store it in a
		cell that you specify.

M-X	execute-command		This will allow you to execute either a
		builtin command, or a macro.  For a builtin command, simply
		enter the command's name (and, optionally, any arguments the
		command will want).  For a macro, enter its name, or
		the region in the spreadsheet that contains it.

		You can create macros with text strings.  Command names may
		be enclosed in {CMD}, as in {go-left}.  Some commands may
		take arguments, as in {go-up 12} or {goto-cell r1c3}.  To
		execute multiple commands, concatenate them.  Other
		characters are taken as keystrokes, and act exactly as if you
		had typed them.

		When the spreadsheet is executing a macro, it stops when
		1) It encounters an empty cell, or one which is not a string,
		   or which is the empty string "".
		2) an error occurs while trying to parse a command name, or a
		   command's arguments.
		3) All the cells in the region have been executed.

		The top-left cell in a region is executed first, then the one
		below it, down to the bottom cell in the macro, then the one
		to the right of the top-left cell, down to the bottom cell in
		that column, etc. . .

		Macros may execute other macros.

g ^xg	goto-cell	Asks for a cell to go to, and moves the cell cursor
		there.  The cell can be either a cell name as in 'R32C96',
		or a variable.  This command starts with a default of
		wherever the cursor was the last time this command was used.
		If you type a range, the cursor is placed in the top-left
		corner of the range, and the cell-mark is placed at the
		opposite corner of the region.

^@	mark-cell	Mark one corner of a rectangular region to use for
		the next command.  (The cell cursor marks the other corner.)
		You can use this while a command is prompting you for a
		region by moving to one corner, typing ^@, moving to the
		other corner, and hitting <RETURN>.

e	edit-cell	Edit the formula of the current cell.

E	edit-value-cell		Edit the value of the current cell.  Using
		this command will replace the current cell's formula with a
		constant expression.


f	format-cell	Change the format, alignment, or protection of the
		current cell, or the width of the current column.  If the
		status line is enabled, the current alignment, format,
		protection, and width will be displayed there.

x	delete-cell	This deletes the (value, formula, format, etc) of the
		current cell.  To delete just the value and formula, use
		<space><return>.

=	edit-cell-with-default	Enter a formula for the current cell with the
		default text of the last formula you typed.

M-0	digit-0		Repeat the next command [digits] times.
M-1	digit-1		You can type multiple digits, as in
M-2	digit-2		M-1 0 0 j
M-3	digit-3		which will go down 100 cells.  This command uses the
M-4	digit-4		digit-map so that you the second and subsequent digits
M-5	digit-5		do not need to be meta-ized.
M-6	digit-6
M-7	digit-7
M-8	digit-8
M-9	digit-9

0-9	enter-text-in-cell	Enter a new formula that begins with the
		character typed.  Note that this blows away whatever was
		saved as a default from the last time you entered a formula.

O	show-options	This shows the current state of all the spreadsheet
		options, and also shows the current definitions for all the
		user-defined variables.

^X-2	split-window-vertically
^X-5	split-window-horizontally
		These commands divide the current window in half.
^X-0	delete-window
		Delete the current window.
^X-1	delete-other-windows
		Delete all but the current window.
^X-o	other-window
		Move to the next window.  Repeated, this will visit
		all the windows.

M-W	open-window	This command takes a line beginning with the letter
		'h' (for horizontal), or 'v' (for vertical), followed by the
		number of lines/columns to leave in the current window.
		The cell cursor is placed in the new window.

M-C	close-window	This takes the number of a window to close, and makes
		it go away.  The surrounding window(s) expand to fill the
		space the window occupied.

M-G	goto-window	This takes the number of a window to go to, and
		places the cell-cursor in that window.

Oleo uses the character ^\ to prefix mouse commands.  The default
bindings in the mouse map are:

0	mouse-goto
	Move to the pointed to cell.
1	mouse-mark
	Mark the pointed to cell without moving.
2	mouse-mark-and-goto
	Mark the current cell, and move to the pointed to cell.

The numbers correspond to X button numbers (usually 0 is the leftmost
button on the mouse).

		Displaying Cell Contents:

If a cell contains a number or string that takes more characters than the
width of the cell to display, the display may slop over into the cell(s) to the
right.  This does not affect the slopped over cells in any way.  Only cells
that are empty, or have their format set to hidden, will be slopped over.

If there isn't room to display a number, a series of '#', will appear in the
cell.

If there isn't room to display any other value, only the characters that fit
(less one, so there'll be a space separating cells) will be displayed.

		Numeric formats:

Oleo can display numbers in a variety of formats.  In addition to the sixteen
user-defined formats, you can use:

integer		The number is rounded to an integer before being displayed.

float		The number is displayed in normal, everyday notation, using
		whatever precision is needed (or fits).

hidden		The number is not displayed.  It is recalculated, etc as
		normal, but the cell is displayed as if it were empty.

graph		The number is displayed as a small graph.  If the number is
		close to zero, it will be displayed as '0', If it is positive,
		a row of '+'-es is displayed.  If it is negative, a row of
		'-'-es is displayed.

user-1 through	These are the sixteen user-defined formats, as described
user-16		below.

The following formats require a precision.  The precision may be a number
from zero to 14, in which case that number of digits will always be displayed
after the decimal point (zero-padding or rounding the number as needed), or
the precision may be 'float', in which case oleo will use as many digits as
necessary.  As examples:

	dollar.2			display like ``$1,769.00''
	general.float			    "    "   ``1769.00032''	



general		This uses either normal or scientific notation, depending on
		the magnitude of the number and the width of the column.

dollar		Positive values are preceeded by '$', (so 3 is displayed as
		'$3').  Negative values are parenthasized (so -3 is displayed
		as '($3)'), and all large values have a ',' every three
		digits (so 1000 is displayed as '$1,000'.

comma		Positive numbers are not preceede by '$', but this is
		otherwise identical to 'dollar'.

percent		The value is multiplied by 100, and is displayed with a
		trailing '%'.  Thus .01 displays as '1%', while 1 displays as
		'100%'.

fixed		The number is displayed in normal, everyday notation, using
		the precision specified.  'fixed.float' is the same as
		'float'.  'fixed.0' is the same as 'integer'.

exponent	The number is displayed in scientific notation.


		User-defined numeric formats:

You can set up to sixteen user-defined numeric formats:

The current parts of a format are:
(Using the 'dollar' format for an example.)

	Example:	What it is:
	$		What to print before postive numbers.
	(		What to print before negative numbers.
			What to print after positive numbers.
	)		What to print after negative numbers.
	$0		What to print if the number is zero.
	,		What to print between the thousands and the
			hundreds, etc.
	.		What to print for a decimal point.

	0-14 or float	The number of digits to print after the decimal point.
			'float' means use however many digits are needed, or
			however many will fit, whichever is less. . .

	any-number	What to multiply the value by before printing.
			Most often this will be one, but it might be 100 if
			you're printing percentages, or .000001 if you're
			printing in megabucks.  (Beware of overflow!)

Do not use digits for the headers, trailers, the comma, or the decimal point
symbol.  Using digits will confuse the internal routines and produce
incomprehensible results. . .  (Should the set-user-format command check its
input for validity?)

			Other Cell Formatting Options:

Values in a cell may be displayed aligned flush with either the left or right
edges of the cell, or centered in the cell.  The default is left-aligned.

The width of a column of cells may be set to any non-negative value.  A value
of zero means that cells in that column won't be displayed, and the normal
cursor-motion commands will skip over those cells.  However, you can position
the cursor on a non-displayed cell by using the goto-cell command.

If the width of a column is wider than the display, it is displayed as if it
were the width of the display.


			Currently Supported Options:

(no)a0		In a0 mode, Oleo uses {letters}{digits} style cell-references,
		like some popular spreadsheets.
		In noa0 mode, Oleo uses R{digits}C{digits} style references,
		like some other popular spreadsheets.

(no)auto	In auto mode, cells whose values may have chaged are
		automatically recalculated.  In noauto mode, cells are only
		recalculated when the recalculate command is used.

(no)background	In background mode, automatic recalculation is done while
(no)bkgrnd	the spreadsheet waits for you to type a key (and stops while
		the key is being handled).  In nobackground mode, oleo
		performs all its recalculation before listening for
		keystrokes. . .

(no)backup	In backup mode, whenever the spreadsheet writes out a file,
		if the file already exists, a backup copy is made (like
		emacs).

(no)bkup_copy	In nobackup mode bkup_copy is ignored.  In bkup_copy mode,
		backup files are made by copying the original file, instead of
		renaming it.

ticks (number)	This value controls how often should rnd(), cell(), my(),
		curcell(), etc cells get updated.  This value is in seconds
		(???).  The initial value is 10 seconds.

print (number)	This is the width of the page for the print command.  The
		initial value is the width of the screen.

file (format-name) If -DUSE_DLD was defined, format-name may be any .o file
		that contains definitions for the appropriate functions, or
		'panic', which is the only file format that oleo will have
		compiled into it.  If -DUSE_DLD was not defined, format-name
		must be one of sylk, sc, panic, or list, and oleo will have
		to be re-compiled before any other formats may be used.

load (file-name) This option is only avaliable if oleo was compiled with
		-DUSE_DLD.  This option loads in a .o file of spreadsheet
		functions, keyboard commands, and/or keymaps.  Spreadsheet
		functions and keyboard commands must be loaded in before they
		can be used in expressiond or bound to keys.

status (number)	This option controls which line on the screen is used for
		displaying the status of the current cell.  The number may be
		positive, (counting down from the top), negative (counting up
		from the bottom, or zero (disabling the status line).

input (number)	This option controls which line on the screen is used for
		reading lines of text.  The number may be positive (counting
		down from the top), or negative (counting up from the
		bottom), but not zero.
		
The following options affect the currently active window:

(no)page	Basically, in page mode, whenever a paticular cell is
		displayed in the window, it will always be in the same
		location on the screen.  In page mode, the recenter command
		acts just like the redraw-screen command.

(no)pageh	These options turns on or off page mode only in
(no)pagev	the horizontal or vertical axis.

link (wnum)	This option 'links' the current window with the one
		specified.  A window may only be linked to one other window
		at a time.  When a window is linked to another one, whenever
		the cell cursor in the first window is moved, the cursor in
		the other window moves as well.  (unless the cursor in other
		window is locked from moving in that diretion.)

		(Should linking to a window force that window to link
		back?  That might make life easier for naive users.)

nolink		This removes the link (if any) on the current window.
unlink

(no)lockh	These options prevent the cell cursor in the current window
(no)lockv	from moving in the horizontal or vertical direction, but only
		when the cell cursor is moved in a window that this one is
		linked.


(no)edges	In edges mode oleo displays Row and Column numbers at the top
		and left edges of the window.  Perhaps edges should be split
		into edgeh and edgev?

(no)standout	In standout mode, the edges (see (no)edges) are drawn in
		standout mode (reverse video, usually).


Options supported by the list file format:

list ch		Use the character CH to separate the cell values.


		File names:

If a file name begins with a '|', the rest of the name is taken as a command,
which oleo opens a pipe to.  So you can use the name '|zcat file.Z' to read
a compressed spreadsheed, or '|compress > file.Z' to write one.


			 Using Oleo with X11

If your system has libX11, Oleo will be built with X support.  If you run
Oleo with the DISPLAY environment variable set, Oleo will open an X window 
instead of using curses.

Under X, cells are normally displayed in the default font.  You can
change that font using the set-default-font command.  The value you
specify may include wild cards, especially for the point size of the
font.  You can change the font used for specific areas of a
spreadsheet using the commands `set-cell-font' and `set-region-font'.

			 Font Specifications

The easiest way to specify a font is to use one of the built in
short-hand names.  These names are `fixed', `times', and `courier'.
Optionally, these names can be followed by a scale.  The scale is the
ratio of the default point size to the desired point size. For
example, if the default font is a 10 point font, then `times 1.2'
refers to a 12 point Times-Roman type font.

Every font has a long name that can also be used in specifications.
The long name has three parts: an X name, a PostScript(*) name, and a
scale.  The X name and PostScript may be omitted.  The shorthand name
`times 1.2' is the same as the long name:

	*times-medium-r-*, Times-Roman, 1.2

Notice that the size is left wildcarded in the X name.  This is not
absolutely necessary, but if it is done Oleo can resize the font
should the size of the default font change (the command
set-default-point-size does this).

New short hand names can be defined using the `define-font-name'
command.  Later, if a user uses a shorthand name in a font
specification, the name is replace by the text of the definition.  For
example, here is a standard definition from init.c:

	define-font-name time *times-medium-r-*, Times-Roman

Notice that the scale has been omitted.  That is so that
specifications like `times 1.2' will be properly expanded.

		X resources and command line options.

Oleo doesn't yet recognize and .Xdefault resources or X specific
command line options.  It will in a future release.


(*) PostScript is a trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated.


			 PostScript Printing


Oleo can generate an embedded postScript redition of any part of a
spreadsheet.  Using the commands outlined in `Using Oleo with X11',
you can control the fonts used in the printed output.

The command `psprint-region' takes a range and file name as arguments.
It writes embedded postScript to the file.  

Oleo will make the output as large as possible to fit the page.  You
can change the page size using the command `set-page-size'.  For
example, the default setting is `set-page-size 8.5 x 11'.  To specify
a page size in centimeters, use: `set-page-size 20 x 30 c'.

The command `set-default-ps-font' controls the default font for cells.
For example, the initial value is `set-default-ps-font Times-Roman'.


			Formulae:

Numbers must be entered in 'general' format:
	[-]digits[.digits][e[-]digits]

Strings are entered surrounded by double-quotes.  To include unusual
characters, you can either use \char (works well for ") or use
\nnn where nnn is the octal code for the character you want to include.

			Magic constants:

Note that oleo automatically converts the names of constants to upper case,
but they can be entered in any case.

#TRUE			The logical TRUE value
#FALSE			The logical FALSE value

#ERROR			Various error types.
#BAD_INPUT
#NON_NUMBER
#NON_STRING
#NON_BOOL
#NON_RANGE
#OUT_OF_RANGE
#NO_VALUES
#DIV_BY_ZERO
#BAD_NAME
#NOT_AVAIL
#PARSE_ERROR
#NEED_OPEN
#NEED_CLOSE
#NEED_QUOTE
#UNK_CHAR
#UNK_FUNC

#INF			Various trancendental values.  On some machines,
#INFINITY		(like the vax), these may all be the same value.
#NAN
#NOT_A_NUMBER
#NINF
#MINUS_INFINITY


			Infix functions:

- num			0-num
! bool			#TRUE if bool is #FALSE
			#FALSE if bool is #TRUE, error otherwise.

num1 ^ num2		Exponentiation  This is *right* associative!
num1 * num2		Multiplication  Note that these functions are not as
num1 / num2		Division	good as they should be at detecting
int1 % int2		Modulus		overflow.  There *is* code that should

num1 + num2		Addition	force integer expressions to become
num1 - num2		subtraction	floating-point if the result wouldn't
					fit in an integer.
num1 >= num2		Arithmatic greater-or-equal
num1 > num2		greater-than
num1 < num2		less-than
num1 <= num2		less-than-or-equal

val1 = val2		#TRUE if val1 and val2 can be considered equal.
			#FALSE otherwise
val1 != val2		Equivelent to !(val1=val2)

str1 & str2		Text concatination.

bool ? val1 : val2	if(bool==#TRUE)
				evaluate val1
			else if(bool!=#FALSE)
				error...
			else
				evaluate val2.

( val )			(To override default precedence) Note that since oleo
			stores expressions in a byte-compiled form, excess
			parens will mysteriously vanish.


		Prefix functions:

In 'a0' mode, all prefix functions have '@' prepended to their names.

if(bool,val1,val2)	if(test==#TRUE)
				evaluate val1
			else if(test!=#FALSE)
				error...
			else
				evaluate val2.
and(bool1,bool2)	if(val1==#FALSE)
				#FALSE
			else if(val1!=#TRUE)
				error...
			else val2;
or(bool1,bool2)		if(val1==#TRUE)
				#TRUE
			else if(val1!=#FALSE)
				error...
			else val2;
pi()			3.14159265358979326848
row()			The row number of the cell the expression is in.
col()			The column number of the cell the expression is in.
now()			The current time in seconds since Jan 1 1970 (?)
abs(num)		The absolute value of num.
acos(num)		The arc-cosine of num (num in radians)
asin(num)		The arc-sine of num (num in radians)
atan(num)		The arc-tangent of num (in radians)
int(num)		Convert to integer (toward zero)
ceil(num)		Convert to integer (round up)
floor(num)		Convert to integer (round down)
cos(num)		The cosine of num (in radians)
dtr(num)		num degrees in radians
exp(num)		The exponential function of num
log(num)		The natural log of num
log10(num)		The log of num to base 10
rtd(num)		num radians in degrees
sin(num)		The sine (in radians) of num
sqrt(num)		The square-root of num
tan(num)		The tangent (in radians) of num
rnd(num)		A random number from 0 to num-1
negate(num)		0-num
not(bool)		#TRUE if bool is #FALSE
			#FALSE if bool is #TRUE, error otherwise.
iserr(val)		#TRUE if the expression is an error
			else #FALSE
isnum(val)		#TRUE if the expression is a number, or can be
			automatically converted into a number, thus
			isnum("12") is #TRUE, while isnum("12 ") is
			#FALSE. (This might be worth fixing.)
rows(rng)		number of rows in rng.
cols(rng)		number of columns in rng.
ctime(num)		Convert num into a readable date/time string.
atan2(num1,num2)	Two number arctangent
hypot(num1,num2)	use man 2 hypot
fixed(num1,num2)	num1 rounded to num2 decimal places

index(rng,int)		the contents of the int-th cell in rng.
index(rng,num1,num2)	The contents of the int1-th down and int2-th
			over cell in rng
oneof(int,val1,val2,val3...) switch(int) {
				case 1: val1;
				case 2: val2;
				...
				default: error;
			}

For the following functions, arguments that are ranges are scanned
for numeric values only.  Strings, error values, empty cells, etc, are ignored.
All these functions except cnt() will give a #NO_VALUES error if it does not
find any numbers.  You can give most of the functions an explicit value if
you don't want to get a #NO_VALUES error.  For example, if you want to add
up the range r1:20c5, and return 0 if there are no numbers there,
'sum(0,r1:20c5)' will work.

Strings, etc, that are explicitly given to the functions are subjected to the
usual conversion.

sum(vr1...)		...
prod(vr1...)		...
avg(vr1...)		...
std(vr1...)		The SAMPLE standard deviation.  To get the population
			standard deviation, use sqrt(var(...))
max(vr1...)		...
min(vr1...)		...
cnt(vr1...)		The number of numeric values found.
var(vr1...)		The POPULATION variance.  To get the sample variance,
			use std(...)^2

These functions are in the 'string' package.  If oleo is compiled with
-DUSE_DLD, the string package must be loaded before these functions can be
used.  If a spreadsheet that uses these functions is loaded before the
string package is loaded, things will fail (silently!)  (This is probably a
bug.

len(str)		length of string in characters.
strupr(str)		string converted to upper case
strlwr(str)		string converted to lower case
strcap(str)		string with each word capitalized.
trim(str)		string with extra spaces and non-ascii chars
			removed.
find(str1,str2,int)	return the location where str2 appears in
			str1, start looking at character #int
substr(int1,int2,str)	The characters in string from position int1
			to position int2.  Positions can be either
			positive (First character is #1, last char is
			#(length of string)) or negative(last
			character is #-1, first character is #-(length
			of string)).
mid(str,int1,int2)	The characters in string from int1 (counting
			from the beginning) continuing for int2 chars.
edit(str,int1,int2,...)	Remove the text from int1 to int2 in string
			and replace it with ... (zero or more strings)
			int1 and int2 are like for substr() above.
repeat(int,str)		str repeated int times, thus repeat(2,"foo")
			returns "foofoo"
concat(vr1,...)		Concatinate strings, ranges, etc.


These functions are in the 'cells' package.  If oleo is compiled with
-DUSE_DLD, the cells package must be loaded before these functions can be
used.
my(str)			String:		Returns:
			row		row()
			column		col()
			width		The width of the column containing
					this cell.
			lock		"locked" or "unlocked"
			protection	ditto
			justify		"left" "right" "center" or "default"
			alignment	ditto
			format		"default" "user-1" etc.
			fmt		ditto.
			type		"error", "boolean", "float",
					"integer", "null", "Unknown",
					etc.
			formula		A string of the cell's current
					formula.
			value		The cells current value.
			anything-else	error--> #BAD_INPUT

curcell(str)		Like my(), but for the cell under the
			cell-cursor in the current window.

cell(int1,int2,str)	Like my(), but for the cell at Rint1Cint2.

member(rng,val)		The number of the first cell in RNG that contains
			VAL, or zero if no cells contain it.


These next four functions could probably be replaced by a pair of smart
regex routines. . .

smember(rng,str)	The number of the first cell in RNG that contains a
			substring of STR, or zero if no cell contains one.

members(rng,str)	The number of the first cell in RNG whose value is
			a substring of STR.

pmember(rng,str)	The number of the first cell in RNG whose value
			equals the first few characters of STR.

memberp(rng,str)	The number of the first cell in RNG whose value
			starts with STR.

hlookup(rng,num,int)	Scan through the top row of RANGE looking for a
			number which is greater than NUM.  Then return the
			value in the cell that is INT rows down from the top
			of the range.

vlookup(rng,num,int)	Like hlookup, but scans the left column
			and returns the value in the cell that is INT
			columns over from the left edge of the range.

vlookup_str(rng,num,str)Like vlookup, but scans the left column
			for a string.  The column need not be sorted.

These functions are in the 'busi' package.  If oleo is compiled with
-DUSE_DLD, the busi package must be loaded before these functions can be
used.

pmt(p,r,t)		Payment per period for a loan of $P at rate R for T
	payments.

pv(pmt,int,term)	Present value of an investment that pays $PMT at the
	end of each of TERM periods with a discount rate (interest) of INT.

npv(rng,rate)		Net Present Value of an investment which will pay
	uneaven payments.  The term is calculated from the number of cells in
	RNG.  .

irr(rng,guess)		Internal Rate of Return.  This function is paticularly
	untested, and should not be trusted.

fv(pmt,int,term)	Future Value of an annuity.

rate(fut,pres,term)	Interest rate required to turn $PRES into $FUT in
	TERM periods.

term(pmt,int,fut)	Number of periods required to collect $FUT in
	payments of $PMT, where depositd payments earn at a rate of INT.

cterm(int,fut,pres)	Number of periods required to collect $FUT from a
	single initial deposit of $PRES, at an interest rate of INT.

sln(cost,scrap,life)	Straight line depreciation of an asset that cost
	$COST when new, can be sold for $SCRAP, and will last for LIFE
	periods.

syd(cost,scrap,life,per)	Sum-of-the-digits depreciation of an asset
	that cost $COST, can be sold for $SCRAP and lasts LIFE, in period PER.

ddb(cost,scrap,life,per)	Double-declining-balance deprecion, otherwise
	similar to syd().

anrate(pmt,pres,term)	
anterm(pmt,prin,rate)
balance(prin,rate,term,period)
paidint(prin,rate,term,period)
kint(prin,rate,term,period)
kprin(prin,rate,term,period)
compbal(print,rate,term)