File: RELNOTES.txt

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Release notes for Open Source OSS version v4.2-build2017
==================================================


What is the open sourced version
--------------------------------

It is an open source version of the Open Sound System (OSS) sound subsystem 
software released under the GPL license. The only difference between the 
"commercial" version  and the open source version of OSS is the commercial 
version contains certain drivers that contain code encumbered under NDA.

There are three source packages released by 4Front Technologies:

  * GPL version contains the source code for Linux 
  * CDDL version contains the source code for Solaris 
  * BSD version contains the source code for FreeBSD (and other BSD OSs)

See www.opensound.com for more information about OSS. Our developer web site
(http://developer.opensound.com) will give additional information for 
application developers and OSS contributors.

NOTICE! In general it is not possible to mix binary modules from the commercial
OSS package with rest of the software compiled from open source OSS sources
because certain header files and core data structures are incompatible. If you
need to use one of the drivers missing from the open source version you will
have to use the retail version of OSS instead.

Build system requirements
-------------------------

To be able to extract the source files from the tarball you will
need the bunzip2 command in the system. It's usually available by default
but otherwise you will need to download the sources from the net and compile it.

OSS is currently compatible with the following operating systems and processor 
architectures. Other environments may be supported later.

Operating system	Version			Processor architecture

Solaris/OpenSolaris	10 or later		x86, amd64, Sparc (64 bit)
Linux			2.6 or later		x86, x86_64
FreeBSD			6 or later		x86, x86_64
SCO UnixWare		7 or later		x86
SCO OpenServer		6 or later		x86

Note that the very latest kernel versions may not be supported out of box.
Changes may be needed to OSS before it supports them.

The system used to build OSS should have full kernel/driver development
environment installed (C/C++ compiler, linker, make, kernel headers, etc).
Please refer to the documentation of the operating system you are using

Under Linux and FreeBSD the C compiler to use is GCC (_MUST_ be v3.0 or later).
With the other operating systems you need to use the C compiler provided by
the operating system vendor.

In addition GNU awk needs to be available in the system as gwak. Otherwise the
manual pages will not be created correctly (otherwise OSS will compile and
work OK).

The stock make command shipped with some operating systems (SCO UnixWare and
OpenServer) is not capable to compile OSS. In such systems you will have to 
install GNU make and use it instead. The make utilities shipped with Linux,
Solaris and FreeBSD are OK.


GTK 1.2 or GTK 2.0 development libraries must also be installed for the
GUI apps like ossxmix. GTK 2.0 must be installed and registered via pkgconfig
or GTK-1.2 must be installed and gtk-config must be there in the path.


Target system requirements
--------------------------

OSS can be installed in a different computer system than where the
software was compiled (OTOH in many cases these systems are the same machine).

Under Linux and FreeBSD some parts of the software need to be compiled in
the target system to handle differences between different kernel versions. For
this reason it's necessary to have a functional kernel development system
installed in the target machine too. In FreeBSD this is the default. 

Under Linux systems the target machine should have the following packages
installed (unfortunatgely they are not installed by default.

- Kernel sources and/or headers for the currently active kernel. 
- C compiler (gcc or cc)
- make (gmake or make)
- GNU binutils (ld, as)
- GNU awk (gawk)
- Standard C library (libc/glibc) headers.
- GTK+ (either v1.2 or v2.0)

Source directory structure
--------------------------

The directory scheme of OSS is different from most other software packages. 
Instead of storing source files in the "build" tree we have separated
the build (object) directory from the source directory. In this way the sources
can be located in a common directory on a (NFS) server and shared between
several "build" machines possibly running different operating systems. Any
number of build machines can be used to compile OSS at the same time without
disturbing each other. However nothing prevents from having the source 
directory located in the local machine or even on CD-ROM or some other 
read-only media.

There is nothing special in the source directory. Its contents are distributed
in the source tarball (oss-v4.2-build2017-src-gpl.tar.bz2).

The build directory is a special directory that contains symbolic links to
the corresponding files in the source directory. Files in the build directory
can be edited and the changes will be directed to the original file in the
source directory (provided that it is writeable). However the object files will
only be created in the local build directory only.

Note that there is also some C code (.c and .inc) files that are not built in 
the source system but in the target. These files are located in the 
setup/`uname`/oss directory. This is necessary because certain kernel data
structures depend on the kernel version being installed in the target system.
The goal of this mechanism is that majority of the code can be compiled in
any system. Only the kernel version dependent parts (wrappers) need to be
compiled in the target system (this mechanism will become unnecessary in the
future when these operating systems (Linux in particular) get a proper
device driver interface.


Installing the sources
----------------------

Save the tarball containing the source files in /tmp (or some other
directory in the development system). In this document we will assume
that you have stored the sources in /tmp/oss-v4.2-build2017-src-gpl.tar.bz2.

Go to the directory where you would like to create the source directory.
For example:

	cd /usr/src

Next restore the files in the tarball by executing the following command:

	bunzip2 -c /tmp/oss-v4.2-build2017-src-gpl.tar.bz2 | tar xvf -

(Or if you have GNU make (Linux, FreeBSD) you simply use 
tar xvfj /tmp/oss-v4.2-build2017-src-gpl.tar.bz2).

After restoring the files they will appear in the oss-v4.2-build2017-src-gpl 
subdirectory under the current directory.

Note! bunzip2 command is part of the bzip2 package.

Compiling obsolete drivers
--------------------------

Drivers for few sound cards are no longer actively maintained and they will
not be compiled by default. These devices have been out of production for
about 10 years and we don't expect that anybody has them any more:

	oss_allegro
	oss_als3xx
	oss_als4k
	oss_digi32
	oss_maestro
	oss_neomagic
	oss_s3vibes
	oss_vortex

The above drivers are located in the attic/drv subdirectory and they will not
get compiled by default. However you can compile any of them after creating
a symbolic link (this needs to be done in the source directory before running
the configure script. For example if you would like to compile the oss_digi32
driver then you can do the following:

	cd kernel/drv
	ln -s ../../attic/drv/oss_digi32 .

Creating the build environment
------------------------------

If you have an earlier OSS build directory in the system it's recommended that
you remove it before creating the build directory for v4.2-build2017
alternatively you may create separate build directories for different 
OSS versions.

Before you can build OSS you will need to create an empty "build" directory
and run the configure script. This as well as the actual compile/build step can
be done by any user (ie super user capabilities are not required).

NOTE! THE BUILD DIRECTORY MUST BE OUTSIDE THE SOURCE DIRECTORY. Otherwise
      the configure script will go to endless loop and fail. You need to give
      absolute path to the source directory when running configure. Relative
      paths (such as ../$TARGETDIR/configure) will not work properly.

The build directory can be located anywhere (say in your home directory).
However the directory must be completely empty (no files in it). For example
you can create and initialize the build directory in the following way
(assuming that the source directory is /usr/src/$TARGETDIR):

	mkdir oss
        cd oss
        /usr/src/$TARGETDIR/configure

The configure script will perform slightly different steps depending on the
current operating system.

SCO OpenServer and SCO UnixWare are regarded as the same plattform and the
same OSS package will work under both of them.

Solaris environment differs from the other operating systems because the 
same build will compile both 32 and 64 bit drivers. So there will be two
almost identical subdirectory trees (i386 and amd64) under Solaris.

Some drivers only work under x86 or certain operating systems. For this reason
not all drivers will get compiled in some environments.

Command line arguments of the configure script
----------------------------------------------

In most cases you should execute the configure script without any command
line arguments. The following switches are available but they are mostly
untested and should only be used in special situations.


--regparm
--no-regparm

These switches are only defined for Linux. They control if OSS is to be built
for a kernel compiled with or without the CONFIG_REGPARM setting. By default 
OSS drivers will be compiled for both alternatives and the right one will be
selected automatically when OSS is installed.

--target=uclinux-blackfin

Experimental an incompletely implemented hack for cross compiling OSS for
uClinux/Blackfin. Do not use.

--copy-files

By default the configure script will create symbolic links from the build
directory to the original files in the source directory. This switch can be 
used to force copying of files instead of linking. This will result in multiple
copies of the same file in the source tree (under Linux and Solaris/x86).
For this reason this switch should not be used.

--config-vmix=FLOAT | FIXEDPOINT | NO

By default the virtual mixer (vmix) subsystem will be enabled. Depending on the target operating system
it will use floating point (Linux) or fixed point arithmetic. This command line switch can be used
to disable vmix (NO) or to enforce fixed point (FIXEDPOINT). Note that floating point is not supported
under other that x86/x86_64 processors. Also some operating systems don't support it.

--config-midi=NO|YES

By default (in OSS v4.1) MIDI support is disabled. If you like to do hacking with MIDI you can enable it
by using --config-midi=YES.

Compiling OSS
-------------

You can compile OSS by running make under the build directory. This will
only compile the C source files to binary objects but doesn't actually build 
the installable files. There are few make targets that are used to 
build the software in different ways:

make build:

This command compiles the binaries and runs the ./build.sh script
(OS dependent) to create the full prototype tree (./prototype). This directory
contains a copy of the files to be installed in the target system (relative
to the / directory).

make install:

This command does "make build" and then copies the files/directories located
in the ./prototype subdirectory to their proper places (under /). After that
the script performs the (OS dependent) steps required to install the drivers
in the local system. It may be necessary to run soundoff and soundon to reload
the drivers in the kernel after running "make install".

This method is a fast way to recompile and install OSS in the system
when hacking with the drivers. However it's necessary to create the proper
installation package and install it when installing a new OSS version
for the first time.

make package:

This command will compile the OSS software and buil a proper installation 
package (.rpm, .pkg or something else depending on the operating system).
This package (from the local directory) can then be installed in the target
system (local computer or somewhere else) using the usual software installation
and management tools (pkgadd/pkgrm, rpm) provided by the operating system.

Notice that this command may not work properly in all Linux systems because
most Linux distributions are incompatible with each other. So the
files/scripts used to create the RPM package may need to be edited if you are
using any other distribution than SuSE or Redhat/Fedora. In particular Debian
style package management is not supported. If you are installing OSS in a
noncompatible system you will have to use "make install" (or to move the
files using a tar package and then run the install script 
(cd /usr/lib/oss/build;sh install.sh).

Summary: (This is how we build OSS at 4front)
---------------------------------------------
1) cd /usr/src; tar -jxvf oss-v4.2-build2017-src-gpl.tar.bz2
2) mkdir /usr/src/oss; cd /usr/src/oss
3) /usr/src/$TARGETDIR/configure
4) make install
   This step compiles the software and copies the files to their right
   places. Finally it starts the drivers using the soundon script.

Installing the compiled (binary) package in the target system
-------------------------------------------------------------

After running make package the install package (.pkg/.rpm) will be created in
the build directory. This package can be moved to the target system and
installed using the pkgadd or rpm commands.

Managing OSS installation
-------------------------

OSS can be started and stopped by using the soundon and soundoff commands
(respectively). Soundon will create a log file (/usr/lib/oss/logs/soundon.log)
that contains debugging information that helps in solving problems with OSS.

Installing the OSS package will also install a startup script (usually
/etc/rc3.d/S89oss) that will start OSS automatically when the system gets
rebooted. So running soundoff or soundon is manually is rarely necessary.

Information about the devices in the system can be printed using
the ossinfo command (ossinfo -v3 for most detailed output).

When new hardware is installed in ths system it is usually necessary to
run the ossdetect utility (ossdetect -v for verbose output) to find the new
devices in the system. After running ossdetect you will need to run soundoff
and soundon to reload the drivers (not necessary under Solaris).

Configuration options
---------------------

The /usr/lib/oss/conf directory will contain various configuration
files (or actually symbolic links to the actual files in system dependent
directories). These files can be edited using any text editor to change the
settings. However there is rarely need to change these settings.

You need to run soundoff and soundon to make the config option changes
to take effect. Under SCO OpenServer and UnixWare you will also need to run
the following commands _before_ doing soundoff;soundon:

	cd /usr/lib/oss/build
	sh install.sh

Developing OSS compatible applications
--------------------------------------

The OSS API is documented in the OSS Programmer's Guide
(http://manuals.opensound.com/developer).

Making modifications to Open Sound System
-----------------------------------------

If you plan to make modifications to Open Sound System, please check
our developer web site (http://developer.opensound.com) before doing anything.
Also it's recommended that you join the oss-devel mailing list and describe
the changes you are planning to do. We will accept contributions to the code.
However there are certain rules the contributions must follow before they can
be accepted. First of all the contributions must not cause any compatibility
problems between different OSS versions. Also changes that may increase 
complexity of the OSS API or could cause incompatibilities between devices will
probably not be accepted.